KGOU

Xi Jinping

U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping arrive for the state dinner with the first ladies at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017.
Thomas Peter / Pool Photo via AP

The relationship between China and the United States is difficult, but there is a chance for a harmonious path forward.

Suzette Grillot talks with Thomas Fingar, the former head of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research. In the months leading up to the 2003 invasion, he cast doubts on whether or not Iraq had nuclear weapons.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis discuss President Obama’s meetings with Chinese president Xi Jinping about cybersecurity, and Russian president Vladimir Putin over renewed tension in Syria.

President Barack Obama presents President Xi Jinping of the People's Republic of China with a gift of an inscribed redwood park bench at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif., June 8, 2013.
Pete Souza / The White House

President Obama and Chinese president Xi Jinping are meeting this week to discuss an arms deal for cyberspace. It’s the first of its kind – an agreement not to use cyber weapons to attack each other’s infrastructure. The move would protect things like medical facilities, cell phone towers, banking systems, and power grids.

India's prime minister Narendra Modi greets Chinese President Xi Jinping, September 17, 2014
Narendra Modi / Flickr

China’s President Xi Jinping paid a three-day visit to India this week to promote trade between the two countries as part of its broader initiative to strengthen regional economic cooperation.

Over the past few years China has been building ports and making strategic investments throughout South Asia as part of its “String of Pearls” plan, says Rebecca Cruise, Assistant Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma and a security studies and a comparative politics expert.

Rebecca Cruise reports on the Xi Jinping's tour of South Asia and its effects on the future of trade between China and those countries. She also outlines President Obama's strategy to help contain the Ebola outbreak devastating West Africa.

Later in the program, Suzette Grillot interviews groundbreaking social entrepreneur Paul Polak about his strategies for pulling people out of poverty around the world.

Rebecca Cruise provides an update on the kidnapping of hundreds of girls in Nigeria, and Joshua Landis discusses this week’s Syrian rebel departure from Homs.

Later, a conversation with longtime China scholar David Lampton. He argues the country’s leaders have to reconcile a fragmented bureaucracy with explosive economic growth and a rising middle class.

Alison Anzalone / U.S. Department of State Flickr Public Domain

After the power struggle to fill the power vacuum left by Mao Zedong’s death in 1976, right-wing reformers won control of the government and Deng Xiaoping helped China exceed the expectations and predictions of the international community.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

Vice President Joseph Biden shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe after their meeting in Tokyo, Japan, on Tuesday.
William Ng / U.S. Department of State

China says it is fully capable of enforcing its newly-declared maritime air defense zone above disputed islands in the East China Sea that has drawn strong denunciations from the U.S., Japan and other nations.

“They're [the islands] not all that impressive, but they happen to be on top of what looks like oil reserves or natural gas,” says Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies. “There are a lot of people in this part of the world that are needing energy, and the demand there rises, so this becomes about resources, and about power.”

China hosted back-to-back visits this week with Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. More and more detainees are participating in a hunger strike at the detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

So far more than 1,000 have died in the April 24 collapse of Rana Plaza in Dhaka. ABC Radio Sima Bhowmik joins Suzette Grillot for a conversation about the lack of government oversight in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Dainis Matisons / Flickr

Earlier this week Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu traveled to China. Even though the two leaders did not meet, the timing of the visits signals China could start to become a diplomatic player in the troubled region.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma and a longtime observer of Syria, says China tried to arrange a meeting in 2007 between Netanyahu and Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, but it didn’t work.

“[China has] been asserting themselves more and more in the Middle East,” Landis says. “And that’s a product of the United States withdrawing, and China is becoming much more self-confident.”