Health

The Salt
3:16 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Let Them Eat Sandwiches: USDA Eases School Lunch Restrictions

After the the school lunch program was overhauled in 2012 to curb childhood obesity, lots of kids began complaining that lunches were too skimpy.

Why? Because in some cases, schools had to limit healthy foods — such as sandwiches served on whole-grain bread or salads topped with grilled chicken — due to restrictions the U.S. Department of Agriculture set on the amount of grains and protein that could be served at meal-time.

In some districts, program participation dropped as more kids decided to brown-bag it and bring their own food to school.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:52 am
Fri January 3, 2014

5 Things That Could Alter The Perception Of Obamacare

Maria Webster joins others protesting Texas Gov. Rick Perry's stance against the Affordable Care Act in early 2013.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:06 am

Nearly four years after President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act, most of its major provisions are now in effect. And they appear to be as controversial as ever.

To help make sense of the partisan arguments, here are five things that are likely to be important measuring sticks of the law in 2014 and beyond.

1. How many people sign up for coverage in the insurance marketplaces and how many of them are in good health.

Read more
Health Care
10:03 am
Fri January 3, 2014

New Year, New Health Care Plans ... Can Doctors Keep Up?

Thousands of Americans rang in 2014 with new insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. But will doctors and hospitals start feeling the crunch? Host Michel Martin speaks with Washington Post health reporter Sarah Kliff.

TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Can One Girl Challenge The Traditions Of Her Village?

"It doesn't matter, your background. What matters is what you take from the opportunity you're given, where you go with that." — Kakenya Ntaiya
Ray Ortega TED

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 1:48 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Overcoming.

About Kakenya Ntaiya's TEDTalk

Kakenya Ntaiya tells the fearless story of challenging ingrained traditions, insisting on continuing school, and becoming the first girl to leave her Maasai village for college.

About Kakenya Ntaiya

Read more
Shots - Health News
7:43 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Why Ending Malaria May Be More About Backhoes Than Bed Nets

Yonta, 6, rests with her brother Leakhena, 4 months, under a mosquito bed net in the Pailin province of Cambodia, where deaths from malaria have decreased sharply in the past two decades.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:16 am

Wiping out malaria is a top goal for many leaders in global health.

Fewer people are dying now from the mosquito-borne disease than at any other time in history. "And there's a very, very strong belief now that malaria can be eliminated," says Joy Phumaphi, who chairs the African Leaders Malaria Alliance.

But when you look at the overall numbers on malaria, eradication almost seems like a pipe dream.

Read more
Shots - Health News
7:15 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Overweight People In Developing World Outnumber Those In Rich Countries

Government workers exercise at their office in Mexico City, August 2013. To counter the obesity epidemic, the city requires all government employees to do at least 20 minutes of exercise each day.
Tomas Bravo Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:06 am

People are getting fatter around the world. And the problem is growing most rapidly in developing countries, researchers reported Friday.

"Over the last 30 years, the number of people who are overweight and obese in the developing world has tripled," says Steve Wiggins, of the Overseas Development Institute in London.

Read more
NPR Story
3:39 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Want To Make Your Life Better? Keep Track Of It

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:51 am

The Quantified Self movement promotes something called life logging. That means tracking all kinds of details of your life in order to improve it. To find out more about the topic, David Greene talks to two people involved with life logging: Kitty Ireland, who works for a life logging app called Saga, and to David Goldstein, who turned to life logging with the help of a coach.

Shots - Health News
6:50 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Medicaid Expansion Boosted Emergency Room Visits In Oregon

Does having health insurance make it less likely that people will come to the ER? No, says a study in Oregon.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:51 am

Giving poor people health insurance, the belief was, would decrease their dependence on hospital emergency rooms by providing them access to more appropriate, lower-cost primary care.

But a study published in the journal Science on Thursday finds that's not the case. When you give people Medicaid, it seems they use both more primary care and more emergency room services.

Read more
Global Health
5:18 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Moved By Emotion: This Story Changed A Photographer's Lens

When Ajayibe was 22, she tried to kill herself after being shunned by her family. Surgery could not repair the hole in her birth canal, but her story helped inspire an American photographer to start a project to benefit women with fistula. Proceeds from the project have enabled Ajayibe to have livestock of her own.
Kristie McLean

In 2010, well-traveled freelance photographer Kristie McLean arrived in Ethiopia, her first trip to the country. She was there to photograph women with an injury that can happen when a baby gets stuck during childbirth: obstetric fistula. It's a condition common in rural Africa and Asia, where women give birth far from hospitals and C-sections aren't readily available.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:27 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Obamacare Brings Medicaid To Skid Row's 'Ugly Reality'

Martha Castro lives on the streets in Los Angeles' Skid Row neighborhood. She's still resistant to the idea that she can now get health coverage because of California's expansion of Medicaid.
Anna Gorman Kaiser Health News

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 7:47 pm

If you were led blindfolded a few blocks east from Los Angeles' grand City Hall, you would know instantly when you entered Skid Row.

There is the pungent smell of urine and marijuana smoke, and the sound of music and easy laughter — a carnival rising out of misery.

This is the chaos that Chris Mack plunges into on most days. Once homeless himself, Mack is an outreach worker for the JWCH Institute's Center for Community Health, a free clinic in the heart of Skid Row.

Read more

Pages