KGOU

World Views

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

Ukraine has been in conflict since 2014, when President Viktor Yanukovych fled the country, and Russian troops annexed the Crimea region. Fighting has been off-and-on ever since, with Russian-armed separatists in the eastern Ukraine region of Donbass fighting against pro-government forces. The Council on Foreign Relations estimates over 9,600 people have been killed in the violence, and 1.1 million Ukrainians have become migrants or refugees.

 

Austria confronted its Nazi past much later than Germany, and one scholar believes that’s why Austria was one of the first European countries to embrace right-wing and populist politics in 1980s and 90s.

Somali refugees wait outside a UNHCR processing center at a refugee camp outside Dadaab, eastern Kenya, on Aug. 5, 2011. Climate change contributed to low rain levels in East Africa in 2011, making global warming one of the causes of Somalia's famine.
Jerome Delay / AP

 

Interactions between humans and the environment is a two-way street. Human actions change the environment, and changes to the environment affect human behavior.

David Lopez-Carr, a geographer a the University of California-Santa Barbara, calls it “human environment dynamics.” He studies how climate change impacts food security, crop production and human health, particularly infant mortality.

 

“Babies and infants are the hardest hit when there is when there are food shortages,” Lopez-Carr told KGOU’s World Views.

Ambassador Hamdullah Mohib
The Embassy of Afghanistan

 

Like many young Afghans, Ambassador Hamdullah Mohib has lived in a country that has been at war most of his life. Born in 1983, Ambassador Mohib stressed that he and Afghanistan's young population as a whole have benefited from the relative stability brought to the country by the arrival of U.S. troops in 2001. But this stability only came after Afghanistan lurched from monarchy to communism to anarchy and then to extremism and finally to democracy over the decades.

 

http://saragoldrickrab.com/

More people want to pursue higher education now in the United States, and more students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds want to go to college or university. Even though a desire to achieve higher education is greater, it has also created enormous problems, according to Temple University education and sociology professor Sara Goldrick-Rab.

This satellite image released by the U.S. Department of Defense shows a damage assessment image of Shayrat air base in Syria, following U.S. Tomahawk Land Attack Missile strikes on Friday, April 7, 2017.
DigitalGlobe/U.S. Department of Defense via AP

 

American forces launched over 50 missiles at a Syrian air base Thursday night, to retaliate against the Bashar Assad regime’s use of chemical weapons.

Joshua Landis, the director of the University of Oklahoma’s Center for Middle East Studies, told KGOU’s World Views he doesn’t expect President Donald Trump to get involved in regime change.

“Regime change would not be good for America,” Landis said.

World Views: April 7, 2017

Apr 7, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the President Trump's strike against Syria, following Bashar Assad's apparent use of chemical weapons.

Then, Suzette talks with Mosaic Theater founding artistic director Ari Roth about inclusion in the theater and plays from conflict zones.

In this Wednesday, June 8, 2011 file photo, sun sets behind an oil pump in the desert oil fields of Sakhir, Bahrain.
Hasan Jamali / AP

 

In 2003, Mike Stice was the chairman of the National Petroleum Council’s supply committee. They reached a consensus on the status of oil in the United States: The country was out of oil and gas.

“Of course, you can see today, we were so wrong,” Stice said.

Now the dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of Earth and Energy, Stice says emerging technologies, such as hydraulic fracturing, have created a whole new supply of oil and gas in the United States.

 

 

As an oil-rich country on the border of Southeast Europe, Asia and the Middle East, Azerbaijan has drawn from a variety of cultures and influences.

Azerbaijan is the only country to border both Iran and Russia. Other neighbors include Georgia, Turkey and Armenia.

Its location makes it a cross roads.

 

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the outcomes of the Dutch elections, and a food poisoning case that has sickened thousands of children in Egypt.

Then, Rebecca interviews historian Rochelle Ruthchild about the women’s movement in Russia and the Soviet Union. Ruthchild wrote the book Equality and Revolution: Women’s Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905-1917. She’s also a member of The 888 Women’s History Project, which recently produced the documentary film Left On Pearl about the 1971 International Women’s Day March in Boston.

Suzette Grillot talks to Joshua Landis about the latest in Syria.

Then, Suzette interviews Andrew Horton about his new documentary Laughter Without Borders. The film tells the story of clowns who visit children in stressed environments, like refugee camps.

Jan Damm, left; Sabine Choucair, center; and Kolleen Kintz, back perform in Greece for Clowns Without Borders.
Clowns Without Borders

 

 

Andrew Horton believes the best way to understand a country’s people is to learn what makes them laugh.

“Laughter crosses borders,” he says.

Narges Bajoghli

 

 

The Iranian regime faces a daunting puzzle: How to translate the ideals of the 1979 revolution to a new generation.

That question launched Narges Bajoghli into her research in Iran, which focuses on pro-revolution communication.

“In Iran this is an important question because over 75 percent of the population is under the age of 35, meaning they don't remember the revolution,” Bajoghli said.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talks about nominees in the Best Foreign Language films category at the 2017 Oscars.

Then, Joshua Landis discusses Iran with Narges Bajoghli, an anthropologist and filmmaker. She’s a researcher in International Public Affairs at the Watson Institute at Brown University.

Nadim Shehadi

 

During the 20th century, countries in the Middle East developed strong, nationalist states that created a homogenous model for their societies. Lebanon, however, did not follow suit. As Middle East expert Nadim Shehadi likes to say, Lebanon skipped the 20th century altogether.

World Views: February 17, 2017

Feb 17, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the future of the two-state solution in Israel.

Then Suzette speaks with Nadim Shehadi, director of the Fares Center for Easter Mediterranean Studies at Tufts University. They discuss Lebanon's relative stability in a region that is engulfed in conflict.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about ongoing protests in Romania.

Then, Suzette interviews Orville Schell about China's relationship with the world. Schell is an award-winning journalist and former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at University of California-Berkeley.

Schell: U.S. And Chinese Cooperation Essential For The World

Feb 10, 2017
Orvville Schell
The Asia Society

 

As a college student, China was something of a forbidden land for Orville Schell. He was mystified by the Chinese language, but found it difficult to find a good language course in the United States.

“It was a bit of a terra incognita,” Schell said. “I think the very fact that I couldn't go there was most interesting to me.”

An informal settlement in Zambia, taken during John Harris' 2014 trip.
David Boeck

 

Urbanization is rapidly expanding on a global scale, and it is creating a demand for reorganization of cities and spaces. Urban and regional planners, like John Harris, weigh the different needs of societies to ensure the city suits the people who live in it. Harris focuses on sustainable urbanization, especially in Africa where he has dealt with informal settlements.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about President Trump's executive order that pauses the resettlement of refugees in the United States and bans travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Then, Suzette talks with John Harris about sustainable development and informal communities in Africa.

Pages