Arts and Entertainment

Exhibit
9:57 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Depression, Postwar Photos Displayed in New Oklahoma Exhibit

Boy with Goggles, 1947
Horace Bristol (1908-1997) The Horace and Masako Bristol Trust

Listen as Mark White with the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art describes some of the photographs in the museum's latest exhibition.

Depression-era Oklahoma migrants, World War II combat and postwar Japan are subjects of a new photography exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The museum at the University of Oklahoma opens On Assignment: the Photojournalism of Horace Bristol to the public Saturday.

A public lecture Friday at 6 p.m. on Friday precedes a private exhibition opening reception for Museum Association members and their guests at 7 p.m.

Through his photo essays for LIFE, Fortune and Time magazines, Bristol exposed American audiences to the dismal conditions facing Oklahoma migrants during the Great Depression, the triumphs and horrors of combat during World War II, and the realities of Japanese life following the war.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
2:46 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Amir ElSaffar And Two Rivers On JazzSet

Two Rivers achieves long meters at breakneck speeds, even in non-Western modes and odd.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:33 am

"I feel as though there's almost two streams going through my veins, two bloodstreams," says trumpeter and composer Amir ElSaffar, leader of Two Rivers. "A lot of my life has been about reconciling the two."

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OneSix8
8:37 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Entertaining the Hours of Your Week: Family Festivities

Credit vaishnavi

This week's OneSix8 is all about events for the family. If you want to sing and dance, or just enjoy some artistic expression this weekend has a lot of options.

For encouraging self-expression, Oklahoma Peer-to-Peer-Drop-In Center hosts “My Feelings are a Work of Art” November 15 and 16 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Kitchen Window
11:03 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

New Nordic Is Cool, But Old Scandinavian Food Holds Its Own

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 7:08 am

When Copenhagen's Noma was named the world's best restaurant a few years ago, it introduced a wider audience to the concept of New Nordic cuisine. A movement that swept Scandinavia (and, subsequently, the rest of the culinary world), New Nordic combines the oft-maligned and little known local ingredients with modern technique and playful vision. Reindeer and lichen, meet Thermomix and Pacojet.

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A Blog Supreme
5:23 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Soul From A Console: Jazz On The Hammond B-3 Organ

Larry Goldings is known for his skill on both organ and piano.
Courtesy of the artist

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Music Reviews
10:08 am
Mon November 11, 2013

No Need To Cook The Books: Booker Ervin's Debut LP Reissued

Booker Ervin on the cover of The Book Cooks, his debut album.
Courtesy of Bethlehem Records

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 12:42 pm

Tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin came to New York in 1958. Pianist Horace Parlan heard him and invited Ervin to sit in one night with a band he worked in. That's how Ervin got hired by bassist Charles Mingus, who featured him on albums like Blues and Roots and Mingus Ah Um.

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Theater
4:11 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Here's A Wild Idea For Shakespeare: Do It His Way

Mark Rylance as Olivia (right) and Samuel Barnett as Viola in Twelfth Night. The Broadway production, which first played at London's Globe Theatre, is done in the Elizabethan tradition, with an all-male cast.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:54 am

This season, New York audiences have seen wildly different interpretations of Shakespeare plays. They've seen the Romeo of Orlando Bloom make his first entrance on a motorcycle; they've seen a production of Julius Caesar set in a women's prison.

Now the London-based company from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre has landed on Broadway with what seems like the most radical concept of them all: plays staged in a style Shakespeare would've recognized, with all-male casts, period costumes and live music.

Not A Museum

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Music Interviews
4:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Can I Kick It? Organ Master Lonnie Smith Can

Dr. Lonnie Smith's In the Beginning, a new album that reimagines the artist's older, out-of-print work, is out now.
Susan Stocker Courtesy of the artist

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Tiny Desk Concerts
10:14 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Gary Burton: Tiny Desk Concert

American jazz vibraphonist Gary Burton plays a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 13, 2013.
Abbey Oldham NPR

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 4:03 pm

In 1963, the jazz pianist George Shearing, an enormously popular act in his day, made an album that was unusual for him. He asked his new, 20-year-old vibraphone player to write an album of contrapuntal, classical-music-inspired compositions, and recorded them with a woodwind quintet atop a jazz rhythm section. It's out of print now, but Out of the Woods received good reviews, and it remains an early career highlight for its young architect, Gary Burton.

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Theater
6:14 am
Sat November 9, 2013

'We Will Rock You': A Bohemian Musical

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 10:24 am

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Don Gonyea. Whether or not you're a fan of rock and roll, you've surely heard at least one of the hits by Queen. The British band dominated the airwaves in the '70s and '80s and now their music is rocking the world again, this time in a jukebox musical called "We Will Rock You."

The show has been running in London for a dozen years but now an Americanized version is touring the United States and Canada. NPR's Allison Keyes was at the opening show in Baltimore.

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