Arts and Entertainment

Jazz Night In America: The Radio Program
1:34 am
Thu December 4, 2014

Johnny O'Neal: Listen, Closely

Johnny O'Neal performs at Mezzrow.
NPR

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 12:53 am

Mezzrow is New York City's newest listening room: an intimate club for solo and duo performers where silence and attention are more than encouraged. It's a bit of a throwback, as is its Monday night host Johnny O'Neal. A virtuoso who shot onto the scene in the 1980s, the pianist is now re-establishing his presence in New York after decades off the radar. And on Mondays, he holds court at Mezzrow, singing the blues and welcoming guest after guest onto the tiny stage.

Jazz Night in America stops into the Greenwich Village club to listen closely.

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Assignment: Radio
1:15 am
Wed December 3, 2014

After The Fall: The Loss That Came With German Re-unification

Credit Berit Watkin

In 1989, the Berlin wall was dismantled and by the next year, Germany was once again one country.  That meant consolidating East and West Germany, and often the West’s laws and culture prevailed over those of the East.

University of Oklahoma International Studies professor Rebecca Cruise is an expert on Eastern Europe.

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Assignment: Radio
1:15 am
Wed December 3, 2014

Germany's Fascination With Native American Culture

Credit Eklectique-photo

Last month marked the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The University of Oklahoma held a symposium commemorating the event. Guest speakers came from around the world to lecture about their specific knowledge base around the fall of the Berlin Wall. Assignment: Radio’s Hayley Thornton attended expecting to learn about a culture on another continent. Instead she learned about German’s fascination with a culture closer to home.

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Performing Arts
5:24 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

Lyricist Adolph Green's Influence Remains 100 Years After His Birth

Originally published on Mon December 15, 2014 1:48 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:35 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

From Feeling Lost To Army Strong, With The Help Of Poetry

Daisy Armstrong began performing poetry when her mother took her to a youth poetry group. Soon, she was winning competitions — but she was also kicked out of school after a slam poetry tour.
Daniel Schaefer Courtesy of OutlierImagery.com

Originally published on Wed December 17, 2014 5:56 pm

For young people who don't succeed in high school, joining the military can seem like a good option, particularly when there are few other job prospects.

But Dejanique "Daisy" Armstrong, a young, gay woman from Stockton, Calif., never planned to enlist in the Army. She ultimately made that choice as a last resort.

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Indian Times
11:42 am
Mon December 1, 2014

8th Annual Native American Benefit Concert

Credit Native American Christmas Benefit

The annual Native American Benefit Concert was founded by Dr. Daryl Tonemah with one goal - to give native children a better Christmas. Tonemah accomplishes this by holding a benefit concert for which the price of admission is a new toy or new article of children's clothing.

“We all are pretty much aware of the statistics about poverty and under employment and lack of educational attainment for natives, not only across the country but here in Oklahoma,” Ron McIntosh (Muscogee Creek) said.

McIntosh is one of the organizers of this year’s Annual Native American Benefit Concert to take place Friday, December 5 at Rose State College.

“One of the things that Daryl Tonemah, who actually started this about 15 years ago in Phoenix - one of the things that he recognized, and that we've tried to carry on - is that it is up to us to take care of our own kids,” McIntosh said.

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Music Interviews
5:16 pm
Sun November 30, 2014

At 86, A 'Jazz Child' Looks Back On A Life Of Sunshine, Sorrow

Jazz vocalist Sheila Jordan doesn't mind that, despite her critical acclaim, she's not a household name. "The people that respect what I do and hire me, that's all I need, you know?" she says. "I just need to keep doing this music as long as I live. "
Richard Laird Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun November 30, 2014 5:43 pm

Many fans first encountered one of the great voices in jazz as a whisper: Sheila Jordan made a quiet but lasting impression as a guest singer on pianist George Russell's 1962 arrangement of "You Are My Sunshine."

Since then, Jordan's career has taken her all over the world, and in 2012, she received one of the highest honors in jazz: she became an National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master. Her music has soared, but her story starts with pain.

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Arts and Entertainment
5:37 am
Sun November 30, 2014

Oklahoma Lawmakers Tour Kansas Capitol While Supreme Court Decides If Bond Issue Is Constitutional

Barricades surround the south steps of the Oklahoma Capitol.
Credit Meghan Blessing / KGOU

Officials in Oklahoma are getting some tips from their counterparts in Kansas before launching a multi-year, multi-million dollar restoration project on Oklahoma's 100-year-old state Capitol.

More than a dozen Oklahoma lawmakers and managers of the Capitol restoration project traveled to Topeka, Kansas, this week to examine that state's Capitol, where this year a nearly $330 million, 13-year restoration project was completed.

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Movie Interviews
11:05 am
Sat November 29, 2014

Documentary Recalls The Talented, Difficult Life Of Bing Crosby

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Bing Crosby is the voice of Christmas still.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHITE CHRISTMAS")

BING CROSBY: (Singing) I'm dreaming of a white Christmas just like the ones I used to know.

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Code Switch
10:41 am
Sat November 29, 2014

A Musical Tribute For A Waiter Who Spoke Out Against Racism

Justin Hopkins sings during a tribute show for Booker Wright, who worked in a whites-only restaurant in the Mississippi Delta.
Brandall Atkinson Courtesy of Southern Foodways Alliance

Originally published on Sat November 29, 2014 11:05 am

Editor's note: This story contains racial slurs.

A new musical work pays tribute to an unlikely and little-known civil rights activist: Booker T. Wright. You won't find his name in history textbooks. But his story is a testament to the everyday experiences of blacks in the Jim Crow South.

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