Oklahoma state Capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

State Has $140.8M For Agencies, Fallin Considers Special Session For Teacher Pay Raise

Oklahoma midyear state budget cuts were deeper than necessary, and now the state has $140.8 million that it can allocate to agencies. Gov. Mary Fallin is considering calling a special session of the legislature to use those funds to give teachers a pay raise. The Office of Management and Enterprise Services released its final General Revenue Fund collection numbers for Fiscal Year 2016 on Wednesday. The midyear revenue failures resulted in cuts of $412 million, or seven percent. The state’s...
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A power plant
Wladimir Labeikovsky / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

No matter where you land on the climate change discussion, humans have become a geophysical force that impacts everything from local ecosystems to the atmosphere itself.

“Humans are having, for a single species, pretty much unprecedented effect on their entire biosphere, such that it could possibly be recorded permanently in the geological record,” University of Oklahoma anthropologist Noah Theriault argues. “If an extraterrestrial species came down and studied our planet sometime in the distant future, they would be able to tell there was some big change right around what we would consider to be the geological present.”

But what do you call that?

A man walks by Pickleman’s Gourmet Cafe in Norman. A woman is suing the restaurant after an altercation with a University of Oklahoma football player there two years ago.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Two years after the altercation between Amelia Molitor and University of Oklahoma football player Joe Mixon, Molitor is suing the restaurant where it happened in federal court.

The lawsuit alleges the Campus Corner establishment didn't have a door man or a security guard the night Molitor was punched in the face, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., attends an organizational meeting of the House Rules Committee, January 7, 2015.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Democrats bolstered their case Wednesday night that Hillary Clinton is ready to be commander in chief, and seized on Republican nominee Donald Trump’s comments that seemed to encourage Russia to use cyber-espionage against Clinton.

“It is inconceivable to me that any presidential candidate would be that irresponsible,” former CIA director Leon Panetta said Wednesday night.

Oklahoma state Capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Oklahoma midyear state budget cuts were deeper than necessary, and now the state has $140.8 million that it can allocate to agencies. Gov. Mary Fallin is considering calling a special session of the legislature to use those funds to give teachers a pay raise.

Yes on 792 chairman Jeff Reasor speaks at a press conference on July 27, 2016. Reasor is the chairman and CEO of Tahlequah-based grocery store chain Reasor’s.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Supporters of a state question that would change Oklahoma’s alcohol laws launched their campaign today Wednesday. The group Yes On 792 is advocating on behalf of a ballot question that would allow convenience stores to sell full strength beer and wine. Liquor stores would be able to sell cold beer.

Greater Oklahoma City Chamber president Roy Williams says alcohol reform would help the state attract and retain young talent.

Oklahoma City University professor Kyle Dean presents findings of an economic impact report during the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association conference Tuesday in Tulsa.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Casinos in rural Oklahoma bring in about half of all gaming revenue, and the small towns these establishments call home reap some of the rewards.

A report presented at the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association conference Tuesday revealed that small, rural towns get an economic boost when a tribal casino opens, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

An active aggregate mining operation near Mill Creek, Okla.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s four primary environmental agencies have lost more than $15 million in state appropriations and tens of millions of dollars in legislatively directed reductions to revolving funds, OETA reports.

Oklahoma delegate Cedric Johnson smiles as he watches during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016.
Matt Rourke / AP

Twenty of Oklahoma’s 42 delegates went to the eventual nominee Hillary Clinton during Tuesday’s roll call vote at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. The rest went to U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who won Oklahoma’s presidential primary in February.

Delegate Isabel Baker cast the votes for Clinton. The mother of Cherokee Nation principal chief Bill John Baker was born in 1929, just nine years after the 19th Amendment guaranteed women the right to vote.

“I never thought that I would live to see this day,” Baker said.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. wave to supporters during a rally in Portsmouth, N.H., Tuesday, July 12, 2016, where Sanders endorsed Clinton for president.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Democrats officially nominated Hillary Clinton as their presidential candidate Tuesday night in Philadelphia, but Clinton’s primary victory has been a tough pill to swallow for some supporters of her rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

A customer picks up her prescription at the pharmacy counter inside Walgreens at 1400 E. Second St. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In the first six months of 2016, a database helped block 20,000 sales of pseudoephedrine in Oklahoma.

The popular cold medicine is a key ingredient in the manufacture of methamphetamine, and pharmacy counter sales are blocked if the buyer shows up on a national database. The National Precursor Log Exchange, or NPLEx, includes names of people with methamphetamine-related convictions and buying histories, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

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