KGOU

U.S. State Department

University of Oklahoma Diplomat In Residence Rob Andrew
Provided

Despite its location in a landlocked, central state, the University of Oklahoma’s serves as the home base for Rob Andrew, the U.S. State Department’s Diplomat in Residence for the Central U.S. region.

He grew up in an internationally engaged family - Andrew’s mother is Canadian. His earlier career as a U.S. Army officer who served in the Middle East during the first Gulf War eventually led him to the Foreign Service.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the terrorist attack in Istanbul, and some of the security issues these types of attacks continue.

Later, a conversation with Ambassador John Limbert He and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. Many were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

A group photograph of the former Iranian hostages shortly after their release. The 52 Americans spent a few days in the hospital prior to their departure for the United States.
Johnson Babela / U.S. Department of Defense

Editor's Note: This interview was originally broadcast January 14, 2014

Ambassador John Limbert and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. They were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

Rebecca Cruise provides an update on this week's climate talks in Paris, and Joshua Landis discusses the British Parliament's vote to increase the country's involvement in Syria.

Then, retired diplomat Joe Cassidy talks about his 25-year career in the Foreign Service. In July, he wrote an editorial in Foreign Policy magazine with his prescription to fix the ailing U.S. State Department.

Flags outside the United Nations headquarters in New York.
Aotearoa / Wikimedia Commons

The State Department Joe Cassidy began working for in 1989 was very different than the one he left earlier this year.

He started his career before the Berlin Wall fell, and retired in May after 25 years in the Foreign Service. The U.S. is now embroiled in a Syrian quagmire with broad geopolitical implications, and no resolution on the horizon. He’s also seen the fall of the Soviet Union and the resurgence of Russia under a powerful leader who wants his country to become a major international player.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about how the millions of refugees streaming into Syria are affecting daily life in Istanbul, and could impact parlimentary elections weeks from now.

Then, a conversation about business ethics and responsibility in the developing world with Melike Yetken. She works with the U.S. State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

Melike Yetken speaking at an April 23, 2015 policy forum at American University that looked at how NGOs and government agencies are collaborating with the private sector to help solve poverty and development-related public policy problems.
American University - School of Public Affairs / Flickr

Last year President Obama announced a National Action Plan that would follow United Nations guidelines to promote responsible business practices and human rights around the world.

Joshua Landis discusses Israel’s disappointment with remarks Secretary of State John Kerry made regarding Middle East peace talks, and Rebecca Cruise explains why the 20th anniversary of Rwanda's genocide has rekindled tension with France.

Later, a conversation with Yale Law School professor and former State Department legal advisor Harold Koh about some of the practical aspects of international law.

TSGT Scott Reed / U.S. Air Force

International law impacts the behavior of both national governments and international non-state actors, governing things like the use of drones and military technology. But the effects can also be felt on an individual level – in everything from financial transactions to luggage protection and free-travel visas in the European Union.

World Views host Suzette Grillot and contributor Rebecca Cruise continue producing the program from the road, and spent this week in the United Arab Emirates.

Later, a conversation with Ambassador John Limbert to mark the 33rd anniversary of the end of the Iran hostage crisis. Limbert and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. They were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

A group photograph of the former Iranian hostages shortly after their release. The 52 Americans spent a few days in the hospital prior to their departure for the United States.
Johnson Babela / U.S. Department of Defense

Ambassador John Limbert and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. They were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

Limbert has never been back to Iran in the 33 years after he boarded the plane for Algeria, even though he married an Iranian woman and his children were born there. He’s now a private citizen, no longer works for the State Department, and has no prohibition on his travel to Iran. But he says he’s not welcome by the Islamic Republic.

Loren / Wikimedia Commons

Last week U.S. embassies and consulates across the Middle East and North Africa closed in response to an intercepted message among senior al-Qaeda operatives.

This threat highlights the important, and precarious, position of U.S. diplomatic missions overseas.

Veteran diplomat Michael Yoder has spent more than 20 years as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer. During this time, he has served in eight countries including Mexico, Poland, India, and Uzbekistan.

U.S. Rep. James Lankford (R-OK5) was one of several members of Congress today questioning three top diplomats about September's deadly assault on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya.

U.S. State Department foreign service officer and former deputy chief of mission in Libya Gregory Hicks told Lankford the only person who can waive security requirements for high-risk, high threat locations is the Secretary of State.

O. Louis Guglielmi / artinterrupted.org

On March 2, the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art opened a recently-reassembled exhibit of modern American art the U.S. State Department recalled from an overseas tour in the 1940’s.