KGOU

Terri White

Oklahoma Watch

The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services announced it will be forced to cut half of its services if lawmakers don’t fix the state’s budget.

State Mental Health And Substance Abuse Agency May Cut All Outpatient Service

Oct 18, 2017
Commissioner Terri White of the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

As the state legislature continue to look for solutions to fill a $215 million budget gap, one state agency outlined how it will deal with the loss of nearly one quarter of its budget.

Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services commissioner Terri White discusses mid-year fiscal cuts on March 25, 2016.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is the latest state agency to unveil details about how Oklahoma’s revenue failures will affect its bottom line.

The department announced during its March board meeting Friday morning it will trim an additional $13 million for the current fiscal year that ends June 30. That brings the total amount of cuts since January to $22.8 million, and ODMHSAS says more than 73,000 Oklahomans will notice the effects.

So what does that mean? Three things:

Oklahoma Watch executive editor David Fritze, Oklahoma Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services commissioner Terri White, and Oklahoma Health Care Authority CEO Nico Gomez.
Patrick Roberts / KGOU

At the Oklahoma Watch-Out public forum last month, two prominent state health officials described the impact the state budget crisis and the oil-and-gas downturn could have on residents' physical and mental health.

As the Legislature prepares to assemble in February, the state’s two primary agencies that deal with health care for the impoverished and the mentally ill are bracing for cuts to services. At the same time, losses of jobs threaten to strain physical and emotional health for families at all income levels.

Terri White, Commissioner, The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.
ok.gov

State mental health commissioner Terri White has apologized to a judge who threatened to hold her in contempt-of-court because a mentally ill defendant did not get treatment for six months.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that White promised during a meeting Friday that the judge would be notified if competency treatment cannot be provided for a defendant within a reasonable time.

District Judge Ray C. Elliot dismissed a contempt-of-court proceeding against White after the meeting.

Terri White, Commissioner, The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.
ok.gov

An Oklahoma County judge threatened to jail the state's mental health commissioner for ignoring a written order to commit an inmate to a state mental health facility.

The Oklahoman reports that District Judge Ray C. Elliot admonished commissioner Terri White for not transferring 35-year-old Ricky Norman Edwards to the Oklahoma Forensic Center in Vinita as per his July 24 order.

The inmate was transferred this week after a contempt-of-court hearing was scheduled for White.

Mental Health Agency Hopes For No Funding Cuts

Jan 25, 2015
Terri White, Commissioner, The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.
ok.gov

The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) Commissioner Terri White said she is hopeful the agency will be one of the few not receiving budget cuts this legislative session at a board meeting on Friday.

White hopes the support from Governor Mary Fallin will ensure a stable budget for the agency in the nest fiscal year.

In her inaugural speech, Fallin noted three of her priority areas: educational attainment, over-incarceration and health.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A new federal report says that Oklahoma is ranked 11th in the nation in alcohol poisoning deaths from 2010 through 2012.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention released its latest analysis Tuesday. Its report shows that Oklahoma saw an average of 37 residents die from alcohol poisoning per year.