Health

Indian Times
8:27 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Citizen Potawatomi Nation To Host Intergenerational Breast Cancer Awareness Day

Cara Thomas (left) and Dr. Eleni Tolma
Credit Susan Shannon

Native American women are the most likely to put off getting a mammogram, according to research by Dr. Eleni Tolma, associate professor at the college of public health at the OU Health Sciences Center.

“When I came to Oklahoma back in 2002, I wanted to find out what I could do in terms of breast cancer, I was always interested in women's health issues,” Tolma, who is also the lead researcher for the Native Women Health Project, said.

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NPR Story
3:08 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Military Training Gives U.S. Paralympic Biathletes An Edge

Andy Soule, a U.S. Army veteran, lost both his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan in 2005. Four years ago, he won America's first medal — Olympic or Paralympic — in the biathlon event.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 6:39 pm

Biathlon may be the toughest endurance sport in the Olympics. After grueling circuits of Nordic skiing, athletes have to calm their breathing, steady their tired legs and shoot tiny targets with a rifle.

Andy Soule does it all with only his arms.

"It's a steep learning curve, learning to sit-ski," says Soule, a member of the U.S. Paralympic team. He's strapped into a seat attached to two fixed cross-country skis. He speeds along the course by hauling himself with ski poles.

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Shots - Health News
11:05 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Seeking Solutions For Sexual Aggression Against Women In Bars

What is it about bars that brings out bad behavior?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 1:20 pm

Our post on sexual harassment in bars sure struck a nerve.

Earlier this week we covered a study from the University of Toronto that found that men who were sexually aggressive in bars weren't necessarily drunk, and that their actions usually weren't the result of miscommunication.

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Shots - Health News
10:34 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Actuaries In Denver Will Get First Peek At Obamacare's Full Cost

Health insurers are banding together to share information about how much new customers are costing health plans. A group of actuaries in Denver will be the first to see the figures, which could be used in calculating future rates.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 10:44 am

Now that medical insurers must accept all applicants no matter how sick, what will these new customers cost health plans? And how will their coverage costs affect insurance prices for 2015 and beyond?

Few questions about the Affordable Care Act are more important. How it all plays out will affect consumer pocketbooks, insurance company profits and perhaps the political fortunes of those backing the health law.

A few Denver actuaries, bound to confidentiality, will be the first to glimpse the answers.

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TED Radio Hour
8:16 am
Fri March 7, 2014

How Can We All Listen Better?

Julian Treasure speaking at TED.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Extrasensory.

About Julian Treasure's TEDTalk

Sound expert Julian Treasure says we are losing our listening in a louder world. He shares ways to re-tune our ears for conscious listening — to other people and the world around us.

About Julian Treasure

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TED Radio Hour
8:16 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Can A Prosthetic Limb Feel?

Todd Kuiken speaking at TED.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Extrasensory.

About Todd Kuiken's TEDTalk

Physiatrist and engineer Todd Kuiken is building a prosthetic arm that connects with the human nervous system — improving motion, control and even feeling.

About Todd Kuiken

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TED Radio Hour
8:16 am
Fri March 7, 2014

How Do You Construct A Voice?

Rupal Patel speaking at TED Women.
Marla Aufmuth TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Extrasensory.

About Rupal Patel's TEDTalk

Speech scientist Rupal Patel creates customized synthetic voices that enable people who can't speak to communicate in a unique voice that embodies their personality.

About Rupal Patel

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The Edge
2:15 am
Fri March 7, 2014

From War In The Desert To 'Murder Ball On Ice'

Former Marine Josh Sweeney lost both of his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan in 2009. He's competing with the U.S. Men's Sled Hockey team at the Paralympics in Sochi.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:18 am

It might not exactly be doctor's orders, but it made perfect sense to Josh Sweeney.

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Shots - Health News
7:17 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Second Baby Cleared Of HIV. Rare Event, Or Hope For Others?

While not conclusive, the two cases are "quite promising," says Anthony Fauci, a longtime AIDS researcher who directs the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:01 am

In only the second documented case of its kind, an infant born with the AIDS virus may have been cured of the infection, thanks to an intensive drug treatment begun just hours after her birth. The baby girl — now 9 months old — from Long Beach, Calif., is still on that regimen of antiretroviral drugs. But researchers who described her case at an AIDS meeting in Boston this week say advanced testing suggests that she is HIV-negative.

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Science
3:16 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Almost 500 Foods Contain The 'Yoga Mat' Compound. Should We Care?

Going, going, gone. You won't find azodicarbonamide in Nature's Own products. And Subway is phasing it out, too. But lots of manufacturers are still using the additive.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:55 am

That compound found in commercially baked bread — yep, the one that's in yoga mats, too — is in the news again.

A report from the Environmental Working Group finds that the compound, azodicarbonamide, is found in close to 500 food products, from Pillsbury Dinner Rolls to Little Debbie products to Wonder Bread.

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