Arts and Entertainment

Assignment: Radio
12:38 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

What It Means To "Keep It Local"

Credit alice_henneman

Customers have more choice than ever, with national retailers, local stores, and now internet shopping. Assignment Radio’s Madeline Stebbins examines the effects of local shopping in Norman.

The “shop local” movement has gained momentum the last few years. But beyond the hype, past the fad – does shopping local really matter?

Bryce Bandy:  Up to three times as much of the money stays in your community when you spend it with a local and independent business, as opposed to a big box or a franchise.

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Assignment: Radio
11:24 am
Tue April 1, 2014

A New Kind Of Classroom

Credit ota_photos

More than six million higher education students are taking at least one course online, according to a 2011 study by the Babson Survey Research Group. At the University of Oklahoma, approximately 3,000 students are taking advantage of the college’s current online options. Assignment Radio reporter, Molly Evans, spoke with an English major and leaders of OU’s digital initiatives about incorporating online learning into the traditional college experience. A sea of more than 30,000 students floods the University of Oklahoma’s campuses each year.

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Assignment: Radio
11:15 am
Tue April 1, 2014

The Diet Fit For A Caveman

Credit Dollen

As the name suggests the Paleo diet takes you back to caveman days, no preservatives, no processed grains and no fast food at all... Assignment Radio's Hayley Thornton explored what it means to go Paleo.

Emily Groff: From my point of view it’s a very  nutritious kind of back to natural way of eating, which is why the certain foods are included and I have read a lot of books and done a lot of research into it, and its really about eating what’s best for your body.

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3:16 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

KGOU Radio Show Takes Listeners Behind The Jazz

Lead in text: 
Friday evening's debut episode of "Backstage Jazz" season two will feature New Orleans' renowned Preservation Hall Jazz Band.
Jeremy Gossett first developed his affinity for jazz after listening to Jim Wilke's "Jazz After Hours" late-night show on public radio. Now, he is sharing the love with his own radio show, "Backstage Jazz," which is launching its second season at 9 p.m.
Live Music
2:22 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Graham Colton’s New Album Rekindles Old Feelings

Graham Colton
Credit grahamcoltonmusic.com

Listen to Jim Johnson's audio profile of Oklahoma native Graham Colton and his new album "Lonely Ones."

Recapturing one’s youth is the promise of many potions and product makers.  But, for Oklahoma-born musician Graham Colton, the desire to reclaim the past had nothing to do with appearances.

At the same time the 32 year-old matured as a successful entertainer, Colton longed for that feeling he enjoyed some twelve years ago when it was all brand new. It’s a goal he seems to have achieved while working on the material for his new, self-produced album Lonely Ones.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
1:28 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Dianne Reeves On Piano Jazz

Dianne Reeves.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 13, 2011 11:33 am

This Piano Jazz episode from 1999 features one of today's preeminent jazz singers. Dianne Reeves brings her rhythmic virtuosity to a sparkling set of standards, including duets with host Marian McPartland on "Close Enough for Love" and "Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise."

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A Blog Supreme
10:34 am
Fri March 28, 2014

'A Love Supreme' Comes Alive In Unearthed Photos

John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964.
Chuck Stewart Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Whenever photographer Chuck Stewart was hired by a record company to document a recording session, he would shoot during the rehearsal takes, playback and downtime. The company would take what it needed, the remainder likely never to be developed, much less published. After decades in the photography business, and thousands of album covers to his name, he's amassed a lot of negatives.

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Performing Arts
11:47 am
Thu March 27, 2014

From Walter White To LBJ, Bryan Cranston Is A Master Of Transformation

Over the course of Breaking Bad, Walter White (Bryan Cranston) metamorphosed from a high school chemistry teacher to a notorious outlaw.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 2:15 pm

In the 2008 pilot of AMC's Breaking Bad, high school teacher Walter White fails to interest his chemistry students in the study of change. But over the course of the series, Walt himself came to exemplify radical change, using his knowledge of chemistry to become a master meth cook, and transforming himself into a notorious outlaw who was willing to kill, when necessary, to keep his operation running.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
10:36 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Jane Bunnett And Chihiro Yamanaka On JazzSet

Jane Bunnett (left) and Candido perform at the Kennedy Center during the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival.
Margot Schulman Courtesy of the Kennedy Center

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 3:48 pm

Chihiro Yamanaka and Jane Bunnett come to the Kennedy Center from Japan and Canada, respectively, and each has a compelling story.

Jane Bunnett is from Toronto, yet for more than 30 years, she's championed Cuban music and musicians. She's made dozens of trips to the island, studying and working, bringing instruments to schoolchildren, and inviting players to return to Canada with her and her husband, trumpeter Larry Cramer.

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Theater
1:57 am
Thu March 27, 2014

At 81, Playwright Athol Fugard Looks Back On Aging And Apartheid

In 1961, South African playwright Athol Fugard put black and white actors on stage together in his breakout play Blood Knot. He's pictured above in the 1970s.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:18 am

Under apartheid, trying to make an artistic political statement was difficult — artists were subject to scrutiny and even arrest. On the other hand, making a political statement was easy: All one had to do was put black and white actors on a stage together.

That's exactly what South African playwright Athol Fugard did back in 1961 with his breakout play Blood Knot. His newest play, The Shadow of the Hummingbird, is now onstage at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn.

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