Health

Shots - Health News
2:31 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Measles Outbreak In Ohio Leads Amish To Reconsider Vaccines

Amish show up at a makeshift clinic to get vaccinated against the measles. There's been an outbreak of measles among the Amish in central Ohio.
Sarah Jane Tribble Sarah Jane Tribble

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:53 am

The Amish countryside in central Ohio looks as it has for a hundred years. There are picturesque pastures with cows and sheep, and big red barns dot the landscape.

But something changed here, when, on an April afternoon, an Amish woman walked to a communal call box. She picked up the phone to call the Knox County Health Department. She told a county worker she and a family next door had the measles.

That call spurred nurse Jacqueline Fletcher into action.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

As Heart Attacks Rise In China, So Does Attention To Quality Of Care

Patients who had suffered heart attacks rest while being observed in the emergency room of a heart hospital in Beijing in 2011.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:28 pm

Over the past several years, I've had the opportunity to be involved in a remarkable project in China. With the publication of a paper in The Lancet today that details the nation's performance in the care of patients with severe heart attacks, a pivot to include quality in addition to access to care in their health care reform has begun.

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Shots - Health News
4:02 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Pharmaceutical Companies Accuse Hospitals Of Misusing Discounts

David Chance recuperates at Oregon Health and Science University.
Kristian Foden-Vencil Oregon Public Broadcasting

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:07 pm

In 1992, the federal government told drugmakers they had to give steep discounts to hospitals that treat a large percentage of poor patients.

The law got bipartisan support and it was a boon for hospitals and the federal government. In the decades that followed, the discount program has grown by leaps and bounds.

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The Salt
3:40 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Simple Tricks Can Tame The Taste Of Broccoli And Its Cousins

The Romanesco broccoli in the upper left corner is part of the brassica family, just like these colorful cauliflower varieties.
Sang An/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:30 pm

It can be a bitter pill to swallow when science proves your mother was right. And that seems to be happening again and again when it comes to brassica. Even if you're not familiar with the term, you've undoubtedly swallowed the concept. Brassica is the genus of cruciferous vegetables, covering everything from broccoli to kale to cabbage. And the more we put them under the microscope, the more we find that they really are good for you.

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Shots - Health News
3:32 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

After The Fall, A Young Man Chronicles His Life With Multiple Sclerosis

Jason DaSilva was on a family vacation in 2006 when he fell and couldn't get up. His multiple sclerosis symptoms have progressed to the point that he can't walk.
Factory Release

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:29 pm

At age 25, Jason DaSilva had everything — he was smart, talented, good-looking and traveling the world as a documentary filmmaker. Then he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

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Shots - Health News
3:17 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Parents Get Some Help In Teaching Their Teens To Drive

No, your other right! Most parents would probably welcome some help when it comes to teaching teenage drivers.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:28 pm

Parents often take the lead in teaching their teenage children to drive, even though their own memories of starting out behind the wheel may be hazy at best.

And since car crashes are the top cause of teen deaths in the United States. claiming more than 2,700 teen lives in 2010 and sending another 282,000 to the emergency room, it's a task that parents really need to get right.

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Health
3:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Are Life Spans Getting Longer? It Depends On How Wealthy You Are

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:07 pm

While life expectancies are getting longer for those who are well off, life spans for poor women are actually getting shorter. The stories of two women, from two very different places, illustrate the reasons for the gap.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Technology
3:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

3-D Printing Lends Doctors A Hand, Building Tailor-Made Body Parts

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

That's the sound of another 3-D technology, that's increasingly being used in medicine, 3-D printing. Doctors are now using 3-D printers to make replacement body parts, among other things. The printer we're hearing is at the Food and Drug Administration offices, outside Washington D.C. This is an area they are starting to regulate. So NPR's Rob Stein went and got a little tour of the FDA lab.

ROB STEIN, BYLINE: Is that white, plastic thing, below the nozzle there - is that what's being made?

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All Tech Considered
2:58 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Using A 3-D Version Of Rodin's Hands To Understand Anatomy

Rodin's Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre, during the scanning process (from left); computer image created from the scan; inner anatomy; and exterior scan and inner anatomy combined for an augmented reality view of the sculpture.
Photo by Matthew Hasel, render by Sarah Hegmann, Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford School of Medicine

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:07 pm

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The Salt
12:46 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

School Nutrition Fight Widens As School Board Members Join In

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:18 pm

The political food fight over rolling back school nutrition standards is at an impasse for the moment. But advocates on both sides aren't backing off, and there are new players in the game.

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