Preston Doerflinger

Preston Doerflinger, Office of State Finance director, during a November 2011 tax credit task force meeting.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Facing a budget hole of more than $611 million, state lawmakers said they're looking everywhere for revenue to fill that hole.

On Friday, Governor Fallin's finance secretary, Preston Doerflinger, said he may have found a source of savings: agency travel costs, agencies' memberships to other organizations and agency promotional and events expenses, or what his office calls "swag."

Gov. Mary Fallin and other state leaders observe a PowerPoint presentation of revenue projections.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The State Board of Equalization met Thursday to certify state revenues for Gov. Mary Fallin's budgeting ahead of the next legislative session and fiscal year. Oklahoma has enough revenue to trigger an income tax cut.

The amount of money available to fund state government is trending flat, but officials say lackluster revenues seem manageable.

Prediction: Next Year's State Budget To Be Flat

Nov 13, 2014
Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger
Oklahoma PCA / Flickr Creative Commons

Secretary of Finance, Administration and Information Technology Preston Doerflinger warned Thursday that next fiscal year’s state appropriated budget will be flat.

Doerflinger’s comments came in his monthly General Revenue Fund report. The report showed General Revenue Fund (GRF) collections in October totaled $471.6 million. That was $3.4 million, or 0.7 percent, above the official estimate upon which the FY2015 appropriated state budget is based and $23.3 million, or 5.2 percent, above prior year collections.

Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger
Oklahoma PCA / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma finance officials say collections to the state's main operating fund are increasing from last year in most major revenue categories and have exceeded the official estimate by more than 6 percent.

The Office of Management and Enterprise Services reported Tuesday that collections to the state's General Revenue Fund for the first quarter of the fiscal year totaled more than $1.3 billion, which is 6.1 percent above the official estimate. That amount also exceeded prior year collections by 9.4 percent.

Tax Revenue Jump Is Largest In Over A Year

Sep 8, 2014
Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s August tax collections increased by 7.5 percent, the largest percentage increase in monthly receipts since July 2013, State Treasurer Ken Miller said in a media statement. Miller said August receipts “were just less than $900 million.”

“Oklahoma’s economy continues to climb up the expansion side of the business cycle,” Miller said. “Our people are earning and spending more, as reflected by steady growth in income tax and sales tax receipts.”

Preston Doerflinger, Office of State Finance director, during a November 2011 tax credit task force meeting.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin's chief budget negotiator says a tentative deal has been reached with the House and Senate on a roughly $7 billion budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

State Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger said Friday details of the plan will be released later in the day after the budget is presented in closed-door meetings with rank-and-file members of the House and Senate.

House Speaker Jeff Hickman says he hopes a bond issue to repair the state's crumbling Capitol is part of the final agreement.

Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger
Oklahoma PCA / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma's finance secretary says collections by the general revenue fund fell 9.1 percent below the official estimate in March.

Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger said Tuesday the state experienced another month of unusually low corporate income tax revenue. Doerflinger says that the decline followed a major increase in tax credit claims.

russavia / Creative Commons

State lawmakers will have even less revenue to appropriate this year for state services than initially projected, in large part due to volatile corporate income tax collections.

oklahoma capitol facade
KellyK / Flickr Creative Commons

State finance officials say collections to Oklahoma government's main operating fund improved in January, lessening the chance that mandatory budget cuts will be ordered for the current fiscal year.

Figures released Tuesday by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services show January collections to the General Revenue Fund totaled $610 million. That amount is 6.5 percent above the official estimate used to build the current year's state budget.

Gov. Mary Fallin enters the House chamber of the state capitol shortly before delivering her State of the State address February 3, 2014.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Five percent.

That’s how much the governor is asking most entities in state government to cut their budgets. The number should not be much of a surprise. The amount of money available for state lawmakers to spend for the next fiscal year was already down about $171 million over the current year’s figure.

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