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Ronny Jackson Withdraws As VA Nominee

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's embattled nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, has withdrawn from consideration for the post amid allegations he had fostered a hostile work environment and behaved improperly while serving as the top doctor leading the White House medical unit. In a statement Thursday morning, Jackson said, "Going into this process, I expected tough questions about how to best care for our veterans, but I did not expect to have...

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Oklahoma Teachers Move Science Lessons Outside And Away From Textbooks

5 hours ago
Zoe Travers / StateImpact Oklahoma

The state’s market for engineering and technology jobs is growing, but the test scores of Oklahoma students lag behind national averages on science and math test scores. Researchers say one way to fix this gap is training science educators to do more than teach the facts — and to think beyond the textbook.

Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

One of the most iconic images of the teacher walkout and the cuts to education funding that drove the movement was of tattered, duct-taped, antiquated textbooks.

Traci Baker

Oklahoma’s Libertarian Party recently elected a 20-year-old Traci Baker to be the party’s state secretary. Baker, who studies at University of Oklahoma, is the first transgender political party executive in the nation, and her decision to register as Libertarian coincided with coming out as transgender.

“I was about to come out as trans, and I thought now’s a good time to re-register as a libertarian and associate with a party that I might be able to find some level of success with,” Baker said.

Across the country, universities are being criticized over issues of money: from how they spend their endowments, to how they raise tuition, to how they award financial aid.
Michael Schiller / Reveal

It’s no secret that college is getting more expensive – or that America’s student debt has erupted into a full-on crisis. But it’s not just loans that are putting pressure on Americans seeking an education. As this week’s episode explains, students face a variety of obstacles, from rising tuition rates to hard-line immigration laws.

Reveal: Trumping Hate

6 hours ago
Mr. Fish for Reveal

There’s been a lot of conversation about whether Donald Trump has inspired a new wave of hate in America.

Reveal reporter Will Carless set out to understand the president’s role in hundreds of hate incidents across the country, with help from the Documenting Hate project led by ProPublica. He found a striking pattern that extended across races, religions and sexual orientation.

We also check in with Reveal reporter Aaron Sankin about what’s going on inside the government agency that’s supposed to be fighting discrimination, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Legislature gave final approval on four criminal justice reform bills and sent them to the governor Tuesday. Here’s a breakdown of the measures and what they’re designed to do:

Robert MacDonald via AP

State climatologist Gary McManus says this year will be the latest start to the state’s tornado season on record.

“We’re going to be into May, at least, before we get our first tornado,” McManus said. He noted, since the National Weather Service began keeping records in 1950, the latest recorded start to Oklahoma’s tornado season was April 26, 1962.

By this time of year, Oklahoma has usually recorded 16-17 tornadoes. Drought and cool weather are two factors contributing to the late start in 2018.

Workers at a site of a pipeline under construction along state Highway 75 north of Horntown.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Today on the Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo talks discusses conservation credit programs that are designed to protect the American burying beetle. She also talks about the Choctaw Nation’s recycling efforts.

John Minchillo / AP Images

For the first time since they officially declared for the race, six of the 10 candidates vying for the GOP’s gubernatorial nomination came together Monday for a forum hosted by The Oklahoman.

The six tackled issues ranging from abortion rights to wind taxes as they tried to convince prospective voters watching in person at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art or at home watching the live feed why they should receive their support.

Here are some of the takeaways from the debate:

Tax Increases

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that foreign corporations cannot be sued for damages in U.S. courts for aiding in terrorist attacks or other human rights violations. The vote was 5-to-4.

Writing for the conservative majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy said the"courts are not well suited to make the required policy judgments implicated by corporate liability in cases like this one."

Rather, the political branches — Congress and the executive — should deal with these issues, he said.

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