KGOU

World War I

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders. He'll talk with Suzette Grillot about what it would take for a new generation of intergovernmental organization like what happened after World War II.

But first, she'll be joined by University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith to talk about what’s next for the United Kingdom and the European Union two weeks after the “Brexit” vote.

Thomas Weiss addressing a retreat of UN under-secretaries-general on “The Imperative of Change” at the World Economic Forum, Geneva, April 6, 2016.
Sallysharif / Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders.

“Whether it’s climate change, terrorism, proliferation, Ebola, it simply is impossible for states, no matter how powerful or un-powerful, to address these problems,” Weiss told KGOU’s World Views.

The Ottoman surrender of Jerusalem to the British on December 9, 1917.
Wikimedia Commons

 

The first World War’s impact on the Middle East was significant, but the aftermath of the war shaped the region as we know it today.

The partition of the Ottoman Empire was arrived at through the process of wartime diplomacy, according to Eugene Rogan, a historian at Oxford University who spoke at the University of Oklahoma’s Teach-In on the First World War on March 7.

Russia staked a claim to Istanbul and waterways linking the Black Sea to the Mediterranean. The French claimed Syria and Cilicia in modern day southeastern Turkey.

United States Secretary of War Newton Baker pulls the first draft number on July 20, 1917
U.S. National Archives

 

Not long before America’s entrance into World War I, James Montgomery Flagg, one of the nation’s most successful illustrators, worked on a cover photo for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly newspaper. Flagg hastily drew the image of Uncle Sam, which he borrowed from a British recruitment poster. It would be adopted by the U.S. government as a recruiting tool and would go on to endure as an iconic symbol of American patriotism.

Two major centennial anniversaries took place this week. April 24th marks Genocide Remembrance Day to commemorate the massacre of millions of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire, and Wednesday was the 100th anniversary of the first widespread use of chemical weapons on World War I’s Western front.

Later, Rebecca Cruise talks with Asma Uddin. She started the online magazine Altmuslimah as a forum for issues of gender in Islam, but it resonated across many faiths.

A poison gas attack using gas cylinders in World War I
Tartalizza / Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday marked 100 years since the first widespread use of chemical weapons on the Western Front of World War I.

On April 22, 1915 during the Second Battle of Ypres in Belgium, German troops released hundreds of tons of chlorine gas toward French soldiers, killing thousands within 10 minutes. It was a horrific way to die – many suffocated on their own lungs and were blinded as the acidic compound destroyed moist tissue.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss President Obama’s recent trip to India, and this week’s legislative elections in Greece that saw huge left-wing parliamentary gains and a new coalition government.

Then University of New Hampshire historian Nicoletta Gullace discusses her work tracing how changing turn-of-the-century gender roles led to women's increased participation in war activities.

Two nurses tend to wounded inside an ambulance-train ward, France, during World War I. Ambulance trains were used in the main to transport large groups of soldiers to the French coast so that they could return to England for treatment.
David McLellan / National Library of Scotland

The demands of two world wars and changing gender roles opened the way for women to gain more rights as citizens in the United States and Britain.

Before the 20th century, women in the United States and Britain couldn’t vote in national elections and generally weren’t seen as key players in war efforts. With the professionalization of military nursing during the Crimean War, women’s participation in war efforts grew and paved the way for women’s heavy involvement between 1914 and 1918.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie about West Africa's worst Ebola outbreak in history, and Monday's anniversary of Britain's entry into World War I.

Later, a conversation about education and development in Africa with OU economist and international and area studies professor Moussa Blimpo.

Government of the United Kingdom / Wikimedia Commons

Monday marked 100 years since the British declared war on Germany, after the Germans ignored Belgium’s refusal to allow troops to pass through its borders to France.

Four years and 16 million lives later, World War I set the stage for the rest of the 20th century. A century later, University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie says the hot points of global conflict in the 21st century can be traced to the consequences of “the Great War” in Europe and Asia.