Education

Education
10:03 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Tough Lessons For Teachers Of Color

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now. If you have school-age children, they're either home from school this week or just about to go back, so you're probably thinking ahead to what your student will be doing this spring or maybe even doing some snooping about who his or her teacher will be next year. But what you might not know is that for a fair number of teachers, this could be the beginning of the end of their teaching careers.

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Can One Girl Challenge The Traditions Of Her Village?

"It doesn't matter, your background. What matters is what you take from the opportunity you're given, where you go with that." — Kakenya Ntaiya
Ray Ortega TED

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 1:48 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Overcoming.

About Kakenya Ntaiya's TEDTalk

Kakenya Ntaiya tells the fearless story of challenging ingrained traditions, insisting on continuing school, and becoming the first girl to leave her Maasai village for college.

About Kakenya Ntaiya

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Math and Science
8:48 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Two Oklahoma Teachers Receive Presidential Math, Science Honor

Credit comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

The 2014 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching is being presented to two Oklahoma teachers — including one who died Dec. 5.

Teachers Diane Reece of Bokoshe Elementary and Carol Huett of Kelley Elementary in Moore have been announced as the Oklahoma recipients of the award.

Reece died Dec. 5 after a disease that affects bone marrow and blood cells developed into leukemia.

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Afraid Her Views Would Be Twisted
6:27 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Barresi Won't Meet With Oklahoma Education Association

Credit OSDE / Flickr.com

State Superintendent Janet Barresi says she has no plans to meet with an Oklahoma association that represents about 35,000 teachers, school staff and retirees.

Oklahoma Education Association President Linda Hampton said Thursday she was surprised to learn Barresi had turned down the group's request to have her speak to their members. In a press release on Wednesday, Barresi said she didn't want to have her views "filtered through the lens of liberal union bosses."

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Code Switch
11:11 am
Thu January 2, 2014

A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Fisk University physics student Terreka Hart (foreground, left) looks on with a group of students from the Bridge Program — Melanie Brady, Bobby Jones, Rose Perea (seated) and Brenden Wiggins (pointing).
C. Coca Fisk University

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 5:06 pm

There is a widespread narrative in higher education that goes something like this: Colleges and universities have always accepted the best and brightest students; then, due to pressure from outside forces (some of them named "John F. Kennedy"), diversity was thrust upon the academy. In turn, schools meted out race-based scholarships, relaxed standards for certain students in order to fulfill quotas and — poof! — diversity.

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Education
4:30 am
Thu January 2, 2014

After Radical Change, R.I. School Shows Signs Of Improvement

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Rhode Island's Central Falls High School made headlines in 2010 for a pretty dramatic reason: The school board fired all of its teachers as part of a draconian plan to turn around a school experiencing serious problems. The teachers were later rehired, and now, four years later, a series of reforms at Central Falls High appear to be helping. Elisabeth Harrison from Rhode Island Public Radio has the story.

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Education
4:25 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Critics Say Schools' Common Core Standards Rollout Is Rushed

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 7:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Around the Nation
3:46 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Online Education Revolution Drifts Off Course

Students at the Oakland Military Institute took several courses offered by San Jose State and the online course provider Udacity this year. The university is now scaling back its relationship with Udacity.
Laura A. Oda MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 6:23 pm

One year ago, many were pointing to the growth of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, as the most important trend in higher education. Many saw the rapid expansion of MOOCs as a higher education revolution that would help address two long-vexing problems: access for underserved students and cost.

In theory, students saddled by rising debt and unable to tap into the best schools would be able to take free classes from rock star professors at elite schools via Udacity, edX, Coursera and other MOOC platforms.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

On Evolution, A Widening Political Gap, Pew Says

A drawing of the scientific theory of evolution, which states that living things evolve over time.
Martin Wimmer iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 6:45 pm

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on their views of the scientific theory of evolution is widening, according to a new poll released by Pew's Religion & Public Life Project.

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All Tech Considered
3:38 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Because You Liked Chemistry, We Recommend These Classes

Rudyanto Wijaya iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 5:51 pm

The same kind of technology that recommends movies on Netflix or purchases on Amazon is now helping students choose college courses.

A new program developed on a campus in Tennessee uses predictive analytics to suggest classes, and now the technology is spreading across the country and is seen as a way to make higher education more efficient.

On average, graduates take a year's worth of classes they could have done without, or they drop courses before making a bad grade. For Nashville State Community College student Jonathan Hudspeth, it was anatomy and physiology.

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