Syria

World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

World Views: November 15, 2013

Listen to the entire November 15, 2013 episode.

A little over a week ago, Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines, leaving thousands dead and devastating the city of Tacloban. Suzette Grillot also talks with Joshua Landis about a so-called "wild card" in Syria's civil war - private funding by wealthy donors.

Later, Adriana Beltrán from the Washington Office on Latin America joins Suzette Grillot to discuss how clandestine criminal organizations infiltrate Guatemala’s judicial system.

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World Views
1:44 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

How Kuwait And Saudi Arabia Are Becoming A ‘Virtual Western Union’ For Syria’s Rebels

A man displays part of a mortar launched by the Syrian Army that destroyed the house behind him in al-Qsair - February 9, 2012
Credit Freedom House / Flickr Creative Commons

Private donors have contributed tens of millions of dollars to Islamist militias in Syria, dividing the opposition even further and forcing the United States to reexamine who it backs in the region.

The New York Times reports the practice is adding a “wild card” to the war in Syria.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Fri November 15, 2013

We Beheaded The Wrong Man, Syrian Terrorists Say

A member of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant urges Syrians in the city of Aleppo to fight against the Assad regime. This week, the militants apologized for beheading a commander from another anti-Assad group.
Karam al-Masri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:28 am

"Militant Islamist rebels in Syria ... have asked for 'understanding and forgiveness' for cutting off and putting on display the wrong man's head," The Telegraph reports.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

World Views: November 8, 2013

Listen to the entire November 8, 2013 episode.

Earlier this week anti-American protests in Iran marked 34 years since the storming of the Embassy in Tehran, and the start of the 18-month hostage crisis. Suzette Grillot talks about the anniversary with Joshua Landis, who also provides a brief update on Saudi Arabia's frustration with the U.S. over Syria.

Later, a conversation with Boston University modern European historian Jonathan Zatlin. He says parts of Europe's debt crisis can be explained by religious tension between the Protestant North and the Catholic South.

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World Views
11:49 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Two Things To Know About The Middle East This Week

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro, U.S. Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations Martin Indyk, and Deputy Special Envoy Frank Lowenstein about Middle East peace negotiations before departing Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel, en route to Geneva, Switzerland, on November 8, 2013.
Credit U.S. Department of State / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with "World Views" contributor Joshua Landis.

Four world powers are dispatching their top diplomats to Geneva on Friday to add their weight to negotiations aimed at putting initial limits on Iran's ability to make atomic weapons.

The meeting comes shortly after the 34th anniversary of the start of the Iran hostage crisis, and the end of diplomatic relations between the United States and the Islamic Republic.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, says the election of Hassan Rouhani earlier this year marks a crossroads as the moderate leader tries to promote understanding with the United States.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Thu October 31, 2013

Syria's Chemical Weapons Facilities Destroyed, Watchdog Says

In the northern Syrian city of Aleppo last month, there was a class about how to protect against chemical weapons attacks.
J.M. Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 9:15 am

A key deadline in the quest to rid Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime of its chemical weapons has been met, according to international observers.

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World Views
10:48 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR’s Kelly McEvers Drafts History, Documents Her Own Story In Syria

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews a U.S. soldier in the Middle East.
Glen Carey

Listen to the October 18, 2013 episode, with Suzette Grillot's conversation with NPR correspondent Kelly McEvers.

Kelly McEvers spent three years based in Baghdad and Beirut covering the Middle East for NPR. She started her assignment with instructions not to miss a day in Iraq as the 2011 U.S. troop withdrawal deadline approached.

“Then in late 2010, a guy set himself on fire in Tunisia, and everything changed,” McEvers told KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot. “I was swept up with millions of other people in this thing called the Arab Spring.”

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Oklahoma Voices
10:02 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Reporting On The Middle East: Syria And Egypt After The Arab Spring

Participants during an October 2, 2013 panel discussion about Syria, Egypt, and the Arab Spring. Left-to-right: NPR correspondent Kelly McEvers, Egyptian scholar Samer Shehata, Syria expert Joshua Landis, and KGOU's "World Views" host Suzette Grillot
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

NPR assigned correspondent Kelly McEvers to Iraq in 2010 with instructions not to miss a day ahead of the expected troop withdrawal by the end of 2011.

“Then in late 2010, a young man in Tunisia set himself on fire, and literally changed everything,” McEvers says. “At first I was watching it on TV in Baghdad, sitting there thinking, ‘Do we really have to stay in Baghdad? C’mon, you know? Put me in coach!’ asking to be sent out on the stories.”

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Parallels
2:48 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Syrians Are Widely Critical Of Nobel Peace Prize Decision

Men chat Thursday in front of badly damaged buildings in the central city of Homs. Many Syrians are critical of the Nobel Peace Prize that was announced Friday for the group that is in Syria to dismantle its chemical weapons program.
Yazan Homsy Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:54 pm

Many Syrians are frustrated, disappointed and generally upset that the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the group that recently arrived in the country to dismantle the government's chemical weapons.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is a small, low-key outfit that has been placed in the international spotlight with its Syria mission and now a Nobel Prize.

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Parallels
8:57 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Why The U.S. Needs Bashar Assad To Stay For Now

President Obama is no longer calling for the ouster of Syrian President Bashar Assad, as the U.S. presses him to dismantle his stockpile of chemical weapons. Assad is shown here on Sept. 8.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:57 am

Throughout the Syrian war, President Obama has insisted that President Bashar Assad must go. But now, the U.S. may want, or even need, Assad to remain in power for a while longer so he can oversee the dismantling of his chemical weapons stockpile.

"For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for President Assad to step aside," Obama said back on Aug. 18, 2011, in his first explicit call for Assad's ouster, something the U.S. president went on to repeat on multiple occasions.

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