Education

The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Optional Essay And Other Changes Coming To The SAT

They'll need new prep books.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 6:43 pm

  • NPR's Claudio Sanchez Discusses The College Board Announcement On 'All Things Considered'

The essay is optional. Scores will return to 1,600. And there will be no penalties if you answer something incorrectly. Those are the big takeaways from the SAT changes announced Wednesday.

The College Board said the revisions, the first updates to the college entrance exam since 2005, will take effect in 2016.

Other changes announced: Certain vocabulary words will be dropped in favor of those more commonly used in school and at work, and test-takers will have the option to take the SAT on a computer.

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Oklahoma Watch
12:04 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

The Reading Scramble: Teachers Prep Third Graders For Read-Or-Fail

Credit Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch

Two years ago, when Oklahoma third-grade students took the state’s annual reading test, nearly 5,500 them, or 11 percent, failed.

Last year, the results were worse, despite a stepped-up focus on reading instruction: 12 percent of third graders scored at the lowest of four levels, unsatisfactory, meaning they were still reading at about a first-grade level.

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Open Meetings
8:16 am
Wed March 5, 2014

State Board Of Education Gets Redo On Previous Votes

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Janet Barresi

The State Board of Education held a special meeting Tuesday to approve once again previously voted on actions from their Feb. 27 monthly meeting in Enid.

The board neglected to file its change of location from Oklahoma City to Enid with the Secretary of State’s Office 10 days in advance of that meeting as required by the Open Meeting Act, making all votes taken that day invalid.

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The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Teen Sues Parents, Claiming They Owe Her Money For College

Rachel Canning (right) sits with her friend Jaime Inglesino during a hearing Tuesday at the Morris County Courthouse in New Jersey.
John O'Boyle AP

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 10:56 am

A judge held an unusual hearing in New Jersey on Tuesday: a lawsuit brought by an 18-year-old who says her parents kicked her out of their house. Rachel Canning is seeking to force her parents to give her financial support and money for college, in addition to pay for tuition at her private school.

Superior Court Family Division Judge Peter Bogaard, who heard the case in Morristown, N.J., on Tuesday afternoon, denied Canning's requests in what's seen as the first round of hearings in the case.

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Education
3:37 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

As a Test Gets Phased Out In Chicago, Some Boycott Its Final Year

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's testing time in Illinois today. Hundreds of thousands of students began taking state tests in math and science but some students, parents, even teachers are refusing. At dozens of schools in Chicago, they're staging a boycott, saying the tests don't matter. As NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, it's part of a growing national debate over measuring student performance.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Boycott the ISAT. Let things be. Boycott the ISAT.

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Parenting
11:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Should Kindergarteners Stop Finger Painting And Start Learning French?

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:16 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Technology
11:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Can Playing Minecraft Teach Kids To Code?

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:16 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to talk about a popular form of entertainment - video games. And you may fall into one of two camps here - love them or at least you understand why people can spend hours playing them, or hate them and you associate them with mindless violence, sexism and or just a waste of time. Well, if you're in the hate or don't-understand-them category, you might not be familiar with Minecraft. But it's one of the most popular games out there right now. It has more than 100 million registered users.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMERCIAL)

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Hispanics Struggle To Graduate: An Issue of School Choice?

Hispanics are less likely than other groups to enroll in four-year schools. They're also harder to find in stock photos.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:59 pm

Angela Barba was the first in her immediate family to graduate from high school. And when the time came for her son Robert to follow in her footsteps, she says, she found herself overwhelmed.

"I had no idea how I was going to get him into college," she says.

Angela, who had completed a two-year degree herself, says she wanted her son to be the first in the family to complete a four-year program. But she couldn't really offer any advice or guidance as to what schools to attend or how to apply for scholarships.

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Education
5:56 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Ex-'Post' Owner Raises Scholarships For Kids In U.S. Illegally

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 10:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Don Graham is best known as the former owner of The Washington Post. His family ran the paper for 80 years until he sold it to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos last summer. Since then, Graham has been focusing on a long time passion, helping underprivileged students pay for college.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

A few years ago, Graham identified one group in particular that needs help with tuition, students who are brought to the U.S. by their parents illegally, undocumented immigrants. They do not have access to federal assistance.

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Barbershop
11:30 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Should The NFL Police The N-Word?

The National Football League is considering a 15-yard penalty for players using the N-word on the field. The Barbershop guys weigh in on that and other news of week.

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