All Tech Considered
5:55 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

More Black, Latino Teens Say They're Online 'Almost Constantly'

About one-third of black and Hispanic teens say they're online just about all the time, compared with about 1 in 5 whites, a new study says.
27 Studios/Getty Images

Boys like Facebook, girls like Instagram. Wealthier kids Snapchat. Lower income kids Facebook. And somehow Google+ is still relevant.

So says the Pew Research Center's latest study, "Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015," in which we officially learn that teenagers spend as much time online as adults think they do:

  • 92 percent of teens report going online daily.
  • 24 percent say they go online "almost constantly."
Read more
Goats and Soda
2:09 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Dear World, Your Grade For Educating Your Children Is ...

India is definitely making progress in getting more kids into school. This facility is in Bhubaneswar.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:19 pm

It seems like a simple goal: All kids should go to primary school.

People began talking about it in the 1960s. And they kept talking about it. "Everyone thought it was pretty doable; it wasn't too big of a deal," recalls Aaron Benavot, director of UNESCO's Education for All Global Monitoring Report.

But for lots of reasons — cutbacks on government spending, no schoolhouse within an easy commute — it just wasn't happening. So in 2000, 164 nations got together and pledged "Education For All" by 2015.

Read more
7:03 am
Thu April 9, 2015

A Classic Prep For Parenthood, But Is The Egg All It's Cracked Up To Be?

Egg babies created by Aaron Warren's ninth-grade students at Orthopaedic Hospital Medical Magnet High School in Los Angeles.
Courtesy of Aaron Warren

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 2:40 pm

For the series Tools of the Trade we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling.

Read more
11:26 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Think Tuition Is Rising Fast? Try Room And Board

Universities can have a hard time resisting the lure of luxury, which keeps room and board prices rising.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:46 pm

Valerie Inniss took out $11,500 in student loans this year to pay for the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

None of it was for tuition.

The 21-year-old is on a four-year, full-tuition scholarship, won on the strength of her high school test scores. And she qualifies for the maximum federal Pell Grant — $5,730 — for low-income students.

Read more
The Salt
3:58 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Aspiring Craft Brewers Hit The Books To Pick Up Science Chops

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 11:20 am

Here's how popular craft brewed beer is these days: On average, a new brewery opens its doors every single day in the the U.S.

Read more
2:48 am
Wed April 8, 2015

States Review Laws Revoking Licenses For Student Loan Defaults

In 22 states, people who default on their student loans can have professional licenses suspended or revoked. The percentage of Americans who default on student loans has more than doubled since 2003.
Butch Dill AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 5:21 pm

Clementine Lindley says she had a great college experience, but if she had it to do over again, she probably wouldn't pick an expensive private school.

"I could actually buy a small home in Helena, Mont., with the amount of debt that I graduated with," she says.

Fresh out of school, Lindley says there were times when she had to decide whether to pay rent, buy food or make her student loan payments.

"There was a time where I defaulted on my student loans enough that I never was sent to collections, but just long enough to, honestly, ruin my credit."

Read more
1:33 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Mexican-American Toddlers: Understanding The Achievement Gap

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 11:56 am

Mexican-American toddlers born in the U.S. do not develop nearly as fast as white toddlers when it comes to language and pre-literacy skills. That's the main finding of a new study by the Institute of Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley.

Read more
2:23 am
Tue April 7, 2015

A New Orleans High School Adapts To Unaccompanied Minors

G.W. Carver Preparatory Academy has enrolled more than 50 unaccompanied minors from Central America. Principal Ben Davis says he's spending an extra $2,500 per student for special education services and instructional software tailored for them.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 2:03 pm

For the past year now, many Americans have been hearing and reading about the 68,000 unaccompanied minors who have crossed illegally into the U.S. Nearly all of these minors come from El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras, and since their arrival, immigration officials have released most of them to their parents or relatives who already live in this country.

A number of these children and teenagers are in deportation proceedings, but while they wait, they have been allowed to attend public schools. In Louisiana, schools have enrolled nearly 2,000 of them.

Read more
Michel Martin, Going There
2:21 am
Tue April 7, 2015

New Orleans Educator Dreams Of Teaching Tech To Beat The Streets

New Orleans educator Jonathan Johnson is founder and CEO of the Rooted School.
Jonathan Johnson

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 4:49 pm

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, much has been rebuilt in New Orleans — including the public schools. But the current education system is radically different from the one that people who grew up in New Orleans remember. Virtually all students in the city now attend charter schools. Many of their teachers are both new to New Orleans and new to teaching.

Read more
5:07 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

Report Shreds 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story, But Many On Campus Have Moved On

An independent review of a Rolling Stone article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia found fundamental errors in the way the story was reported and edited. University President Teresa Sullivan said the story had damaged campus efforts to address sexual assault.
Zach Gibson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 12:49 pm

A report released Sunday about a Rolling Stone magazine story detailing an alleged rape at the University of Virginia is one more chapter in a long, troubling story for the campus.

Read more