KGOU

State Department of Corrections

Joshua Combs
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

If you’re a state inmate and win cash in a lawsuit, the Department of Corrections has the right to pay debts on your behalf.

Joe Allbaugh
Greg Schaler / FEMA

A former director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency will be the new interim director of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

The Board of Corrections named Joe Allbaugh to the post at its meeting on Thursday in McAlester.

A sign advertising career opportunities at the prison in Helena, Oklahoma
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

 

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections Director Robert Patton announced his resignation earlier this month, and he’ll begin taking leave at the end of this week. Under his watch, the state gained national attention for multiple execution snafus. But Patton’s tenure goes beyond the death chamber.

Volatile Yards

Oklahoma Dept. of Corrections

The director of Oklahoma's prison system is the second high-ranking official to  step down amid an investigation into a series of botched executions in the  state. Department of Corrections Director Robert Patton announced this afternoon in a press release he will resign effective Jan. 31 and will begin taking accrued leave on Dec. 25. 

Charles Frederick Warner
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Autopsy records show Oklahoma death row inmate Charles Warner received the wrong drug during his January lethal injection.

Tim (Timothy) Pearce / Flickr.com

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections currently has 99 offenders categorized as fugitives, but most of those are from work-release programs, halfway houses or GPS monitoring.

Several Oklahoma fugitives, however, have escaped from medium- or maximum-security facilities, and some have been living on the run for decades.

Those include:

Kenneth Cook, now 85, convicted of first-degree manslaughter, who escaped from the Oklahoma State Reformatory in Granite on Nov. 24, 1986;

Oklahoma State Capitol
mrlaugh / Flickr

The 55th Oklahoma Legislature wrapped up its first session a little over two weeks ago on May 22, one week ahead of the constitutionally required deadline to adjourn.

Lawmakers passed bond issues for widely publicized museums in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa. But the $611 million shortfall in the state budget dominated the conversation from January to May, even though details of the $7.1 billion agreement didn't emerge until shortly before the gavel fell. To plug that gap, lawmakers cut most agency budgets by five to seven percent, and also used monies from the state's Rainy Day Fund and state agency revolving accounts.

What Budget Drama’s End May Mean For Key State Services

May 23, 2015
State Reps. Elise Hall (far right) and Katie Henke (center) applaud as the state House adjourns sine die Friday afternoon.
M. Scott Carter / Oklahoma Watch

The 55th session of the Oklahoma Legislature adjourned for the year late Friday afternoon, quietly ending four months’ worth of fighting over money, morals and museums.

For most of the session, a shadow hung over everything: a $611 million budget hole. 

Lawmakers chose to adjourn the session a week early, just days after they wrapped up work on the state’s $7.2 billion budget.

The budget cut funding to career and technology education, higher education and transportation. At the same time, more funds were steered to mental health services, public safety and the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. Even with budget hikes, however, key agencies said they would likely have to cut spending.

In a move that surprised many, the Legislature approved a $25 million bond issue for the beleaguered American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City and a second $25 million bond issue for a museum of popular culture in Tulsa.

Lawmakers also debated issues such as same-sex marriage.

The shrinking pool of money available for appropriation quickly became the session’s central theme.

In February, after the Board of Equalization certified a funding estimate millions below the 2014 prediction, lawmakers went into damage-control mode. They warned agency heads little money would be available for next year.

“We’ve been telling them all session there would be cuts,” said Rep. Dennis Casey, R-Morrison, vice-chairman of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee.

By May, agency directors were convinced.

Wesley Fryer / Flickr

Governor Mary Fallin signed legislation Monday allowing judicial discretion for a number of nonviolent crimes.

House Bill 1518, known as the Justice Safety Valve Act, permits judges to lessen mandatory minimum sentences when the term is “not necessary for the protection of the public” and could “result in substantial injustice to the defendant.”  

creationc / Stock.XCHNG

The Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals has upheld a district court ruling that it's unconstitutional to require counties to use county revenue to house state inmates in county jails.

The ruling on Wednesday comes in a lawsuit filed in 2013 by the Bryan County Board of Commissioners against the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. It challenged per diem rates paid for housing state prisoners.

The ruling says inmates are held in county jails on behalf of the state prison system, and the state constitution requires the state to fund the system.

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