The Two-Way
4:53 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

2 Dead Indian Fishermen, 2 Accused Italian Marines, A Diplomatic Row

Italian marines Massimilian Latorre (left) and Salvatore Girone, who are at the center of a diplomatic row between India and Italy, return to Rome on Feb. 23. The two men have been charged in India with killing two fishermen, whom they mistook for pirates. India is demanding their return.
Angelo Carconi AP

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 5:48 pm

There's a diplomatic spat brewing between India and Italy over the trial of two Italian marines charged with killing two Indian fishermen last year.

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Planet Money
4:35 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Colleges Offering Bigger Merit Scholarships Is A Problem (If You Don't Get One).

Kenyon College is a liberal arts college in central Ohio.
Kenyon College

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 9:37 am

A bunch of private colleges have been in a financial aid arms race for years now, offering bigger and bigger merit scholarships to lure the best students.

This is nice for the students who get big merit scholarships. But it's not so nice for everybody else. Colleges have to come up with the money for those merit scholarships somehow — and they've done it in part, by jacking up tuition. (We did a story on this last year.)

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Shots - Health News
4:20 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Binge Drinking Sticks Wisconsin With A Hefty Tab

A bartender pours a beer at the Nomad Pub in Milwaukee, Wisc., in 2006.
Darren Hauck Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:47 am

Wisconsin has the highest number of binge drinkers in the nation — one in four adults. And binge drinking — defined as five or more alcoholic drinks in a short period of time for men, and four for women — cost the state $6.8 billion in 2012.

That breaks down to about $1,200 per person in higher taxes, more health care, and other costs, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

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Middle East
4:20 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Courts Become A Battleground For Secularists, Islamists In Syria

An Islamist rebel group in Aleppo called "the Authority for the Promotion of Virtue and Supporting the Oppressed" reviews applications for aid on Feb. 25. In addition to handing out aid, the Islamist group says it is carrying out civilian administration in parts of Aleppo.
Hamid Khatib Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 5:49 pm

In rebel-held parts of Syria, a clash of ideologies is playing out. Powerful Islamist brigades are competing with pro-democracy civilians to shape Syria's future.

One battlefront is in the courts. In many areas in northern Syria, Islamists have set up religious courts that deliver rulings under Shariah, or Islamic law — a fundamental change in Syria's civil legal system.

This is evident on a recent day in a courtroom in the northern Syrian city of Azaz.

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Europe
3:43 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As Global Chains Move In, The Champs Elysees Gets A New Look

Diners eat at Fouquet's restaurant, a landmark on the Champs Elysees in Paris for more than a century. Traditional cafes and shops are steadily giving way to large global chains.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 5:49 pm

Once known as the most beautiful avenue in the world, the Champs Elysees is changing. Some Parisians fear it's starting to look like any American shopping mall as high rents and global chains steadily alter its appearance.

"We just try to keep a sort of diversity on the Champs Elysees, with the cinemas, with restaurants, with cafes and shops," says Deputy Mayor Lynn Cohen-Solal. "We don't think the laws of the natural market, the free market, make for a good Champs Elysees."

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Environment
3:34 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As His Home Melts Away, Teenager Sues Alaska

Nelson Kanuk, a senior at Mt. Edgecumbe High School, is one of six Alaskan youth suing the state, asking it to pay more attention to climate change.
Ed Ronco for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 5:49 pm

Nelson Kanuk's house is built on a melting tundra. In a year or two, it could be gone.

So the 18-year-old Yup'ik Eskimo is suing the state of Alaska, arguing the state needs to take more action on climate change.

"The river that runs in front of my house is called the Kugkaktlik River, and it means 'the middle one' in the Yup'ik language," Kanuk says.

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The Fast World Of Fast Fashion
3:28 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Showing Off Shopping Sprees, Fashion 'Haulers' Cash In Online

Abigail Moscaritolo holds up a recent fashion find on a "haul video." The YouTube trend has become so popular that fashion retailers are approaching haulers to promote their products online.
AbbyLynn401/YouTube

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 5:49 pm

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State Capitol
2:28 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Gov. Fallin Staying Quiet on Teachers With Guns

Credit shannonpatrick17 / Flickr (Creative Commons)

Gov. Mary Fallin says for now, she won't comment on legislation that would allow educators with special training to carry guns inside the state's public schools.

Fallin says it's too early in the legislative process, since bills frequently go through a lot of changes between now and closer to the end of session.

House Bill 1062 is headed to the Senate after winning approval in the House this week.

The proposal would let administrators or teachers in Oklahoma's public schools have a loaded handgun inside the school building after passing special school resource officer training.

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Media
2:24 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jake Tapper Takes A Host Chair At CNN

The veteran reporter has recently moved from ABC News to CNN where he now hosts his own show and serves as Chief Washington Correspondent. In Part II of this interview, Tapper talks about fact-checking the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth and blow back from the White House after asking tough questions.

Author Interviews
2:24 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Two Awards In One Day For 'Battleborn' Author Claire Vaye Watkins

Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection of short stories — Battleborn — is informed by her childhood in the West.
Riverhead Books

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 3:19 pm

The 10 stories in Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection — Battleborn — explore the past and present of the American West, specifically Nevada, where Watkins spent much of her childhood and adolescence. On Wednesday, it was announced that the 28-year-old author had won two major literary prizes for Battleborn: the $10,000 Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the $20,000 Story Prize.

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