KGOU

Turkey

A Turkish police officer patrols as pro-government supporters, gather on Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency, endorsing new powers for Turkey's President Erdogan.
Petros Giannakouris / AP

A week after the beginning of a failed coup in Turkey, there are still so many unanswered questions about who was behind it and what’s next for the country that’s long walked a tightrope between religion and secularism.

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss last weekend’s failed coup attempt in Turkey. Hundreds of people died during the uprising, and tens of thousands were arrested during this week’s crackdown.

Then we'll hear a conversation with World Neighbors' Southeast Asia representative Edd Wright. Ever since the 2004 tsunami, he’s been trying to make sure Indonesia is prepared for another catastrophe.

Two riverine command boats like this one were taken into custody by Iran, along with 10 U.S. sailors.
MC2 Ecklund / U.S. Navy

Earlier this week Turkey attacked Islamic State forces in Iraq and Syria after a suicide bombing in Istanbul that killed 10 tourists. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the tank and artillery attack killed nearly 200 militants.

Historian Beeta Baghoolizadeh says 19th century Iranian slavery can appear softer alongside its American counterpart, but that’s not a fair comparison. She'll trace the country's history of slavery and its erasure from the national consciousness.

But first, Joshua Landis joins the show again for a discussion of the Russian airliner that crashed in Egypt and what may have caused it, and Turkey’s recent parliamentary elections.

Aftermath of an attack by a group of AKP supporters on the Hürriyet newspaper headquarters in September 2015.
Hilmi Hacaloğlu / Voice of America

On Sunday, Turkey’s ruling AKP party surpassed expectations and regained its majority in the country’s parliament. But the elections have been marred by violence and suppression of the media, and Turkey has been dealing with external problems along its Syrian border as refugees continue to flood into the country to escape the civil war.

Suzette Grillot is still in Turkey, and talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir again this week about Saturday's bombing in Ankara, and the response from the government and everyday Turks.

Then Suzette explores some of the parallels between Brazil’s military dictatorships, and the country’s LGBTQ subculture in the 20th century with Brown University historian James Green. They'll also discuss evolving U.S. opposition to Brazil’s military junta in the 1960s and 70s.

Protesters on the streets of Izmir, Turkey Ocotber 10, 2015 after the bombing in Ankara earlier in the day.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Saturday’s bombing at a peace rally in Ankara – and related protests across the country – have united citizens in their frustration with Turkey’s leadership even as government officials say the attacks were intended to widen fissures and stir discontent in the country that straddles Europe and Asia.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about how the millions of refugees streaming into Syria are affecting daily life in Istanbul, and could impact parlimentary elections weeks from now.

Then, a conversation about business ethics and responsibility in the developing world with Melike Yetken. She works with the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

A vendor sells coffee in the Turkish city of Izmir - September 21, 2015.
Charles Roffey / Flickr

No country has been more affected by the crisis of migrants and refugees fleeing Syrian than its northern neighbor, Turkey.

Millions of Syrians have escaped into Turkey, with hundreds of thousands in Istanbul alone – dwarfing the numbers seen in Europe.

Joshua Landis provides an update on two stories he's following in the Middle East: the different reactions to the nuclear deal with Iran, and news that Syrian soldiers trained and equipped by the U.S. in Turkey were captured and killed as they crossed the border into Syria.

Then Suzette talks with Joe Masco, an anthropologist at the University of Chicago who studies the evolution of the national security state. His latest book traces surveillance and privacy issues from the start of the Cold War to what he now calls the “post-privacy era.”

Pages