Tulsa County Sheriff's reserve deputy Robert Bates enters the Tulsa County Jail Tuesday.
Matt Trotter / KWGS Public Radio Tulsa

Oklahoma State Bureau Of Investigation Opens Probe Into Tulsa County Sheriff's Office

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation announced Monday morning it's opened an investigation into allegations of misconduct in the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office. The move comes nearly two months after the shooting of a restrained suspect by a volunteer deputy. Eric Harris died when Robert Bates shot him after reportedly confusing his service revolver with his stun gun. The OSBI said in a news release that was also posted on social media it formally opened the investigation Friday after it...
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Muhammad Buhari speaks at the international think tank Chatham House on February 26, 2015.
Anieduugo / Wikimedia Commons

In the mid-1980s, Muhammadu Buhari ruled Nigeria as an iron-fisted military dictator. But today, Buhari represents a transition toward democracy for the country as the first Nigerian to come to power through a democratic process.

The White House / Youtube

President Obama says the deadly flooding in Oklahoma and Texas is a reminder that it's never too early to prepare for natural disasters. But he says the nation is better prepared than ever for today's storms.

“Not only do we have better information, but we have new mechanisms to disseminate it,” Obama said after receiving his annual hurricane briefing during his first visit to NOAA’s National Hurricane Center in Miami. “We’re also focusing on making ourselves more resilient to the impacts of a changing climate.”

Barges are docked at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa.
Kirby Lee Davis / The Journal Record

It seems like there’s no corner of the state that stayed dry over the past month as heavy rainfall dumped nearly two dozen inches of water in some cities and towns.

The widespread devastation is affecting interstate commerce and transportation across Oklahoma. Storms damaged several locks along the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System between Oklahoma and its eastern neighbor.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The Democratic leader in the Oklahoma House is joining a growing chorus of state legislators asking Gov. Mary Fallin to call a special session to address county roads and bridges damaged or destroyed by heavy flooding. 

Rep. Scott Inman said Thursday he wants the Legislature to access as much as $175 million from the state's Rainy Day Fund to help county commissioners pay for extensive damage that resulted from record-breaking rainfall this month.

Ariel Bridget Stephenson

This weekend is packed with live music by several local and national acts. From jazz to blue grass to grunge pop, you can listen all weekend without going broke, with cover charges ranging from free to $10.

"Mr. Cool Guy" from The Daddyo's Smother Your Brother

Oil-field workers use sledgehammers to unstick a pipe at the George saltwater disposal well near Wakita in northwestern Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Two burly men armed with sledgehammers take turns bashing a khaki-colored steel flange fastened to a pipe in the middle of a soggy, gravely lot near Wakita in northwestern Oklahoma.

Aerial footage of floodwaters covering Alameda Street as it crosses Lake Thunderbird in far east Norman on May 24, 2015.
Lawrence McEwen / YouTube

Gov. Mary Fallin has directed the Oklahoma Department of Transportation to speed up bidding on county infrastructure projects and find more ways to support recovery efforts in light of widespread damage after flooding throughout the month of May.

Fallin says some state lawmakers have asked her to redirect money from Oklahoma's Rainy Day Fund to county infrastructure projects, which she doesn't have the legal authority to do.

Gov. Mary Fallin and state emergency management director Albert Ashwood tour damaged areas in Purcell Wednesday morning.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Updated 3:17 p.m.: Severe storms likely across western Oklahoma

The National Weather Service has issued a Tornado Watch for counties in far western Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle, saying there's an Enhanced Risk for severe storms across far western Oklahoma Wednesday afternoon and evening.

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin and Oklahoma Emergency Management director Albert Ashwood meet with first responders in Purcell on May 27, 2015.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Clean-up continues across Texas and Oklahoma after days of heavy rain and flooding. In Oklahoma, May is already the wettest month on record and the rains aren’t done yet. More water means more flooding in a state where the soil is already saturated and rivers are overflowing.

Justin Nimmo walks up the muddy front steps of his rent-to-own store in Purcell, Oklahoma, a little town about 40 miles south of Oklahoma City. Inside, fans and dehumidifiers purr as they strain to dry out his showroom.

Mason Bolay climbs into the cab of a tractor on his family's farm near Perry, Okla.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Waters of the United States Rule — also known as the Clean Water Rule — attempts to clarify which bodies of water qualify for federal protection — which ones are streams, which ones are tributaries, whether pollution dumped into one stream will trickle into another — that sort of thing.

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