Education
5:58 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Education Board Member Seeks Superintendent Role

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A member of the state Board of Education is resigning to pursue a potential statewide race for the job currently held by State Superintendent Janet Barresi.

Joy Hofmeister announced her resignation Wednesday and says she's thinking about running for the very position she oversaw as a board member.

Hofmeister says she is an advocate for implementation of meaningful reforms for Oklahoma's education system. Hofmeister says that has led her to strongly consider seeking the position of state superintendent.

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OneSix8
12:47 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Entertaining the Hours of Your Week: Celebrating Oklahoma

Credit Arts Council of Oklahoma City

With two festivals and a major marathon, the Oklahoma City metro stays busy this weekend. Here are some things you may not want to miss.

The Norman Music Festival takes over downtown Main Street Thursday through Saturday. Thousands of people and over 300 bands flood the stages to deliver a free, family-friendly event. Steven White, co-chairman of the festival, says this year’s headliners like The Joy Formidable and JD McPherson are doing “incredible” things across the country.

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World Views
11:58 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Women in War: Combat and Coverage When the Front Lines Blur

U.S. Army Spc. Rebecca Buck provides perimeter security outside an Iraqi police station in the Tarmiya Province of Iraq, March 30, 2008.
Technical Sergeant William Greer United States Air Force

Hear Rebecca Cruise's full interview with NPR's Rachel Martin

In January, former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta announced the end of the U.S. military’s 19-year-old ban on women officially serving in combat roles.

“Every time I visited the warzone, every time I've met with troops, reviewed military operations, and talked to wounded warriors, I've been impressed with the fact that everyone - men and women alike - everyone is committed to doing the job,” Panetta said. “They're fighting and they're dying together. And the time has come for our policies to recognize that reality.”

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin covered national security issues for NPR from 2010-2012. She told KGOU’s World Views the change in policy recognizes the reality on the ground, but also will afford women the opportunity to compete for top-level spots in very elite military units.

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Tax Cut Proposal
10:18 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Okla. GOP Leaders Agree on Tax Cuts for 2015

Gov. Mary Fallin, Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman (R-Sapulpa), and House Speaker T.W. Shannon (R-Lawton) announce their tax cut proposal in the Blue Room of the State Capitol - April 23, 2013
Credit Kurt Gwartney / KGOU

The Republican leaders at the State Capitol gathered in the Blue Room Tuesday to announce what they’re calling major agreements on several key proposals before lawmakers this session.

Gov. Mary Fallin, Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman (R-Sapulpa) and House Speaker T.W. Shannon (R-Lawton) each took turns describing the plan to cut state income taxes, change the workers’ compensation system and repair the State Capitol.

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Shots - Health News
9:55 am
Wed April 24, 2013

First Case Of New Bird Flu Found Outside China

People sit near pigeons at a park in Shanghai where more than 30 human cases of bird flu have been reported.
AP

Public health authorities in Taiwan have identified the first human case of a new type of bird flu seen outside China.

The development, while not unexpected, points to the potential spread of a new type of bird flu that has, according to the World Health Organization, sickened at least 108 people and been implicated in 22 deaths.

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8:30 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Inside the Arguments in Oklahoma’s Supreme Court Water Case

Lead in text: 
On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in Tarrant v. Herrmann, an Oklahoma-Texas water fight with national implications. The justices grappled with the 30-year-old Red River Compact, and whether a region of Texas can reach across state lines to access water in southeastern Oklahoma.
The two states have different interpretations of some language in the agreement. The compact gives Oklahoma and Texas “equal rights” to some of the water in southeastern Oklahoma. But “equal rights” means different things to each state.
The Salt
2:24 am
Wed April 24, 2013

How Coffee Influenced The Course Of History

An overseer sits in the shade while workers collect coffee beans on a Brazilian plantation, circa 1750.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 2:49 pm

Coffee is a powerful beverage. On a personal level, it helps keep us awake and active. On a much broader level, it has helped shape our history and continues to shape our culture.

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9:10 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Fallin, Oklahoma legislative leaders announce trifecta of agreements

Lead in text: 
"The income tax cut plan now calls for lowering the top income tax rate from 5.25 percent to 5 percent on Jan. 1, 2015. The rate would be cut to 4.85 percent on Jan. 1, 2016, if total revenue growth for the state is equal to or greater than the previous fiscal year."
Republican Governor Mary Fallin and GOP legislative leaders have agreed on proposals to reduce the state's top personal income tax rate, overhaul the workers' compensation system and develop a long-range plan for maintaining state buildings.
7:09 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Transcript of Arguments in Oklahoma’s Supreme Court Water Case

Lead in text: 
The Supreme Court of the United States heard testimony today in the case of the Tarrant Regional Water District v. Herrmann, In better terms... Texas vs. Oklahoma.
Attorneys representing Oklahoma and Texas argued Tarrant v. Herrmann at the U.S. Supreme Court. The case concerns water in the Red River, and experts say it's a regional water fight that could impact national water-sharing agreements. The Supreme Court has released a transcript of today's arguments. The above transcript is preliminary.
6:32 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Fees Attacked By Legislature, But Is It Smart To Cut Off Another Revenue Source?

Lead in text: 
House Speaker T.W. Shannon (R-Lawton) says the moratorium is necessary because Oklahoma has raised fees by more than $100 million since 2007. During the recession, it was the easiest way Oklahoma had to raise revenues to fill budget gaps. Increasing taxes in Oklahoma requires a three-fourths supermajority in both houses of the legislature, or a vote of the people.
It's already nearly impossible to raise taxes in Oklahoma. Now, the legislature is poised to ban raising fees for drivers' licenses, state parks and other state services, too. A bill placing a moratorium on fee increases through 2016 has passed both houses of the state legislature.

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