women

Science and Technology
1:30 pm
Wed September 3, 2014

Move Over Barbie, Here Comes Madame Curie

Miss Possible is designing dolls based on real women, that come with apps to explore their work. (Miss Possible)

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 1:25 pm

Two young women who studied engineering at the University of Illinois want to inspire girls to become scientists by offering dolls based on real people, like Nobel Prize-winning chemist and physicist Marie Curie.

Janna Eaves and Supriya Hobbs founded the Miss Possible company to offer an alternative to Barbie or American Girl dolls.

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Website Released Results Monday
12:19 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

Oklahoma Ranks Sixth Worst State For Gender Equality In The Workplace

Credit Visnu Pitiyanuvath / Flickr.com

Oklahoma has been ranked the sixth worst state in the U.S. for women's equality.

Wallethub.com released its 2014 list of best and worst states for gender equality on Monday. The personal finance social network complied data from the census and various federal agencies.

The website used 10 primary metrics such as average life expectancies and the gap in the number of male and female business executives.

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Oklahoma News
6:30 am
Sun August 24, 2014

Panel Says More Women Needed In Oklahoma Politics

Former Lt. Governor, Jari Askins.
Credit Margo Wright / Wikimedia Commons

A group of women who have held public office in Oklahoma say it is important for more women to become involved in politics.

At a meeting of the Norman Chamber of Commerce on Friday, the women set aside politics to underscore the need to add women's opinions and viewpoints to the public debate.

Former Lt. Gov. Jari Askins says state decisions that impact families need to have a female perspective.

State Rep. Leslie Osborn says there is no glass ceiling at the Legislature, but that not enough women are running for office.

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State Capitol
12:21 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Senate Targets Oklahoma's High Female Lockup Rate

Credit mikecogh / Flickr Creative Commons

A plan to target Oklahoma's highest-in-the-nation female incarceration rate with a prison diversion pilot program in Tulsa has unanimously passed the Oklahoma Senate.

The Senate voted Wednesday for the bill by Republican Sen. Kim David of Porter that targets women convicted of drug or other nonviolent crimes. David says female offenders first must enter a plea of guilty, which a judge can withhold and waive if the woman completes the 12-to-18-month program.

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Business and Economy
2:20 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Report: Oklahoma Women Earn 83 Percent Compared To Male Counterparts

In 2012, Oklahoma women who were full-time workers had median weekly earnings of $631 or 83.0 percent of the $760 full-time median weekly earnings of Oklahoma men.
Credit Southwest Information Office / Bureau of Labor Statistics

A report out Tuesday from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows women in Oklahoma earned 83 percent of their male counterparts during 2012.

The study looked at the median weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers. That figure is slightly above the nationwide average of women earning 80.9 percent compared to men.

The BLS says the ratio of women's-to-men's earnings fluctuated around 75 percent from 2004 to 2008, until reaching a high of 87.9 percent in 2009.

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Parallels
7:59 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Five Things You May Not Know About Child Marriage

Arinafe Makwiti, 13, says her parents forced her to drop out of school and get married to an older man last year to help with the family finances. Makwiti has divorced her husband, but now has a 9-month-old daughter.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 9:40 am

NPR's Jennifer Ludden recently traveled to the African nation of Malawi, one of many countries in the developing world where child marriage remains prevalent. She found girls like Christina Asima, who was married at 12 and became a mother at 13. She is now divorced and caring for her infant son on her own. You can read Jennifer's full report here. Below are a few more things she learned while reporting on child marriage.

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Parallels
3:26 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Like Food And Water, Women's Safety A Priority For Relief Aid

A mother breastfeeds her baby inside a chapel that was turned into a makeshift hospital after Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines.
John Lavellana Reuters/Landov

In natural disasters and war zones, food and water aren't the only basic needs, aid and human rights groups say.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

World Views: November 1, 2013

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the implications of the Roma child found living with a couple in Greece, and the October 26 protest by Saudi women in defiance of the country's traditions against driving.

Later, a conversation about water and sanitation in Africa with the University of Oklahoma 2013 International Water Prize winner Ada Oko-Williams, and University College London hydrogeologist Richard Taylor.

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World Views
2:52 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Saudi Arabia Warns Online Backers Of Women Drivers

Credit Edward Musiak / Flickr Creative Commons

On October 26 dozens of Saudi women got behind the wheel in defiance of the country’s traditions. Though no specific law bans women from driving, the rules are enforced by Saudi Arabia's powerful Islamic establishment.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, says even though the issue seems to be gaining traction, she’s heard critics argue it’s symbolic of larger issues Saudi women face.

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World Views
10:48 am
Fri October 18, 2013

NPR’s Kelly McEvers Drafts History, Documents Her Own Story In Syria

NPR's Kelly McEvers interviews a U.S. soldier in the Middle East.
Glen Carey

Kelly McEvers spent three years based in Baghdad and Beirut covering the Middle East for NPR. She started her assignment with instructions not to miss a day in Iraq as the 2011 U.S. troop withdrawal deadline approached.

“Then in late 2010, a guy set himself on fire in Tunisia, and everything changed,” McEvers told KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot. “I was swept up with millions of other people in this thing called the Arab Spring.”

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