Co-Founder Of Oklahoma AIM
4:38 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

American Indian Movement Activist Carter Camp Dies

Credit Neeta Lind / Flickr.com

Carter Camp, a longtime activist with the American Indian Movement who was a leader in the Wounded Knee occupation in South Dakota, has died in Oklahoma. He was 72.

Camp's sister, Casey Camp-Horinek, said Thursday he died Dec. 27 surrounded by family in White Eagle, Okla. Camp-Horinek says her brother had been suffering from cancer for the past year.

Camp, a member of the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, was a leader in in the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee. The 71-day siege included several gunbattles with federal officers

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StateImpact Oklahoma
2:29 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

‘Widespread Destruction And Panic’ Anticipated After Major Earthquake In Oklahoma

Credit StevenSmith1 / Flickr Creative Commons

An earthquake “swarm” has been rattling Oklahoma since 2009. Most of the shaking has been small, but the phenomenon has left many Oklahomans feeling uneasy.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:17 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

From Guymon To Poteau And Beyond: The Biggest StateImpact Stories Of 2013

Logan Layden talks with Kiowa historian 'Joe Fish' DuPoint about the potential impact of limestone mining on Longhorn Mountain in August 2013.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The StateImpact team traveled about 10,000 miles in 2013 to interview Oklahomans about how government policy affects their lives.

Our reporting took us to all corners of Oklahoma, across the border into Texas, and to the nation’s capital and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Listen to the Radio Story

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12:54 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

The Eight Best Things Oklahoma Towns Did In 2013

Lead in text: 
The University of Oklahoma's Institute for Quality Communities reviewed some of the best things that happened in Oklahoma’s towns in 2013, from big time music festivals to smartphone apps (H/t to "World Views" contributor Rebecca Cruise).
The Atlantic Cities recently shared 2013 highlights from cities around the country.
World Views
12:07 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Looking Ahead: Why 2014 Will Be A Huge Year For Afghanistan

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry greets Afghan President Hamid Karzai before a trilateral meeting with Pakistani Chief of Army Staff General Ashfaq Kayani in Brussels, Belgium on April 24, 2013.
Credit U.S. Department of State / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Andrew Wilder, Director of Afghanistan and Pakistan Programs at the United States Institute of Peace.

In April, voters in Afghanistan head to the polls to elect a successor to the term-limited President Hamid Karzai. The controversial-at-times leader is the only democratically-elected head of state the troubled country has known since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001.

Andrew Wilder, the Director of Afghanistan and Pakistan Programs at the United States Institute of Peace and a close observer of Afghanistan for nearly 30 years, says it’s very important April’s elections are credible, and produce a legitimate outcome.

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OU Football
8:55 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Oklahoma Expects Best From 'Bama In Sugar Bowl

Credit Sooner Sports / soonersports.com

Whatever Bob Stoops may have said about the overall strength of the Southeastern Conference, that apparently doesn't apply when it comes to the challenge he sees before 11th-ranked Oklahoma in the Sugar Bowl.

The Sooners' coach made that clear on the eve of Thursday night's matchup with No. 3 Alabama.

Stoops says Alabama, in his eyes, is "still the best team in the country."

Last spring, Stoops challenged the notion that the SEC — home of the last seven national champions — is the strongest league in the nation.

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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Accident Or Not? Palestinian Diplomat's Death Is A Mystery

The scene outside the residence of Palestinian diplomat Jamal al-Jamal in Prague. An explosion there Wednesday killed the 56-year-old ambassador.
Filip Singer EPA/LANDOV

Was the Palestinian ambassador to the Czech Republic killed by accident or are the circumstances of his death on Wednesday more nefarious?

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The Salt
8:37 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Mass-Produced Meat Turned Phosphorus Into Pollution

A dead carp floats in water near the shore at Big Creek State Park on Sept. 10 in Polk City, Iowa. Like many agricultural states, Iowa is working with the EPA to enforce clean-water regulations amid degradation from manure spills and farm-field runoff.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 9:27 am

It's a quandary of food production: The same drive for efficiency that lowers the cost of eating also can damage our soil and water.

Take the case of one simple, essential chemical element: phosphorus.

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Economic Forecast
8:19 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Oklahoma, Midwest Economic Outlook Optimistic

Credit Steve Wampler / Flickr.com

A monthly economic report suggests supply managers surveyed in nine Midwestern and Plains states are optimistic about the regional economy over the next six months.

The confidence index for the Mid-America Business Conditions Index jumped to 66.5 last month from 57.2 in November. However, the overall index rose just 2 points, to 53.2 from 51.2 in November.

Creighton University economist Ernie Goss oversees the survey, and he says businesses tied to agriculture continue to report softer economic conditions.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Thu January 2, 2014

VIDEO: Stranded Passengers Flown To Safety In Antarctic

Help arrives: an image from video taken as a helicopter landed Thursday on an ice floe in the Antarctic. The copter then carried passengers from a stranded ship to another vessel waiting nearby in open waters.
Intrepid Science

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 7:51 am

After more than a week aboard a ship stuck in ice off Antarctica, 52 scientists and paying passengers from the Russian ship MV Akademik Shokalskiy are either aboard or headed to an Australian icebreaker that will now take them to warmer waters.

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