Russia

World Views
11:32 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Big Winners In Latest Syria Developments? Moscow And Assad

President Obama meets in the White House Situation Room with his national security advisors to discuss strategy in Syria, Saturday, August 31, 2013.
Credit Pete Souza / The White House

Joshua Landis recaps this week's developments in Syria with Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise .

Earlier this week President Obama asked congressional leaders to postpone a vote on legislation that would authorize the use of force against Syria.

“We will work together in consultation with Russia and China to put forward a resolution at the U.N. Security Council requiring Assad to give up his chemical weapons and to ultimately destroy them under international control,” the president said in a televised address to the nation Tuesday night.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma and the author of the influential and widely-read blog Syria Comment, says the new diplomatic development is a victory for Moscow.

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Nuclear Arms
3:01 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

Inhofe: Now Is Not The Time To Reduce US Nukes

Oklahoma Senator Jim Inhofe speaking at the 2012 CPAC in Washington, D.C.
Credit Gage Skidmore / Flickr

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) says now is not the time to reduce the country's nuclear arms forces around the globe.

Oklahoma's senior senator made the comments Wednesday in response to President Barack Obama's call during a speech in Berlin to reduce U.S. and Russian nuclear stockpiles by one-third.

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3:15 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Syria's Conflict: What Happens if Both Sides Get More Weapons?

Lead in text: 
KGOU's "World Views" contributor Joshua Landis tells the PBS Newshour more arms will certainly lead to more killing in the short run, but if the Western countries are willing to go toe to toe with Russia, Iran and Hezbollah in Syria, they can certainly give better arms and provide more lethal air power.
Syria's civil war reportedly has killed more than 90,000 people, and it looks like both sides are on the way to acquiring heavier weaponry, even as the United States and Russia are attempting to bring them together for talks.
World Views: May 17, 2013
4:30 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

World Views: May 17, 2013

Listen to the entire May 17, 2013 episode.

University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith joins the program for a conversation about the eurozone's economy slipping further into recession, and the American kicked out of Russia over accusations of spying for the CIA.

Veteran diplomat Richard Arndt speaks with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis about how the national security state changed U.S. diplomatic relations. He's the author of The First Resort of Kings: American Cultural Diplomacy in the Twentieth Century.

World Views
10:13 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Spy Vs. Spy: Latest Arrest Shows Cold War Still Resonates

Visitors flock to Red Square in Moscow
Credit Raul P / Panoramio

The embarrassing arrest of a suspected CIA officer in Moscow is the latest reminder that even after the Cold War, the United States and Russia are engaged in an espionage battle with secret tactics, spying devices, and training that sometimes isn't enough to avoid being caught.

"There's nothing new here," says Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. "We spy, everybody spies. There's a long history of spying between these two countries."

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri April 26, 2013

World Views: April 26, 2013

LIsten to the entire April 26, 2013 episode

This time last week Americans were just starting to learn about the troubled Russian region of Chechnya after authorities released the identities of the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Rebecca Cruise discusses women in combat and the U.S. drone program with NPR's Rachel Martin. Before taking over the host's chair of Weekend Edition Sunday, she reported from both Iraq and Afghanistan, and served as the network's national security correspondent.

World Views
11:38 am
Fri April 26, 2013

What You Should Know About the Troubled Russian Region of Chechnya

Monument to the conflicts in Afghanistan and Chechnya in Yekaterinburg, Sverdlovskaya Oblast, Russia.
Credit Gilad Rom / Flickr

Russian President Vladimir Putin criticized the West Thursday for refusing to declare Chechen militants terrorists and for offering them political and financial assistance in the past, in light of the revelation that Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had Chechen roots.

The U.S. has urged the Kremlin to seek a political settlement in Chechnya and provided humanitarian aid to the region during the two separatist wars that began in 1994.

"Violence and conflict has happened in Chechnya for centuries," University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Dean and KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot says. "This goes back to the 16th Century when there's been war after war after war. So it's been a volatile region for some time."

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

World Views: April 5, 2013

Listen to the entire April 5, 2013 episode

On Tuesday the U.N. General Assembly approved a treaty to regulate the global arms trade, and the panel explores what role the CIA is playing in Arab and Turkish military aid to Syria.

Ambassador Cynthia Schneider joins Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis to discuss how culture influenced her diplomacy while representing the United States in the Netherlands between 1998 and 2001.

World Views
12:47 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

What the U.N. Arms Treaty Will (or Won't) Accomplish

Members of a combined Afghan and coalition security force collected a cache of weapons after clearing a known Haqqani network foreign fighter encampment site in Paktika province, Afghanistan - July 21, 2011.
Credit isafmedia / Flickr

The U.N. General Assembly overwhelmingly approved the first international treaty regulating the multi-billion dollar global arms trade Tuesday.

Iran, North Korea and Syria voted "no" on Tuesday, while Russia and China, both major arms exporters, abstained.

Suzette Grillot is the co-author of the 2009 book The International Arms Trade. She says Syria opposed the treaty because it does nothing to prevent weapons from flowing to non-state actors, like the Syrian opposition.

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World Views
1:07 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Winners and Losers in the Cyprus Financial Crisis

Protesters gather outside the Cyprus Parliament in Nicosia - March 22, 2013.
Credit urbanlegend / Flickr

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the financial crisis in Cyprus - March 28, 2013.

Banks in Cyprus are open for normal business for the second day, but with strict restrictions on how much money their clients can access, after being shut down for nearly two weeks to prevent people from draining their accounts as the country's politicians sought a way out of an acute financial crisis.

"They were weakened by the fact that they had too many investments in Greek companies," said Suzette Grillot. "So they've become another victim of the Greek financial crisis."

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