refugees

A girl in the West Bank plays with a handmade calendar created by Child's Cup Full
Child's Cup Full

University of Oklahoma human relations professor Janette Habashi grew up was born in Jerusalem, but left to pursue graduate work in England and the United States. But her native West Bank has never been far from her heart.

Imam Imad Enchassi leads a prayer at the Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City.
Brian Perlman / KGOU

Over 4.8 million refugees have fled the violence in Syria since the civil war began five years ago. The majority are in camps in Turkey, Lebanon, and other countries in the Middle East. Over 22,000 refugees resettled in the United States from October through February, but only 955 were Syrian. Only three Syrians have settled in Oklahoma since 2012.

The Obama administration plans to resettle 10,000 Syrian refugees next year, despite criticism that they could present a security hazard. Few Syrians have been settled in Oklahoma, but 40 years ago, a wave of refugees from Vietnam arrived in the state. Those Vietnamese newcomers helped reshape a dying part of Oklahoma City. Jacob McCleland from KGOU reports.

San Nguyen stands along Classen Blvd. in Oklahoma City's Asian District.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

San Nguyen stands along Classen Blvd. in Oklahoma City’s Asian District and points out some of the Vietnamese-owned businesses north of NW 23rd Street.

 

“We have the hair salon. We have the massage center. We have the chiropractice,” Nguyen said. “We have a lot of Vietnamese restaurants that go up here to 36th.”

 

Syrian refguees arrive on the Mediterranean coast, Sept. 2015.
Freedom House / Flickr Public Domain Mark 1.0

 

Last week, the U.S. House passed a bill to halt a program that brings Syrian refugees to the United States. The vote came less than a week after the ISIS attack in Paris that left over one hundred people dead.

Oklahoma has a long history of taking in refugees. Notably, Vietnamese refugees settled in Oklahoma City in the mid-1970s. Now, many Burmese refugees of the ethnic Zomi minority are establishing themselves in both Oklahoma City and the Tulsa area.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about how the millions of refugees streaming into Syria are affecting daily life in Istanbul, and could impact parlimentary elections weeks from now.

Then, a conversation about business ethics and responsibility in the developing world with Melike Yetken. She works with the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

A vendor sells coffee in the Turkish city of Izmir - September 21, 2015.
Charles Roffey / Flickr

No country has been more affected by the crisis of migrants and refugees fleeing Syrian than its northern neighbor, Turkey.

Millions of Syrians have escaped into Turkey, with hundreds of thousands in Istanbul alone – dwarfing the numbers seen in Europe.

The European Union is now pledging to help Italy after a boat capsized last week and killed hundreds of African migrants. Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss how European governments are struggling with refugee and asylum policies.

Richard Clarke is famously known for criticizing the Bush Administration for not doing enough to stop 9/11.  But he now focuses on issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft, especially by the Chinese government.

Over the past 11 months, the Zaatari refugee camp in Northern Jordan has hosted hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees fleeing that country’s civil war.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise visited the camp in early June, and witnessed some of the newest arrivals.

Real-time updates on social media are revolutionizing traditional journalism. By following Twitter feeds and other forms of social media, journalists like NPR Senior Strategist Andy Carvin now identify breaking news faster and do a better job following international stories.

Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Over the past 11 months, the Zaatari refugee camp in Northern Jordan has hosted hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees fleeing that country’s civil war.

World Views host Suzette Grillot and regular contributor Rebecca Cruise visited the camp in early June, and witnessed some of the camp's newest arrivals.

“They had their life's belongings in a wheelbarrow,” Cruise says. “They were coming in with some hope, and unfortunately, I don't know hopeful the situation really is going to be for them. So that was very sad to see."