KGOU
Workers construct new homes at 12th Avenue NW and Tecumseh Road in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Home Construction Slows Despite Site Boom; Why Rentals Near Military Bases Make Good Investments

National figures out this week from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development showed sales of new single-family homes rose more than 12 percent between June and July. The seasonally adjusted annual rate of 654,000 units is the highest since October 2007 - right around the time the housing bubble burst. But home construction is showing in the U.S., according to the National Association of Home Builders. NAHB economist Robert Dietz said home construction is...
Read More

This story contains sensitive sexual information and may not be suitable for all readers.

Juan Guerrero was scared to get out of prison.

He was serving a six-and-a-half-year sentence in Lawton, Oklahoma, for having sex with an underage teenager.

Now, one of about 800,000 registered sex offenders in the United States, Guerrero faces the challenge of assimilating back into society. He was in his mid-30s and asking some pretty daunting questions: Where would he live? Who would hire him? How would he explain his past to people?

United States' Alexander Naddour performs on the pommel horse during the artistic gymnastics men's apparatus final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016.
Julio Cortez / AP

Former University of Oklahoma gymnast Alex Naddour earned the bronze medal in the men’s individual pommel horse final Sunday afternoon during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

It's the first medal in the event for the United States since Tim Daggett also took bronze in 1984.

The statue known as "Jesus Wept" near the Oklahoma City National Memorial.
David J. Phillip / AP

Religious leaders held a unity walk and a prayer service Monday’s evening in Oklahoma City as an alternative to a black mass scheduled at the Civic Center Music Hall.

Updated August 16, 9:48 a.m.

Color-coded ballots for each Oklahoma County district are pictured at the Oklahoma County Board of Elections in Oklahoma City, Thursday, June 23, 2016. The ballots are color-coded according to party.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahomans may not be able to vote for two presidential candidates this fall, including one high-profile third-party hopeful.

Green Party nominee Jill Stein and independent candidate Rocky de la Fuente are taking legal action to try to get on the ballot in November by arguing Oklahoma’s ballot access laws are too strict, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The lawsuit is joined by several voters who support the candidates.

health insurance cards and dollar bills
Lindsey Whelchel / Oklahoma Watch

A state panel recommended across-the-board rate increases Thursday for state employees' health insurance next year. The increases range from 6 percent to almost 16 percent, depending on the plan that someone chooses.

That’s the biggest bump since at least 2010, but officials told The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt it’s necessary to cover rising healthcare costs:

Teachers In Oklahoma Expected To Spend Hundreds On Classroom Supplies

Aug 14, 2016
Tulsa high school history teacher Vince Facione expected to spend at least $300 before the first day of school. He gives each of his 190 students a three-ring binder.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

Elementary music teacher Tony Flores’ entire classroom budget for the year will be expended on music for three performances. Last year, he bought new instruments, to the tune of $1,000 out of his own bank account.

In Danielle Childers’ pre-kindergarten classroom, students will have snacks for snack time, mats for naptime and stickers for a job well done, but the cost of those items falls on her.

August 14, 2016

This is from the Manager’s Desk.

This Saturday, August 20, is National Radio Day and KGOU is holding an open house from noon to 3 p.m. here in our studios.

We invite you to come for a little or stay for a while. We’ll have some meeting time with our news reporters so you can ask them about their work. 

A disposal well in northwestern Oklahoma operated by Newfield Exploration Mid-Continent.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma is still experiencing an unusually large amount of shaking, but the rate of earthquakes recorded in 2016 is down from last year.

The slowdown is likely due to reductions in the amount of waste-fluid the oil industry is pumping into disposal wells, which are thought to be causing most of the shaking.

Choctaw Nation Chief Gary Batton, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby at a news conference announcing the water deal.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

After five years of court proceedings and confidential negotiations, the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations have reached an agreement with the state over control of water in southeast Oklahoma.

Russia's Yulia Efimova, left, looks on as United States' Lilly King celebrates after winning the gold medal in the women's 200-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
Michael Sohn / AP

Beyond the athletic competition, feats of strength, and patriotic triumph, the Olympics serve as a moment where countries can come together and put their differences aside. But politics has played out during the first week of competition.

Pages