Earthquake
12:04 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Earthquake Shakes Central Oklahoma Monday Morning

Magnitude 2.0 and greater Oklahoma earthquakes from 1990-2014.
Credit EQ Charts

The Oklahoma Geological Survey says a 4.4 magnitude earthquake has rocked central Oklahoma.

The quake struck shortly after 11 a.m. Monday and was centered near Langston. It was felt widely through the central part of the state, including Oklahoma City. There are no immediate reports of damage.

Austin Holland with the Oklahoma Geological Survey says the quake had a preliminary depth of 3 miles.

The U.S. Geological Survey, however, reported that the quake had a 4.0 magnitude. Quake magnitudes are often revised after data is reviewed.

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Transportation
9:06 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Roads Or Schools? Oklahoma Transportation Commission Gets Ready For Less Money

Credit Oklahoma Department of Transportation

The Oklahoma Transportation Commission is set to meet and plans to discuss proposed state funding changes that have been passed by a state Senate committee.

The Senate Appropriations Committee last week voted 20-3 for a bill that would divert hundreds of millions of dollars in state revenue from transportation directly to public schools in Oklahoma during the next several years.

The bill now goes to the full Senate.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Signal 'Just Like' Emergency Beacon Detected In Search For Flight 370

Angus Houston displays a map of the search area for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 Monday. Houston says an Australian navy ship has detected underwater signals consistent with aircraft black boxes, calling it the "most promising lead" so far in the month-old search.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 12:13 pm

Calling it the "most promising lead" so far, the leader of the search for a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner says ships have again detected a signal on the same frequency used by "black box" emergency beacons. But Angus Houston also reiterated that it's too early to draw conclusions.

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
7:30 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Take Shelter Oklahoma Vs. AG Scott Pruitt Results In "Mixed Bag" Ruling

Credit benchilada / Flickr Creative Commons

About a month ago, Oklahoma’s Supreme Court heard the case of Take Shelter Oklahoma vs. Attorney General Scott Pruitt.

The school shelter advocacy group filed suit against Pruitt, claiming he tried to sabotage their effort to put a $500 million bond issue on an upcoming ballot. 

The high court ruled last week, and the decision seemed to be a compromise, but not everyone was happy. 

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Shots - Health News
6:54 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Chemo Can Make Food Taste Like Metal. Here's Help

Scott Peterson/One Bite at a Time/Celestial Arts

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 8:08 am

Cancer patients often lose their appetite because chemotherapy can cause nausea. But it does something else to make food unappetizing – it changes the way things taste.

Hollye Jacobs was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010, at the age of 39. As a nurse she expected the extreme nausea that often accompanies powerful chemo therapy drugs. But as a patient, she wasn't expecting the taste changes.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Mickey Rooney, Actor Who Charmed Audiences For More Than 80 Years, Dies

Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney put their heads together over a TV script for their first onstage reunion in 18 years in this 1963 photo.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 9:08 am

Mickey Rooney, the legendary actor who got his first Hollywood role at the age of 6 and starred in more than 200 films over the course of a turbulent career, has died. He was 93.

Charlene Rooney tells the Los Angeles Times that her father-in-law died of natural causes Sunday at the Los Angeles home he shared with her and her husband, Mark Rooney.

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Shots - Health News
6:31 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

How Public Health Advocates Are Trying To Reach Nonvaccinators

A school nurse prepares a vaccine against whooping cough before giving it to students at Mark Twain Middle School in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 10:54 am

Whooping cough made a comeback in California last year, which researchers have linked to vaccine refusals. And with new measles outbreaks in Southern California, New York and British Columbia, the debate over vaccination is also spreading.

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Manager's Desk
9:25 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Thank You For A Fantastic Spring Membership Drive!

Strength in Numbers
Credit Procsilas Moscas / flickr.com/photos/procsilas/

Thank you to the 1,200 or so folks of the audience who became members during the Spring 2014 membership drive. About 250 people became new members! The total for the 7 day event was past goal and totaled nearly $177,350. 

As you might imagine, for the staff of KGOU, the experience of the membership drive is both exhausting and exhilarating. The exhausting part is easy to understand.  The exhilarating part is seeing the names of members set before us from the phone volunteers and staff who process the information.  

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Manager's Desk
8:49 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Krista Tippett Coming To Oklahoma City On April 8

Krista Tippett delivers a TEDTalk at the United Nations TED conference on Charter for Compassion.
Credit Krista Tippett "On Being" / Flickr Creative Commons

I have an invitation for you to meet Krista Tippett, host of the very popular program, “On Being.”

Krista Tippett will be here as a guest of KGOU for a free, public lecture on "The Adventure of Civility" and her presentation will allow for audience questions. Her topic is a reflection on the learnings of the Civil Conversations Project.  Krista will offer courage and practical guidance for creating hospitable spaces in communities and families.

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Environment
7:55 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Feds Hope $5 Billion Settlement A Lesson For Polluters

A sign at the old Kerr-McGee uranium mill site in Grants, N.M., warns of radioactive material. This week, the Justice Department announced a $5 billion settlement against the mining company to pay for the cleanup of toxic sites the company left across the U.S. over a period of more than eight decades.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 10:26 am

This week, the federal government announced a record-breaking $5 billion settlement in a remarkable environmental case. The toxic legacy of the company involved, Kerr-McGee, stretches back 85 years and includes scores of sites across the country.

Kerr-McGee ran uranium mines in the Navajo Nation, wood-treating businesses across the Midwest and East Coast, and a perchlorate plant on a tributary of Lake Mead, the nation's largest reservoir — and it was messy.

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