Trump's Attempt To Refocus Campaign Gets Obscured By One Blinding Final Debate Moment

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.And he needed to break through the lid that has settled atop his sizable base of strong supporters, containing that bloc at...
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Lt. Gen. Lee K. Levy II speaks at the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber’s State of Aerospace luncheon Tuesday at the Embassy Suites Oklahoma City Downtown/Medical Center.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Earlier this week the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber held its annual State of Aerospace luncheon to update the business community on both the military and civilian sides of the industry.

Tinker Air Force Base wants to work with small businesses, but the Journal Record’s senior reporter and digital strategist Sarah Terry-Cobo says the federal government’s seven-year budget impasse means defense contractors suffer from a pay delay.

People gather for the Fiesta de las Americas in Oklahoma City on Oct. 1, 2016.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged


Pete White drives slowly through his old neighborhood in south Oklahoma City. The 78-year-old Oklahoma City councilman has lived in the area his entire life.


“This is the house I grew up in right here,” White said as he drove through a tree lined neighborhood of modest homes.


Goats on a farm near Covington, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

State Question 777 would create a constitutional right to farm and ranch in Oklahoma, giving the agriculture industry unique protection from the state legislature. The ballot question concerns livestock and crops, but legal experts say the statewide measure will likely come down to lawsuits and courts.

In the weeks leading up to the November election, officials in cities and towns across the state have urged Oklahomans to vote no on SQ 777.

Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh speaks to members on the House Criminal Justice and Corrections Committee on October 19, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections says one of its biggest challenges is recruiting and retaining employees.

During an interim study Wednesday, Prison Director Joe Allbaugh told lawmakers turnover for the agency is roughly 28 percent. Correctional officers in particular, Allbaugh said, are even harder to retain. Turnover for those positions is approaching 40 percent.

He blamed the high-stress nature of the job combined with low-pay and long hours and said many cadets have a false idea of what being a prison officer entails.  

Road construction continues on NW 164th Street between May and Portland avenues in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City is preparing for midyear budget cuts because of low sales tax revenue.

Mayor Mick Cornett and city councilmembers had been hoping for growth in the sales tax, but revenue to the city is down 4 percent.

Weak consumer spending means the city will have to cut back on its own spending by about $10 million halfway through the fiscal year.


U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., says he doesn't agree with GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump's accusations that the upcoming election is "rigged."

Cole said he's been involved in elections his whole life, including the 2000 contest between then-Gov. George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore. Cole served as the Chief of Staff to the Republican National Committee.

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel gestures as he answers a question at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 30, 2008.

The state auditor’s office released findings Tuesday from an investigation into the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office. The findings say the sheriff’s office unlawfully spent department funds under John Whetsel’s leadership.

According to the review, the department failed to pay healthcare contracts even though money was available at the time. Auditors also determined Whetsel purchased nearly $1 million worth of vehicles while other obligations weren’t met.

Carla Quillen, a proponent of SQ 780/781 stands outside her office on Aug. 30, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s prisons are crowded, and the state continues to incarcerate offenders at the second- highest rate in the nation, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Two state questions on the November 8 ballot aim to ease both of those strains.  

emerald ash borer
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Scientists have found an invasive, tree-eating beetle in far northeastern Oklahoma, and the ash trees headed to a Spavinaw lumber yard are at risk from the pesky insect.

Johnson Lumber Co. owner Darren Johnson told The Journal Record’s Brian Brus he hasn’t seen any damage yet, but he’s still hoping for a hard winter to slow down the emerald ash borer beetle.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren (left) speaks as Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby looks on during a news conference after The Big 12 Conference meeting in Grapevine, Texas, Monday, Oct. 17, 2016.
LM Otero / AP

After months of speculation and discussion, the Big 12 Conference decided against expansion. The announcement came after Monday’s six-hour meeting with the conference's university presidents and the commissioner.

University of Oklahoma president David Boren is the chairman of the conference's board of directors, and he said the decision was unanimous.