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Wine bottles in The Spirit Shop in Norman
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

State Question Could Bring Wine And Cold Beer To More Places, Change Oklahoma’s Alcohol Distribution

“There he is!” Bryan Kerr said with a laugh, as he greeted a customer at his liquor store in Moore. ”You’re always showing up at exactly the right time.” The customer navigated through rows of bottles at Moore Liquor, while Kerr slipped outside. He took a few steps to an adjoining storefront to another business he owns: Party Moore. “A lot of people mistake it for like a Party Galaxy or Party City. It is not that,” Kerr said as he cracked open the store’s door. “It is a party store that is...
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Protesters marched from the Greenwood Cultural Center to Tulsa City Hall in a demonstration over Terence Crutcher's death.
Matt Trotter / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Protesters demanding justice for an unarmed black man shot by Tulsa police earlier this month marched to Tulsa's city hall Tuesday.

The demonstrators gathered at the site of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot, marking a day of justice called for last week by Crutcher's family, their attorneys and the Rev. Al Sharpton, who was on hand to lead the march. The national civil rights leader praised Tulsa police for releasing video of the shooting but said there are more steps to take.

Attorney John Hunsucker stands next to a breath testing machine.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

A court decision earlier this week might keep the state from revoking thousands of driver’s licenses.

Monday's ruling means the outcome of a breathalyzer test that leads to criminal charges can't be used to take away someone's driving privileges, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The U.S. government has agreed to pay a total of $492 million to 17 American Indian tribes for mismanaging natural resources and other tribal assets, according to an attorney who filed most of the suits.

Wine bottles in The Spirit Shop in Norman
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

“There he is!” Bryan Kerr said with a laugh, as he greeted a customer at his liquor store in Moore. ”You’re always showing up at exactly the right time.”

The customer navigated through rows of bottles at Moore Liquor, while Kerr slipped outside. He took a few steps to an adjoining storefront to another business he owns: Party Moore.

“A lot of people mistake it for like a Party Galaxy or Party City. It is not that,” Kerr said as he cracked open the store’s door. “It is a party store that is exclusively built for parties that have alcohol in them.”

Attorney Dan Smolen (center) announced Monday he's researching a potential lawsuit based on violations of Terence Crutcher's civil rights. Smolen is also questioning why no video is available from Officer Betty Shelby's car.
Matt Trotter / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The attorney for Terence Crutcher’s widow believes there should be more video of his death at the hands of a Tulsa police officer.

According to a TPD policy manual, officers are able to trigger dash cam video recording five different ways, including by pressing a button on a microphone worn on their duty belts or elsewhere. Attorney Dan Smolen wants to know why there’s no video from Officer Betty Shelby’s car when she was there two minutes before anyone else.

Former CEO of Chesapeake Energy, Aubrey McClendon was killed in an automobile accident March 2nd, a day after being indicted on corruption charges.
Scott Detrow / StateImpact Pennsylvania

One of Oklahoma City's most prominent energy executives was also a prolific philanthropist, and his death earlier this year left many charities with unpaid pledges.

Even though Aubrey McClendon owed thousands of dollars at the time of his fatal car crash in March, the charities aren't fighting it, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Two dancers practice in an empty lot next to their International Dance Studio (IDance) in Capitol Hill.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

43 states had a higher voter turnout than Oklahoma in the last presidential election in 2012. We wanted to know more about why the state’s voter turnout is so low.

With support from the Kirkpatrick Foundation, KGOU and KOSU are collaborating on a series called Oklahoma Engaged. In the first of several stories, we focus on the state’s changing electorate.

The hurdles Native American teenagers face in and out of school are daunting. College Horizons, a small organization based in New Mexico, has proven they're not insurmountable.

Every year, the group sponsors week-long retreats on college campuses for teenagers from some of the more than 500 federally-recognized tribes in the U.S.

One of those retreats was at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis., where 85 students gathered along with dozens of admissions officers from some of the nation's most selective universities.

Oklahoma City Skyline at night
StevenSmith1 / Flickr Creative Commons

While pop-culture references to Oklahoma frequently involve depictions of either tranquil farm folk or tornadic American sharpshooters, few Americans realize the distinctly international role of that the state has. Along with over 200,000 immigrants who call Oklahoma home, both Tulsa and Oklahoma host international delegations through an organization known as Global Ties.

Karen Holp, KGOU General Manager.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

September 25, 2016

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

Well, that is nearly the last time I’ll say “from the manager’s desk” because this is my last week of employment here at KGOU Radio.

But after that, I’ll say, “from the former manager’s desk” because I’m sticking around a bit as a volunteer -- to help with the membership drive, to announce the new manager when that happens, and to keep an eye on things until then. Old broadcaster are frankly hard to get rid of.

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