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In a news conference last week about his cancer diagnosis, President Jimmy Carter said one thing he’d like The Carter Center to achieve in his lifetime is the eradication of the guinea worm.

There are now only 11 guinea worm cases left in the world, compared to 3.6 million cases when The Carter Center started its eradication project in 1986. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with the man who has led the effort since the start: Dr. Donald Hopkins.

In March 2011, photojournalist Lynsey Addario was kidnapped in Libya while covering the fighting between dictator Moammar Gadhafi's troops and rebel forces. She was with Anthony Shadid, Tyler Hicks and Stephen Farrell in the town of Ajdabiya, all on assignment for The New York Times.

Looking back, Addario says she had a premonition that something bad would happen.

China's Pork Feeds People And Economies

Feb 10, 2015

More than half of the world’s pigs are in China. In 2012, farmers there produced more than 50 million metric tons of pork – five times the amount produced by the United States.

The growing industrialization of pig farming is putting small farmers out of business and it’s creating soil and water pollution.

The demand for grain to include in animal feed dramatically increased exports to China from South America and around the world.

It’s summertime in Australia, and bushfires are always a problem. But this season it’s been really bad — the worst in more than three decades if you measure by area burned.

There have been no human fatalities, but the fire has taken a heavy toll on wildlife. Many animals have been killed, others badly injured.

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the turmoil in Iraq caused by ISIS. Rebecca Cruise reports on state of Ukraine and its possible cease fire with Russia.

Later in the program, an interview with Boston College Near East Historian and political scientist Franck Salameh about the many dialects of Arabic and the future of teaching it.

Arabic Keyboard
Francesco_G / Flickr Creative Commons

The beheadings of American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff by the radical group the Islamic State, and continued tensions in Gaza reignite long-standing questions about why there’s so much tumult in the region.

War reporting is dangerous. We were reminded of that today with the news that journalist Steven Sotloff has apparently been beheaded by an Islamic State militant.

The video of the beheading follows another, last month, of journalist James Foley being killed by a militant from the same group, also known as ISIS.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma junior Amanda Tomlinson about the speech in Arabic she gave at the United Nations General Assembly this summer and the importance of multilingualism.

Later in the program, an interview with Pakistani actor Iqbal Theba about his role on the TV show Glee, and the role of race in the entertainment industry.

Narendra Modi, who swept into power in May, used the country’s Independence Day to make some unprecedented public comments about sexual assault. He called on parents to treat their sons and daughters equally, and teach them the difference between right and wrong.

A fatal gang rape on a bus in Dehli in 2012 caused outrage in a country that has been inured to sexual violence against women. But the outrage sparked new and tougher prison terms for rapists, and Prime Minister Modi is trying to keep the progress on that issue moving.

In April, an investigation by the Associated Press revealed that the U.S. Agency For International Development (USAID) had created a Twitter-like company in Cuba. The goal was to undermine the Cuban government by giving disgruntled citizens the tools to more easily organize and communicate.

The two American missionaries infected with Ebola in Liberia have received an experimental serum, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health, one of the county’s top infectious disease experts.

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol of Samaritan’s Purse took the experimental treatment in Liberia, and Brantly reportedly saw his condition reverse within the hour.

However Fauci told Here & Now’s Robin Young that he’s skeptical of so-called “medical miracles.”