Homelessness
8:24 am
Tue August 6, 2013

"Street Paper" Makes OKC Debut

Credit Curbside Chronicle

Students from Vanderbilt University and the University of Oklahoma have launched a newspaper written and sold by homeless or low-income individuals.

The Curbside Chronicle is a bi-monthly general interest publication. It includes stories written by homeless people and other reporters about urban issues.

Called a "street paper," The Curbside Chronicle seeks to offer employment to homeless and low-income individuals and give them a voice. It also hopes to cut down on panhandling.

Read more
Affordable Care Act
6:42 am
Tue August 6, 2013

State Leaders, Workers Enjoy Ample Health Benefits

Credit ana branca / Flickr Creative Commons

When Gov. Mary Fallin and Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb go see their primary-care doctors, they pay $30 out of pocket. Their prescriptions cost $10 if they get generics, more if they get name-brand drugs.

Oklahoma taxpayers pick up the entire cost of their insurance premiums, which total $18,113 per year for each of their families.

In fact, the health allowance they receive from the state totals $19,717 a year. They can use the surplus to pay for other state benefits or roll it into their take-home pay.

Read more
Weather and Climate
6:00 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

May Tornado Death Toll Rises

May 20-21 2013 Storm Clouds Over Moore, Oklahoma
Credit Dawn Musick / Flickr.com

The Oklahoma Medical Examiner has increased the toll from the May 20 tornado at Moore after the death of a 90-year-old woman critically  injured in the storm.  Spokeswoman Amy Elliott said today that the death of Kathryn Begay pushed the  death toll to 25.  Begay's home in the town of Moore was destroyed and she suffered a fractured  skull. Officials say she suffered a pair of strokes after the storm and died  last Thursday.   A tornado that struck El Reno on May 31 killed 22 people, including 14 adults  and eight children. Many victims drowned due to heavy rain from that storm.   

Read more
Business and Economy
5:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Investigation Into Bribes Leads To Construction Corruption At Choctaw Casino

Choctaw Grand Tower Casino
Credit Brad Holt / Flickr.com

Six people have been indicted in federal court in Muskogee after two bribery investigations revealed alleged corruption involving construction of a casino for the Choctaw Nation in Durant.

Lauri Parsons and her husband, Brent Parsons, Cordell Bugg, James Stewart, and Mark Eshenroder were indicted on conspiracy to commit theft or bribery charges. Brent Parsons and Stewart also face money laundering charges.

Allen Franklin, project manager for the tribe, is accused of conspiracy to commit theft or bribery.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
3:03 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Republicans and Democrats Agree: Tornado Shelters Are Worth Subsidizing

Oklahoma U.S. Rep. Tom Cole
Credit Republicanconference / Flickr

A bit of rare bipartisanship in Washington could make individuals safer when tornadoes threaten.

Oklahoma U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, a Republican, and Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu, a Democrat, both introduced versions of the Tornado Family Safety Act on Aug. 2.

Read more
Animal Rights
11:41 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Future Of Horse Slaughter In State Remains Uncertain

A state law allowing horse slaughter goes into effect Nov. 1, but there appear to be no plans for a facility in Oklahoma.
Credit busse / Flickr (Creative Commons)

Although the Legislature passed a bill this year authorizing the slaughter of horses, it's not clear if a facility will open in Oklahoma once the law takes effect Nov. 1.

The bill was backed by Rep. Skye McNiel of Bristow and Sen. Eddie Fields of Wynona. Fields says he's not aware of any efforts to build a facility in Oklahoma.

Before the law passed, Ahsan Amil of Oklahoma Meat Company applied for a federal inspection with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Amil tells the Tulsa World that he's no longer pursuing the permit.

Read more
Tulsa
8:34 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Tulsa's Brady Street Could Get New Name

The newly opened Woody Guthrie Center is one of several new cultural venues along Brady St. in downtown Tulsa.
Credit Kurt Gwartney / KGOU

A Tulsa city councilor says he'll have the votes needed to rename a popular downtown street that is linked to a town father involved with the Ku Klux Klan and possibly a 1921 race riot.

The vote to rename Brady Street is Thursday.

Councilman Jack Henderson says the change is needed to send a message that hate and racism won't be tolerated in Tulsa.

The street is named after prominent Tulsa figure Wyatt Tate Brady, who was in the Klan and could have possibly had a role in the 1921 race riot, when some 300 blacks were killed in the city.

Read more
FJJMA
8:06 am
Mon August 5, 2013

White In As OU Art Museum Interim Director

Patrons viewing works at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art during James T. Bialac Community Day 2012.
Credit Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

The chief curator at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art in Norman will serve as the facility's interim director.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren named Mark A. White to the position, though the appointment needs approval by the OU Board of Regents.

The Norman Transcript reports that White would start as interim director on Sept. 3. A national search will be conducted to replace former directorGhislain d'Humières, who resigned to become director of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Ky.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:21 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Terror Threat Shakes Up NSA Debate, Unites Some Lawmakers

A checkpoint leading to the closed U.S. Embassy compound in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, on Saturday.
Mohammed Huwais AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:17 am

The Obama administration's weekend decision to close diplomatic posts from Central Asia through the Middle East and into North Africa has led to applause from "rattled lawmakers in both parties," The Washington Post writes.

Read more
Education
5:38 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Missed Summer Learning Spells Out Long-Term Struggles

A researcher at Johns Hopkins University says there are serious setbacks for children without summer educational opportunities, known as the "summer slide."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:52 pm

At first glance, Horizons looks like an ordinary summer getaway for kids: There are games, bonding time and lots of bagged snacks. But along with the songs and the pool, there are fractions to memorize and online grammar quizzes to take.

An affiliate of a national network, the program in Washington, D.C., is a six-week, free summer service for children from low-income families. Its purpose is simple: to make sure they don't fall behind in school by the time September rolls around.

Read more

Pages