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Two dancers practice in an empty lot next to their International Dance Studio (IDance) in Capitol Hill.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

Oklahoma Engaged: Why Is Oklahoma's Voter Turnout So Low?

43 states had a higher voter turnout than Oklahoma in the last presidential election in 2012. We wanted to know more about why the state’s voter turnout is so low. With support from the Kirkpatrick Foundation, KGOU and KOSU are collaborating on a series called Oklahoma Engaged. In the first of several stories, we focus on the state’s changing electorate. We heard a statistic recently that caused us to take notice: 42% of Oklahomans under the age of 24 are minorities, but 75% of the people...
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Swaths of cannabis in northern Morocco. The U.N. estimates 80,000 families in the rugged northern Rif mountains make their living from growing marijuana. Their efforst have made Morocco the main hashish supplier for Europe and the world.
Abdeljalil Bounhar / AP

Since 2013, European Union officials have seized hundreds of tons of hashish, worth more than $3 billion, from 20 ships traversing a lucrative drug trafficking route across the Mediterranean.

The drugs flow through multiple countries – Morocco, Libya, Egypt, and some Balkan states – and even areas controlled by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, who are taxing the shipments as it goes through their territory.

Maria Armoudian
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Maria Armoudian’s first book explored the role radio played in exploiting deeply-held divisions between Hutus and Tutsis during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

The abandoned Lantana Apartments complex at 7408 NW 10th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The big news that came out of this week’s Oklahoma City Council meeting involved the body formally voicing its opposition to State Question 777 – the so-called “right-to-farm” proposal.

The Dallas Morning News' SportsDay reporter Chuck Carlton analyzes University of Oklahoma president David Boren's comments Wednesday about the possibility of expanding the athletic conference.

Floaters navigate their homemade raft down the Arkansas River in Tulsa, Okla., during the annual Great Raft Race on Labor Day 2016.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The section of the Arkansas River that runs through Tulsa is changing. For much of the city’s history, business owners constructed buildings facing away from what has been considered a polluted eyesore. But now Tulsa is embracing its most prominent physical feature.

Randy Harris is superintendent of Wagoner Public Schools.
Provided / Oklahoma Weekly Group

More than 100 school districts in Oklahoma are thinking about implementing a four-day school week, and that’s putting pressure on working parents. It’s also forcing employers to adjust.

In the eastern Oklahoma town of Wagoner, several major employers haven’t complained about absent parents. Daycare centers are also expanding to make room for more children, even though childcare availability in the state has shrunk significantly since 2008.

Oklahoma City Council member Pete White, left, and council attorney Kenneth Jordan in a council meeting at City Hall.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Oklahoma City Council passed a resolution Tuesday formally opposing State Question 777, which is commonly known as the “right-to-farm” amendment. The proposal would add a new section to state law guaranteeing farmers and ranchers can operate without interference unless the state has a compelling reason to get involved.

Rachel Jenkins, 32, was denied further treatment after a doctor hired by her company said she had a shoulder condition caused by aging, not her work accident. "What's age got to do with anything?" she asked.
Nick Oxford / ProPublica

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled Tuesday companies cannot opt-out of the 2013 workers’ compensation law.

The court’s 7-2 decision says the opt-out act’s provision “creates impermissible, unequal, disparate treatment of a select group of workers,” and is unconstitutional. The ruling comes two years and two days after Dillard’s employee Jonnie Vasquez was injured while working at a Dillard’s. 

Anthony McDermid, architect with TAP Architecture, stands in the parking lot of a Wal-Mart Supercenter at 1801 Belle Isle Blvd. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma lawmakers are hearing arguments Tuesday between architects and building designers.

State law exempts many commercial and residential buildings from needing an architect, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Charles Lord, senior hydrologist with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, explains the modified and expanded emergency orders issued Sept. 12 to oil companies in response to  the 5.8-magnitude earthquake over the Labor Day weekend.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Federal and state regulators on Monday expanded and modified emergency orders limiting oil and gas activity at wells near a fault line that produced Oklahoma’s strongest earthquake on record.

Regulators are targeting 67 disposal wells in two counties near the damaging 5.8-magnitude earthquake that rocked the state over the Labor Day weekend.

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