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Arts and Entertainment

Arts, culture and entertainment

Rockabilly, punk, surf & blues are more than musical genres. For many they represent a certain attitude, outlook and even… a way of life. Those who subscribe to such an outlook accept no substitutes or imposters. That’s where The Vibro Kings come in. This Oklahoma-based trio’s music reflects a genuine appreciation for the aforementioned genres and the kind of ethos each tends to reflect. These guys are serious about their craft and what it says about them & their fans.

Nigella Lawson is one of the food world's biggest international superstars. She’s written 11 cookbooks, hosted TV shows for two decades, and is surprisingly terrible with a knife. While our host Francis Lam has been reading her work for his whole career, he just recently had the chance to meet her in-person when she came to the U.S. to tour for her new book, At My Table.

How The Pony Express Galloped Into History

May 16, 2018

The Pony Express only lasted 18 months, but the mail delivery service remains one of the most enduring icons of the American West — its story told in dime novels and in Westerns like the 1990s TV show “The Young Riders.”

The Pony Express used horse-and-rider relay teams to speed letters across the West just before the start of the Civil War. The 2,000-mile route went from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California — and the Pony could do it in just 10 days.

An Illustrated Memoir Of The War In Syria

May 14, 2018

The humanitarian and military crisis in Syria can be hard to see clearly.

But Marwan Hisham and Molly Crabapple have another way.

Their book Brothers of the Gun combines Crabapple’s illustrations with Hisham’s memoir of the war that’s destroying his country and his former hometown, Raqqa.

Art by Molly Crabapple.

Not so very long ago, everyone agreed when Summer Movie Season kicked off. There was no subjectivity involved. It was dictated by the calendar: Memorial Day weekend meant the arrival of the big tentpole movies that would proceed to bust blocks over the course of the sultry summer months. Simple.

It's not often that a parent and child become masters of two different art forms, but an exhibition at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia proves it's possible: Renoir: Father and Son explores the work of 19th-century Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir and his 20th-century filmmaker son, Jean Renoir.

Like many fathers and sons, they had a loving, but complicated relationship. Take, for example, the fact that in 1920, the year after his father died, Jean married his father's last model.

The list of accolades is long for Rita Moreno. The 86-year-old is the only Latina — and one of just 12 artists overall — to have won an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony for her work. This weekend, she received a different kind of award — for her advocacy. The Ellis Island Honors Society is giving her a medal of honor for her work with immigrant communities.

Michael Balogun might say he's alive today because he's an actor.

Growing up in South London, Balogun stole, he mugged and dealt drugs to survive. He spent much of his younger years in and out of prison and was beginning to think his life would end behind bars.

"The last time I got quite a lengthy sentence, and halfway through that sentence, I was probably misbehaving — getting into a lot of fights, and then I had a moment where I realized that if I carried on living in that way, I'd either end up dead or doing a life sentence," Balogun says.

Virginia Mayhew On Piano Jazz

May 11, 2018

Saxophonist, composer and bandleader Virginia Mayhew has appeared in major New York jazz venues from the Blue Note to Carnegie Hall, toured internationally and twice represented the U.S. as a Jazz Ambassador. She is also an active jazz educator and founded the Greenwich House Music School Jazz Workshop.

On this 1998 episode of Piano Jazz, Mayhew and McPartland join forces to perform "All the Things You Are" and "Body and Soul." They wrap up the show with a free piece, improvised live in studio, and McPartland closes the hour with "Darn that Dream."

Mother's Day brunch recipes you can prepare the night before

May 11, 2018

Brunch is a Mother's Day tradition in many of our homes, and most of us would like for it to be as low-stress as possible. After all, who wants to spend the whole morning scrambling around the kitchen when we should be hanging out with mom. With this in mind, The Splendid Table gathered a few of our favorite Mother's Day brunch recipes that can be prepared the night before and then cooked the morning of. Make the prep work a group activity on Saturday - minus mom, of course, because it's her weekend! Then more time can be spent on Sunday relaxing and enjoying your meal as a family.

The Lucky Losers

The Lucky Losers is a band featuring vocalist Cathy Lemons and vocalist/ harmonica ace Phil Berkowitz.Their music is a throwback to the hybrid of soul, blues, rock, gospel, and country that emerged in the late 1960’s - with harmonies reminiscent of Delaney and Bonnie. 

It isn't typically news when a jazz group makes a change in personnel. But The Bad Plus isn't a typical jazz group, and its announcement, this time last year, landed like a bombshell. In short: Ethan Iverson, the band's pianist, would be leaving to pursue his own projects. Orrin Evans, an esteemed peer, would be stepping in. For a group that has always stood for musical collectivism — and never accepted any substitutions — this was a shakeup of existential proportions.

Writer Zora Neale Hurston could have had her account of Oluale Kossola, believed to be the last known survivor of the Atlantic slave trade, published 87 years ago. But Hurston’s refusal to change the first-person narrative from Kossola’s dialect into traditional American English led publishers to pass on her manuscript.

Recipes To Help You Spring Into Summer

May 9, 2018

Late-spring days are warm — but the evenings can still be chilly. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst brings hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young three dishes that make the most of spring vegetables, but still provide a bit of cool-weather comfort.

Think of the inventions that created the modern world: electric power, computers, the steam engine. These are all important, but there’s one thing they share: precision engineering.

We take precision for granted today, even though we need it for countless daily tasks. Our devices, our cars, airplanes, even electric toothbrushes are built with an exactitude that would’ve been unthinkable two centuries ago.

As Bill Cosby awaits sentencing on his conviction for aggravated indecent assault, prestigious institutions continue to strip the comedian of the accolades bestowed on him throughout his 50-year career.

The latest is the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, whose board voted Monday to rescind the Honors award and the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor that Cosby received in 1998 and 2009, respectively.

Imagine you're at a party with your most favorite music geek friends. The conversations range from favorite new albums, and favorite Smiths or Belle and Sebastian B-sides to best Neil Young guitar solos and Drake features. Then comes the big one: What was the greatest year in music? That's a question that we discuss and debate regularly in the World Cafe offices.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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