race relations

Code Switch
5:33 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

Families Want Federal Investigations Into Black Men's Deaths

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder attends a meeting with the My Brother's Keeper Task Force in May. He announced today that he is stepping down from his job.
Olivier Douliery/Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 6:29 pm

The families of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who was shot last month by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner, who died in July after being placed in a chokehold by an officer in New York, called on the Justice Department to take the lead in the investigations into the two deaths.

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Oklahoma News
7:22 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

OKC Rally Focuses On Race And Police issues

More than 100 people turned out at the Oklahoma Capitol on Thursday to rally and discuss race-related issues and seek ways to educate themselves and police.

The rally comes in response to the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and subsequent protests. Brown, who is black, was unarmed when he was shot to death by a white police officer.

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Missouri Protests
1:49 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Arrest Of Journalists In Ferguson Raises More Questions About Police Conduct

A member of the St. Louis County Police Department points his weapon in the direction of a group of protesters in Ferguson, Mo. on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014. On Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, a white police officer fatally shot Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, in the St. Louis suburb. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:36 pm

Two journalists were arrested and detained in Ferguson, Missouri, last night, amid high tensions following the death of teenager Michael Brown, who was shot by a police officer.

NPR Media Correspondent David Folkenflik joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss what these arrests say about the media covering the situation in Ferguson, and what this could reveal about how police are treating locals.

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Missouri Protests
1:48 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Reporter Recounts His Arrest In Ferguson

Demonstrators, protesting the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown, flee as police shoot tear gas into the crowd of several hundred after someone reportedly threw a bottle at the line of police on August 13, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Brown was shot and killed by a Ferguson police officer on Saturday. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 1:36 pm

Governor Jay Nixon is expected to visit Ferguson, Missouri, today, in the aftermath of last night’s volatile confrontations between police and protesters — and journalists.

There have been escalating clashes in Ferguson since police shot Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager, in the town on Saturday. Last night, police ratcheted up their response, firing tear gas into the crowd, and using sonic cannons.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
8:42 am
Wed July 2, 2014

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:15 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Code Switch
9:11 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Stokely Carmichael, A Philosopher Behind The Black Power Movement

Martin Luther King Jr., shown here with Stokely Carmichael during a voter registration march in Mississippi in 1966, regarded the younger Carmichael as one of the civil rights movement's most promising leaders.
Lynn Pelham Time

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:26 am

Before he became famous — and infamous — for calling on black power for black people, Stokely Carmichael was better known as a rising young community organizer in the civil rights movement. The tall, handsome philosophy major from Howard University spent summers in the South, working with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC, to get African-Americans in Alabama and Mississippi registered to vote in the face of tremendous, often violent resistance from segregationists.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
6:56 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Seeing Opportunity In A Question: 'Where Are You Really From?'

Alex Sugiura was featured, along with his brother and other mixed-race Americans, in the 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic Magazine in October. The brothers are of Japanese and Eastern European descent, but people often mistake Alex for Hispanic.
Martin Schoeller National Geographic

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 10:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

"Where are you from?"

"No, really, where are you from?"

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

World Views: September 6, 2013

Joshua Landis, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the fear in Japan that the amount of contaminated water at the Fukushima nuclear power plant is getting out of hand, and increasing number of attacks and violence against women in India.

Later, a conversation with about indigenous people and issues in Guatemala with Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

World Views
4:25 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Understanding Issues Of Land And Wealth For Indigenous Guatemalans

A Kakchiquel family in the hamlet of Patzutzun, Guatemala.
Credit John Isaac / UN Photo

In 1996, Guatemala ended a 36-year civil war that devastated the country’s indigenous community. Seventeen years later, indigenous people in the Central American country are still seeking justice after the decades-long conflict.

“They agreed to sign not only a peace agreement, but also an amnesty law which says that all those people who committed human rights violations will not be prosecuted legally,” says Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
7:38 am
Wed August 14, 2013

A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss.
Baltimore Sun

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 6:43 am

In April of 1963, a Baltimore mailman set off to deliver the most important letter in his life — one he wrote himself. William Lewis Moore decided to walk along Highway 11 from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., hoping to hand-deliver his letter to Gov. Ross Barnett. Moore wanted Barnett to fundamentally change Mississippi's racial hierarchy — something unthinkable for a Southern politician at the time.

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