Health

The Impact of War
3:20 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

To Treat PTSD, Veterans Have A Vast Array Of Ineffective Solutions

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 6:08 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A new study raises questions about the effectiveness of mental health care for veterans. Researchers found that neither the VA nor the Pentagon tracks the success of treatment for PTSD. The Pentagon sponsored this study, which was conducted by the Institute of Medicine. The results follow the scandal over waiting times at VA hospitals and they add a new layer to concerns about veterans' health care. Here's NPR's Quil Lawrence.

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Shots - Health News
2:13 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

West Africa Is 'Overwhelmed' By Ebola

A UNICEF field worker talks to villagers in Liberia's Foya District about how to prevent Ebola disease.
Ahmed Jallanzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:40 am

People are hiding from health care workers. New cases are turning up in unexpected places. At funerals, family members don't always follow the advice not to touch the body of the deceased, which may still harbor the deadly virus.

These are a few of the signs that, in the words of public health specialist Armand Sprecher of Doctors Without Borders, the Ebola outbreak that began in West Africa in February is "not under control yet."

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Shots - Health News
11:39 am
Fri June 20, 2014

Former Foster Care Youth Get Help Paying For Health Care

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:59 am

When Joseph Hill turned 21, he went from being homeless to being homeless and uninsured.

Hill grew up in foster care. He entered the system when he was 3 months old, and lived in 10 different foster homes in San Diego. At 19, he aged out of foster care and faced an abrupt transition into adulthood.

At first he received health insurance under Medi-Cal, California's version of Medicaid. But those benefits disappeared when he turned 21.

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Sports
11:00 am
Fri June 20, 2014

A Dangerous 'Ritual': Chewing Tobacco In Baseball

Baseball Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn's death has revived conversations about the use of smokeless tobacco in the sport. Tobacco and baseball researcher Ted Eaves discusses why so many players use it.

Health
9:24 am
Fri June 20, 2014

First Oklahoma Case Of Chikungunya Virus Confirmed

Credit dr_relling / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Department of Health says a Tulsa County resident has tested positive for the chikungunya virus, the first confirmed case of the disease in the state.

Chikungunya is not indigenous to Oklahoma or the continental U.S. The Oklahoman resident who tested positive for the virus recently traveled to Haiti on a mission trip.

The disease is transmitted by mosquitoes. The Health Department urges those considering traveling to any Caribbean island, South America, Africa or southeast Asia take extra precautions against mosquito bites.

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Shots - Health News
8:14 am
Fri June 20, 2014

Sanctions Common Against Doctors With Odd Medicare Billing

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 9:37 am

Over the past couple of months, media organizations including ProPublica have been busy dissecting data released by Medicare on payments made to health professionals in 2012.

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StoryCorps
2:39 am
Fri June 20, 2014

Inheriting A Rare Skin Condition, And The Ability To Laugh About It

On a visit to StoryCorps, Cheri Lindsay, 25, and Phillip Lindsay, 52, discussed a rare skin condition they share, and how they both have coped.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:03 am

People with vitiligo gradually lose pigment in their skin, often in patches that appear randomly and grow over time.

But that wasn't the case for Cheri Lindsay. The white pigment on her skin spread rapidly across her body and around her eyes, "like a mask," over the past four years, she says.

She imagines that she's dealt with it better than most, in part because of the example set by her father.

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The Two-Way
7:14 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

CDC Says Dozens Of Workers Could Have Been Exposed To Anthrax

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta says that as many as 75 of its workers may have been accidentally exposed to live anthrax bacteria this month because of a safety problem at one of its labs.

Member station WABE's Michell Eloy reports from Atlanta that the CDC says the possible exposure "occurred after researchers at a high-security lab failed to follow the correct procedure to deactivate the bacteria."

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Shots - Health News
2:19 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

To Defeat A Deadly Toxin, Disrupt Its Landing Gear

A high-resolution image of the molecular carrier that moves the botulinum toxin from the intestine into the bloodstream. The carrier (silver) creates gaps in the gut lining by grabbing the rope-like molecules (red ribbons) that tether one intestinal cell to the next.
Rongsheng Jin, UC Irvine, and Min Dong, Harvard Medical School

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:59 am

Botulinum toxin may be the most poisonous substance on the planet. A mere speck of the stuff can kill a person.

But just what makes the toxin so potent?

Part of the answer lies in the molecules that carry the toxin through the body. These carriers, which are produced along with the toxin by the Clostridium botulinum bacterium, protect the toxin as it travels through the hostile environment of the gastroinstetinal tract, and help it bust through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream.

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Shots - Health News
12:33 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Want Your Kids To Ace School? Good Motor Skills May Help

The cross country team may do more for your child's grades than the math tutor.
Robert Brown iStockphoto

There's no lack of evidence that children are getting fatter and weaker. And children who are obese or out of shape tend to do worse in school. But scientists are just starting to figure out just what it is in that mix that makes the difference with academics.

It looks like just being strong isn't the secret. Children and teens who did well on a hand-grip test and on a standing long jump did less well in school than peers who tested well on cardiovascular fitness and motor ability, according to a study of about 2,000 people in Spain. And motor ability mattered the most.

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