sexual assault

The Tulsa County District Attorney's Office filed sodomy and rape charges against a 17-year-old boy in April 2015. The case was ultimately rejected.
Nmajdan / Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 3.0)

During a meeting of the House Conference Committee on Criminal Justice and Corrections on Wednesday, state Rep. Scott Biggs introduced a bill that would close a loophole in Oklahoma’s forcible sodomy law.

In March, criminal charges were dropped against a 17-year-old boy who was accused of forcing an intoxicated female classmate to perform oral sex.

The Tulsa County District Attorney's Office filed sodomy and rape charges against a 17-year-old boy in April 2015. The case was ultimately rejected.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

Update
State Rep. Scott Biggs, R-Chickasha, says he plans to amend a bill to include unconscious victims in Oklahoma's forcible sodomy law. In a news release, Biggs said, "“I am horrified by the idea that we would allow these depraved rapists to face a lower charge simply because the victim is unconscious. I think the judges made a grave error, but if they need more clarification, we are happy to give it to them by fixing the statute."

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Sexual assault survivors and agencies that advocate on their behalf gathered at the state capitol in Oklahoma City on Thursday to share their stories of sexual violence in Indian country.

American Indians are two and a half times more likely to experience sexual assault crimes compared to any other group, and one third of native women will be raped during her lifetime, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

Assignment: Radio March 29th, 2015

Mar 29, 2015
Jay Chilton

Sexual assault awareness month is just a few days away. Assignment: Radio’s Lydia Theban, Pamela Ortega, ECU’s Lisa Laxton and I found out that sexual violence touches the lives of people here in our community. Sexual assault prevention programs, personal stories and successes make up this weeks Assignment: Radio.

Oklahoma State Capitol
ensign_beedrill / Flickr Creative Commons

A proposal to force certain sex offenders in Oklahoma to undergo chemical castration as a condition of release from prison has failed in a state Senate committee.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 5-4 on Tuesday against the bill by Republican Sen. Mark Allen of Spiro.

Since this week is a deadline for bills to emerge from committee, the measure is likely dead for the session.

Oklahoma City Police Car
Paul L. McCord Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

Evidence against an Oklahoma City police officer accused of sexually assaulting 13 women while on patrol is scheduled to be made public in an Oklahoma County courtroom.

A preliminary hearing is scheduled Monday for 27-year-old Daniel Holtzclaw. Holtzclaw was arrested in August and faces a total of 32 charges including rape, sexual battery and stalking. Holtzclaw has pleaded not guilty.

The hearing will determine whether there is sufficient evidence that crimes have been committed and whether there is probable cause to believe that Holtzclaw committed them.

Adam S / Flickr.com

Freshmen are descending on college campuses and perhaps unknowingly entering the "red zone" — a period until Thanksgiving during which they are most vulnerable to sexual assault.

Thursday, the federal government sent a message that it's taking sexual harassment on college campuses seriously. Education officials released the names of 55 schools facing investigation for their handling of sexual abuse allegations.

Joshua Landis, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the fear in Japan that the amount of contaminated water at the Fukushima nuclear power plant is getting out of hand, and increasing number of attacks and violence against women in India.

Later, a conversation with about indigenous people and issues in Guatemala with Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

Ramesh Lalwani / Flickr Creative Commons

A fast-track court will give a verdict next week in the trial of four men accused in the gang rape and fatal beating of a woman on a New Delhi bus last year.

The assault caused nationwide outrage and forced the government to change rape laws and create fast-track courts for rape cases.

University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Dean Suzette Grillot says even though there’s outrage over the increasingly-common attacks against women, there’s not enough push to have an impact on the sentences these young men receive.

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