KGOU
A sign advertises recreational and medical marijuana outside a dispensary in Colorado.
David Anderson / David Anderson

Proposed Rules Show How Oklahoma Might Regulate Medical Marijuana If Voters Approve State Question

Pregnant women, people on probation and those recently convicted of a felony would be barred from obtaining a medical marijuana license if voters on Tuesday approve State Question 788, under proposed rules under consideration at the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

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Robin Wertz, of Exodus House in Oklahoma City, which helps people released from prison gain a footing as they re-enter society, has been out of prison for 11 years. But she still in prohibited from voting, and won't be able to cast a ballot until 2024.
Ilea Shutler / Oklahoma Watch

For Robin Wertz, the wait will be long before she can cast a ballot at an Oklahoma polling place.

Wertz, who runs a nonprofit center in Oklahoma City that helps people transition from prison back into society, is prohibited from voting in any election until 2024. That’s in spite of the fact that she has been out of prison for 11 years, works full-time, has never re-offended and can travel abroad with no restrictions.

“I’ve never even received a traffic ticket,” Wertz said of her time since leaving prison. “It’s like I’m still being punished.”

Erik Hersman/Flickr

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined once again by political scientist Keith Gaddie.

The three discuss the surge in voter registration ahead of the June 26 primary election, how State Question 788 could affect turnout and the three-way tie in the race for Oklahoma’s governorship.

Wikimedia Commons

On Wednesday a U.S. Supreme Court decision reversed a 1992 precedent that said businesses were only required to pay sales tax if they had a physical presence in the state. It was welcome news for Oklahoma, which has been trying for years to force online companies to pay sales tax., which made up 31 percent of state revenue in 2017.

 

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

In a landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that police must obtain a search warrant to access an individual's cellphone location information. The 5-4 decision imposes new limits on law enforcement's ability to get at the increasing amount of data that private companies amass in the modern technological age.

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Following the 2014-16 oil bust, Oklahoma’s oil production reached new heights. But gains in employment haven’t kept pace. The state’s oil and gas industry employs 20 percent fewer people than it did at the height of production last year, according to a new analysis by the Kansas City Federal Reserve.

A sign marks the entrance to a coal ash reclamation pit near Bokoshe in southeastern Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma is the first state in the nation to receive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s approval to manage its own coal ash disposal program. State and federal officials and utility companies said Oklahoma’s plan would improve oversight, but environmental groups like Earthjustice and the Sierra Club said the move protects industry and endangers public health.

Some online sales are about to start costing more.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that states can require retailers to collect and remit sales taxes on out-of-state purchases. The 5-to-4 decision reversed decades-old decisions that protected out-of-state vendors from sales tax obligations unless the vendor had a physical presence in the state.

USDA/Lance Cheung

The Chinese government plans to implement retaliatory tariffs on $50 billion worth of American goods next month. Although beef is on the list, Oklahoma cattlemen are also keeping an eye on pork tariffs.

 

 

China is an up and coming market for Oklahoma’s cattle ranchers. American producers just regained access to China as an export market when a 14-year ban on U.S. beef exports to the country was lifted last year.

SandRidge Energy held its annual shareholder meeting at 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

SandRidge shareholders elected four of Carl Icahn’s nominees to the company’s seven-member board of directors Tuesday, giving the activist investor a slim majority on the board. The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo writes the company will likely be sold, but it is not clear if Icahn will first break SandRidge up into pieces.

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