3 Dead, Suspect Held In Shootings At Colorado Planned Parenthood

Updated 2:30 a.m. ETA suspect is in custody in shootings at a Planned Parenthood in Colorado Springs, Colo., the city's mayor announced at a press conference Friday, and officers are actively checking the building for any additional suspects or devices."The situation has been resolved; there is no continuing peril to the citizens of Colorado Springs,' Mayor John Suthers said.Several media outlets reported that a Colorado Springs law enforcement official has identified the suspected gunman as...
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Syrian refguees arrive on the Mediterranean coast, Sept. 2015.
Freedom House / Flickr Public Domain Mark 1.0

Gov. Mary Fallin wants President Obama to stop accepting Syrian refugees into the United States after Friday’s terrorist attacks in Paris that killed 129 people and killed scores more.

W. Joseph Campbell is a professor in the School of Communication at American University
American University


The future began 20 years ago, according to a new book by W. Joseph Campbell. In 1995, Timothy McVeigh’s truck bomb killed 168 people in Oklahoma City and sparked a debate about security. The Dayton Peace Accords ended a brutal war in the former Yugoslavia. The O.J. Simpson trial captured the imagination of a nation. Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinski began their affair that led to the President’s impeachment. And 1995 was the year the internet went mainstream.

At a news conference in Turkey on Monday, President Obama defended his administration's strategy against ISIS, calling Friday's deadly terrorist attacks in Paris "outrageous." He said, however, the U.S. would not send additional ground troops into Syria to combat the Islamic State.

French authorities have zeroed in on two men they believe were responsible for planning and launching the terrorist attacks in Paris that left at least 129 people dead.

Citing two sources close to the investigation in Paris, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports that officials believe Salim Benghalem, a French national who joined ISIS several years ago, directed Abdelhamid Abaaoud, an ISIS deputy and a Belgian national, to orchestrate Friday's rampage. The two men are believed to be in Syria.

University of Oklahoma students gather on the South Oval Monday morning to offer their support for the victims of Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris, France.
Jim Johnson / KGOU

Oklahoma is no stranger to acts of terror that leave indelible scars on the community and forever shape the lives of its citizens, and state and federal leaders and grassroots organizers offered prayers and encouragement in the 48 hours after the coordinated attacks that left more than 100 dead in France.

Gov. Mary Fallin said in a brief statement on social media Friday evening her thoughts and prayers are with the people of France after the terrorist attacks in Paris.

Strong to severe storms are looking likely Monday night into early Tuesday morning. Damaging winds and hail are the primary concerns, but tornadoes are possible.
Norman Forecast Office / National Weather Service

Strong to severe storms are likely Monday evening and into early Tuesday morning, with damaging winds and half dollar-sized hail the primary concerns.

“Expect development to kick off between about 4 and 6 p.m. over the panhandles and move into western Oklahoma and western North Texas,” National Weather Service meteorologist Jonathan Kurtz said Monday morning during a video briefing. “They are expected to move at a decent speed eastward into central Oklahoma through midnight, and into the eastern half of Oklahoma through the early morning hours Tuesday.”

As protests sweep across the University of Missouri, Yale, and other colleges, University of Oklahoma president David Boren reflects on how the campus he leads reacted to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon incident eight months ago.

Updated 4:25 a.m. ET Monday:

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls tells French radio RTL that there have been more than 150 raids throughout the night in France. More are expected.

Sunday's post:

As France observed its first of three days of national mourning, police said they were looking for a suspect who they believe may have been involved in the coordinated attacks that left scores dead in Paris on Friday.

President Johnson signs the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967.
Frank Wolfe / Public Domain Wikimedia

November 15, 2015

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

Last week was the 48th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act. Then President Johnson signed Public Law 90-129 into law on November 7, 1967, creating the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

In the wake of Friday's coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris, the French people — and supporters around the world — have been grieving. More than 120 people died in explosions and gunfire when well-coordinated teams of assailants struck at least six sites across the city.