Turkey

World Views
2:36 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

VIDEO: Oklahomans With First-Hand Accounts Of Protests In Turkey

Protesters gather in Ankara, Turkey on Monday, June 3 2013
Suzette Grillot KGOU

Monday marked the fourth day that riot police used tear gas in Istanbul and Ankara against protesters.

Demonstrations started Friday over plans to rip out trees and redevelop an area of Taksim Square in Istanbul, but quickly spread as urban, secular Turks vented frustration that prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan is an authoritarian figure who wants to force his religious outlook on them.

KGOU's World Views host Suzette Grillot is in Ankara leading the University of Oklahoma College of International Studies "Journey to Turkey" program.

"We are half-a-mile away from the protests in Ankara – we can hear them from our hotel,” Grillot says.  “But interestingly, life continues as usual outside the protest areas with people shopping and eating at outdoor cafes with little interest in what is happening."

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Mon June 3, 2013

In Turkey, Protesters Say Prime Minister Has Gone Too Far

The scene at one of the protests in Istanbul early Monday.
Ahmet Sik EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:30 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul

After more violence overnight, protesters and police clashed again in Istanbul on Monday. As the BBC writes:

"Police used tear gas to stop a group of demonstrators marching on the prime minister's office in Istanbul, the private Dogan news agency reports."

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

World Views: May 31, 2013

Listen to the entire May 31, 2013 episode

Suzette Grillot reports from Antalya, Turkey, where she speaks with Middle East expert Joshua Landis about Turkey’s booming economy and domestic anxieties.

Desmond Shawe-Taylor and Anna Somers Cocks join the program to discuss art appreciation in the 21st century. Shawe-Taylor is the Surveyor of The Queen’s Pictures, overseeing nearly 7,000 oil paintings and 3,000 miniatures from the British Royal Collection. Somers Cocks is the founding editor and CEO of The Art Newspaper.

World Views
11:52 am
Thu May 30, 2013

How Turkey Became The Nicest House In A Rough Neighborhood

The Golden Horn and Bosporus from the Suleiman Mosque, Istanbul.
Joshua Landis Facebook

Over the last decade, Turkey has averaged at least five percent growth of gross domestic product per year with a per capita income now more than $17,000, according to the country’s Ministry of Finance.

Those numbers are only expected to rise, even as a revolution continues to boil over next door in Syria, Iran faces severe economic sanctions, and economies in Greece and Cyprus melt down.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, says after Turkey’s attempt to join the European Union failed, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan forged a new path, facing neither East nor West.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

World Views: May 24, 2013

Listen to the entire May 24, 2013 episode

Suzette Grillot reports from Istanbul, where she speaks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about the international response to Monday's deadly tornado in Moore, Okla., and political problems facing Turkey.

University of Oregon political scientist Richard Kraus joins the program for a conversation about how art and culture become a testing ground between the United States and China. He's the author of author of Pianos and Politics in China: Middle-Class Ambitions and the Struggle over Western Music.

World Views
3:46 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

As Syrian Conflict Intensifies, Turkey Fears Renewed Civil Violence

Turkish protesters chant slogans during a demonstration against the government of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad at Beyazit Square in Istanbul, on March 18, 2012
Credit FreedomHouse2 / Flickr

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Firat Demir.

After decades of fighting, the conflict between the Kurdish nationalist group the PKK and the Turkish government finally drew to a close with a ceasefire in March.

Peace in Turkey may be short-lived, though. Violence in neighboring Syria is steadily intensifying, forcing a reluctant Turkey to respond and possibly putting citizens at risk.

“Most people among the Kurdish population are very optimistic,” says Firat Demir, a University of Oklahoma economist. “The last thing now that a citizen of Turkey wants is to have another civil conflict after this 80-year-old bloody conflict that is ending.”

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World Views
12:45 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Across The World, Citizens Empathize With Moore

Stella and Jack Howard (left and right) with their daughter, Dawnelaina (center), sit with the remains of their Moore home. The Howards built this house after their last one was destroyed by the May 3, 1999, twister.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Firat Demir about Turkey's reaction to the May 20 Moore tornado.

From Italy to Istanbul, the tragedy in Moore isn’t far from many people's minds or the front pages of international newspapers.

"We have received an amazing outpouring here from the mayor to regular citizens stopping by to see how they can help," says Rebecca Cruise, who's visiting the University of Oklahoma's center in Arezzo, Italy. "The emails from faculty with students abroad also show how much the world is paying attention to this story."

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World Views
1:07 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Winners and Losers in the Cyprus Financial Crisis

Protesters gather outside the Cyprus Parliament in Nicosia - March 22, 2013.
Credit urbanlegend / Flickr

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the financial crisis in Cyprus - March 28, 2013.

Banks in Cyprus are open for normal business for the second day, but with strict restrictions on how much money their clients can access, after being shut down for nearly two weeks to prevent people from draining their accounts as the country's politicians sought a way out of an acute financial crisis.

"They were weakened by the fact that they had too many investments in Greek companies," said Suzette Grillot. "So they've become another victim of the Greek financial crisis."

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