Education

Math and Science
8:48 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Two Oklahoma Teachers Receive Presidential Math, Science Honor

Credit comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

The 2014 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching is being presented to two Oklahoma teachers — including one who died Dec. 5.

Teachers Diane Reece of Bokoshe Elementary and Carol Huett of Kelley Elementary in Moore have been announced as the Oklahoma recipients of the award.

Reece died Dec. 5 after a disease that affects bone marrow and blood cells developed into leukemia.

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Afraid Her Views Would Be Twisted
6:27 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Barresi Won't Meet With Oklahoma Education Association

Credit OSDE / Flickr.com

State Superintendent Janet Barresi says she has no plans to meet with an Oklahoma association that represents about 35,000 teachers, school staff and retirees.

Oklahoma Education Association President Linda Hampton said Thursday she was surprised to learn Barresi had turned down the group's request to have her speak to their members. In a press release on Wednesday, Barresi said she didn't want to have her views "filtered through the lens of liberal union bosses."

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Code Switch
11:11 am
Thu January 2, 2014

A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Fisk University physics student Terreka Hart (foreground, left) looks on with a group of students from the Bridge Program — Melanie Brady, Bobby Jones, Rose Perea (seated) and Brenden Wiggins (pointing).
C. Coca Fisk University

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 5:06 pm

There is a widespread narrative in higher education that goes something like this: Colleges and universities have always accepted the best and brightest students; then, due to pressure from outside forces (some of them named "John F. Kennedy"), diversity was thrust upon the academy. In turn, schools meted out race-based scholarships, relaxed standards for certain students in order to fulfill quotas and — poof! — diversity.

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Education
4:30 am
Thu January 2, 2014

After Radical Change, R.I. School Shows Signs Of Improvement

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Rhode Island's Central Falls High School made headlines in 2010 for a pretty dramatic reason: The school board fired all of its teachers as part of a draconian plan to turn around a school experiencing serious problems. The teachers were later rehired, and now, four years later, a series of reforms at Central Falls High appear to be helping. Elisabeth Harrison from Rhode Island Public Radio has the story.

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Education
4:25 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Critics Say Schools' Common Core Standards Rollout Is Rushed

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 7:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Around the Nation
3:46 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Online Education Revolution Drifts Off Course

Students at the Oakland Military Institute took several courses offered by San Jose State and the online course provider Udacity this year. The university is now scaling back its relationship with Udacity.
Laura A. Oda MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 6:23 pm

One year ago, many were pointing to the growth of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, as the most important trend in higher education. Many saw the rapid expansion of MOOCs as a higher education revolution that would help address two long-vexing problems: access for underserved students and cost.

In theory, students saddled by rising debt and unable to tap into the best schools would be able to take free classes from rock star professors at elite schools via Udacity, edX, Coursera and other MOOC platforms.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

On Evolution, A Widening Political Gap, Pew Says

A drawing of the scientific theory of evolution, which states that living things evolve over time.
Martin Wimmer iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 6:45 pm

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on their views of the scientific theory of evolution is widening, according to a new poll released by Pew's Religion & Public Life Project.

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All Tech Considered
3:38 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Because You Liked Chemistry, We Recommend These Classes

Rudyanto Wijaya iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 5:51 pm

The same kind of technology that recommends movies on Netflix or purchases on Amazon is now helping students choose college courses.

A new program developed on a campus in Tennessee uses predictive analytics to suggest classes, and now the technology is spreading across the country and is seen as a way to make higher education more efficient.

On average, graduates take a year's worth of classes they could have done without, or they drop courses before making a bad grade. For Nashville State Community College student Jonathan Hudspeth, it was anatomy and physiology.

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Education
9:31 am
Sun December 29, 2013

A Campus More Colorful Than Reality: Beware That College Brochure

In an effort to show diversity, University of Wisconsin officials added the face of a black student, Diallo Shabazz, to a file photo for the cover of the school's 2000 application booklet.
AP

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 10:12 am

Diallo Shabazz was a student at the University of Wisconsin in 2000 when he stopped by the admissions office.

"One of the admissions counselors walked up to me, and said, 'Diallo, did you see yourself in the admissions booklet? Actually, you're on the cover this year,' " Shabazz says.

The photo was a shot of students at a football game — but Shabazz had never been to a football game.

"So I flipped back, and that's when I saw my head cut off and kind of pasted onto the front cover of the admissions booklet," he says.

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Education
4:09 am
Sun December 29, 2013

Closing The 'Word Gap' Between Rich And Poor

In Virginia this summer, Arlington Public Schools transported students in poor neighborhoods to community libraries for group readings. Studies say children from low-income families may hear roughly 30 million fewer words by age 3 than their more affluent peers.
Bill O'Leary The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 10:12 am

In the early 1990s, a team of researchers decided to follow about 40 volunteer families — some poor, some middle class, some rich — during the first three years of their new children's lives. Every month, the researchers recorded an hour of sound from the families' homes. Later in the lab, the team listened back and painstakingly tallied up the total number of words spoken in each household.

What they found came to be known as the "word gap."

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