Education

Education
8:00 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Hofmeister Unveils Five-Year Education Plan

Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma State Schools Superintendent
Credit Provided

Oklahoma's newly elected Superintendent of Public Instruction is unveiling a new five-year plan to give Oklahoma teachers a $5,000 pay raise over the next five years, along with an additional five days of instruction to the school year, also added over five years.

Republican Joy Hofmeister announced the plan on Monday, saying increased teacher pay is critically important in addressing a significant teacher shortage in Oklahoma. The first year of the proposal would cost the state about $150 million.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Mon January 26, 2015

Competency-Based Degree Programs On The Rise

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:22 pm

Competency-based education is in vogue — even though most people have never heard of it, and those who have can't always agree on what it is.

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Education
8:27 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Joy Hofmeister Wants To Improve Public Education

New State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister faces big challenges in the effort to improve Oklahoma’s public education.

A recently released report ranks Oklahoma 48th out of 50 states and the District of Columbia for the quality of education provided to students.

Oklahoma education faces financial challenges and growing teacher shortages.

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Secret Lives Of Teachers
7:13 am
Sun January 25, 2015

'Walking The Walk' With Students ... And Screaming Fans

Elementary teachers Nicola Berlinsky, Joanie Pimentel and Lisa Pimentel perform as the punk band No Small Children.
Michael Dann

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:52 am

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

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Around the Nation
4:20 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

By Dimming Its Lights, Museum Opens Doors For Kids With Autism

One Saturday each month, the Pacific Science Center of Seattle opens early for people with autism spectrum disorders.
John Keatley Pacific Science Center

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:18 am

On a Saturday at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Wash., life-size robotic dinosaurs roar. A giant video monitor shows a person sneezing as a spray of mist shoots down from the ceiling. Nearby, naked mole rats scurry blindly through a maze of tunnels.

And since it's all mud and rain outside, the place is packed with curious children and adults trying to keep up with them.

Loud noises, bright lights, crowded spaces: This is exactly the situation Mike Hiner tries to avoid with his 20-year-old son Steven, who is autistic.

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Politics
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

U.S. Once Had Universal Child Care, But Rebuilding It Won't Be Easy

Julie Byard, head of a Detroit nursery, tells children stories and sings them songs prior to their afternoon nap in 1942.
AP

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:41 pm

Stumping in Kansas after his State of the Union, the president said that for most parents working today, child care is more than a "side issue," and that improving access "is a national economic priority for all of us."

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NPR Story
4:58 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

UVA Sororities Push To Host Their Own Parties

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 2:49 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Nicolette Gendron, a member of Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority at the University of Virginia and a writer for the C-Ville Weekly. She did a survey of sorority members on campus about how they would feel if sororities were allowed to serve alcohol and host parties under the same rules as fraternities. She says most women, including herself, feel that women would have more control and feel safer from sexual predation if they could host parties in their own houses.

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Education
4:44 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

New State Superintendent Hofmeister Fills Policy Research Post

Joy Hofmeister, Oklahoma State Schools Superintendent
Credit Provided

New Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister has named a longtime educator from the Oklahoma City area as the first person to take a leadership position in her administration.

Hofmeister said Thursday that Robyn Miller will oversee policy research and development as well as teacher quality initiatives for the state Department of Education.

Miller comes to the agency from Oklahoma Christian University in Edmond, where she has served as chair of the School of Education since 2007.

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Education
1:03 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Natalie Shirley Appointed Secretary Of Education And Workforce Development

Natalie Shirley
Credit Provided / Gov. Mary Fallin's Office

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has named Natalie Shirley secretary of education and workforce development.

Shirley has been president of Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City since 2011 and is the first female president in the OSU system. Fallin named her to the cabinet secretary's post Thursday and she will begin serving in the position on Monday.

Fallin says one of her top priorities for 2015 is to increase educational attainment in Oklahoma and that Shirley will lead the way for providing the skills people need to get a good job.

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NPR Ed
8:33 am
Thu January 22, 2015

The Past, Present And Future Of High-Stakes Testing

PublicAffairs Books

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 11:57 am

After a long stretch as the law of the land, annual standardized tests are being put to, well, the test.

This week, the Senate education committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law and, specifically, on testing. The committee's chairman, Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has released a draft bill offering a lot more leeway to states in designing their own assessment systems.

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