Health

The Salt
7:32 am
Sun May 17, 2015

Assault On Salt: Uruguay Bans Shakers In Restaurants And Schools

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 1:51 pm

A typical Uruguayan asado, or barbecue, is made up of vast racks of prime cuts of beef, pork or chicken roasted on a grill next to — not on top of — a wood burning fire.

At parilla restaurants across the capitol Montevideo, the asados are pretty epic; the fatty cuts sizzle and then get slapped onto your plate, oozing with juice.

But if you want to grab a salt shaker and add a bit of extra salt to your meal these days in the Uruguayan capital, you can't.

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Shots - Health News
6:18 am
Sun May 17, 2015

Sex Ed Works Better When It Addresses Power In Relationships

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 7:25 pm

At schools that offer comprehensive sex education, students tend to get the biology and the basics — they'll learn about sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy, how to put a condom on a banana and the like.

But some public health researchers and educators are saying that's not enough. They're making the case that sex ed should include discussion about relationships, gender and power dynamics.

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Goats and Soda
5:06 am
Sun May 17, 2015

Who Did This To Peru's Jungle?

This aerial view shows the effects of gold mining on Peru's rain forest.
Courtesy of Gregory Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 2:52 pm

Gold has been a blessing and a curse for Peru for centuries. In the 16th century, one of the first Spanish explorers to arrive, Francisco Pizarro, was so enthralled by the mineral riches that he took the Inca king hostage.

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Sat May 16, 2015

What If Americans Ate Like South Africans And Vice Versa?

What would happen if Americans and South Africans switch diets for a week? Hint: It doesn't turn out that well for the South Africans.
Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 16, 2015 10:43 am

They switched diets.

Twenty South Africans gave up their corn porridge and vegetable stews for burgers and fries.

And 20 Pittsburghians sacrificed fast food staples for the low-fat, high-fiber fare that South Africans traditionally eat.

Dr. Stephen O'Keefe, a professor of nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, was eager to find out what would happen next.

O'Keefe knew that South Africans tend to have much lower rates of colon cancer than Americans. And he wanted to find out if food might be a factor.

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Health
4:19 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

Baltimore Health Commissioner: 'Public Health Is Tied To Everything'

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 5:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
3:31 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

What Should Liberia Do With Its Empty Ebola Treatment Units?

A boot-drying rack sits empty at the Ministry of Defense Ebola Treatment Unit in Monrovia.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 5:58 pm

The plastic orange mesh fences that once separated Ebola patients in the "red zone" from visitors in the "green zone" have collapsed. Corrugated metal roofing sheets flap in the wind. Some of the tents that served as isolation wards are still in good shape, but many of the tarps used as partitions are torn and frayed.

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Shots - Health News
9:33 am
Fri May 15, 2015

Feds Tell Insurers To Pay For Anesthesia During Screening Colonoscopies

The administration told insurers that they have to pay for anesthesia during screening colonoscopies for cancer.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 4:14 pm

Earlier this week the federal government clarified that insurers can't charge people for anesthesia administered during a free colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer.

That's welcome news for consumers, some of whom have been charged hundreds of dollars for anesthesia after undergoing what they thought would be a free test. But the government guidance leaves important questions unanswered.

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Goats and Soda
4:04 am
Fri May 15, 2015

It's Like The Story Of Job: Ebola Survivors Who Continue To Suffer

Moses Lasana recovered from Ebola, but he faces a range of medical issues and waves of pain. "The pain just come from one part of the body to another," he says.
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 11:13 am

His mother named him Moses, but the story of Moses Lasana over the past year unfolds more like the story of Job: Adversity follows tragedy only to be topped off with pain.

Last summer, Moses Lasana's girlfriend, who was nine months pregnant with his child, got Ebola and died. He has two sons; one of them also got sick and died. Then he came down with the disease.

In September, Moses Lasana was cured of Ebola. That should have been good news for the 30-year-old Liberian. But his suffering continues.

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Goats and Soda
4:04 am
Fri May 15, 2015

What It Takes To Lift Families Out Of Poverty

More than 1 million people in Peru earn less than the equivalent of about $450 each year.
Courtesy of Michael Rizzo/CGAP

Originally published on Sat May 16, 2015 6:50 pm

Eighteen years ago, Dean Karlan was a fresh, bright-eyed graduate student in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He wanted to answer what seemed like a simple question:

"Does global aid work?" Karlan says.

He was reading a bunch of studies on the topic. But none of them actually answered the question. "We were tearing our hair out reading these papers because it was frustrating," he says. "[We] never really felt like the papers were really satisfactory."

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The Salt
5:58 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

From Scornin' It To Lovin' It: McDonald's Tests Out Kale On Its Menu

Kale is not only loaded with nutrients, but it's become a emblem of a healthy lifestyle that's increasingly appealing to Americans ready to move away from processed, high-calorie food.
Peet Sneekes/Flickr

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 5:31 pm

Just a few months ago McDonald's was showing no love for kale.

In a TV ad promoting the beefiness of the Big Mac, the chain poked fun at the leafy green and other vegetarian fare: "You can't get juiciness like this from soy or quinoa," a low voice quips as the camera focuses on a juicy burger. "Nor will it ever be kale."

But the chain is now showing it some affection. McDonald's has announced that it's testing a new breakfast bowl that blends kale and spinach with turkey sausage and egg whites. McDonald's spokeswoman Lisa McComb says the bowls are "freshly prepared."

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