Health

Mental Health
4:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

When Cop Calls Involve The Mentally Ill, Training Is Key

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 5:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

While mental illness wasn't a known factor in the events in Las Vegas, it has been at the foreground in a spate of recent shootings. Police officers around the country are dealing with this issue more and more. About 25 years ago, one young officer had an experience that forever changed the way he thought about mental illness.

MICHAEL WOODY: A 27-year-old young woman, single mother of a 7-year-old child, tried to take my life.

RATH: That's Michael Woody. At the time, he was a sergeant for the Akron, Ohio police department.

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Shots - Health News
5:35 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cancer When You're Young Isn't Always 'The Fault In Our Stars'

In The Fault in Our Stars, Gus and Hazel, played by Ansel Elgort and Shailene Woodley, play two teenagers with cancer.
James Bridges AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 11:55 am

It's hard not to be charmed by Hazel and Gus, the flippant yet noble teenagers with cancer in the hit film The Fault in Our Stars. But movies have a bad habit of taking life-or-death health crises and turning them into cliché.

To find out if The Fault in Our Stars stayed true, we called on the experts – people who have had cancer as teenagers and young adults. Not surprisingly, most of them have read the book and seen the movie.

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Shots - Health News
2:01 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

6 Questions About Contraception Coverage And The Supreme Court

Customers enter a Hobby Lobby store on March 25, in Antioch, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:06 am

One of the most watched issues before the Supreme Court this term may turn on the question of religious freedom. But it will also likely determine how women will be able to access a key provision of the Affordable Care Act – one seeking to guarantee no-cost prescription contraception in most health insurance plans.

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The Salt
7:41 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Exercise And Protein May Help Good Gut Bacteria Get Their Groove On

Rugby and meat: a treat for the gut? A study suggests yes. Here Tony Woodcock (left) and Owen Franks of the All Blacks rugby team turn sausages on the barbecue in 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand.
Phil Walter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:46 am

Each month, it seems, we discover a new reason to appreciate the billions of bugs hanging out in our bellies. Why? They are far more influential than we ever thought.

As our colleague Rob Stein reported in his Guts and Glory series, the bacteria in our gastrointestinal tracts and on our skin may be doing everything from guiding the workings of our minds to helping us either fend off or become more predisposed to certain diseases.

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Shots - Health News
5:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Head Injury Risk Rose In Cities After Bike-Sharing Rolled Out

John Rose NPR

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:20 am

Editors' Note: This post has been revised to clarify and correct reporting on the findings of the bike helmet study. The researchers looked at head injuries, not just brain injuries, so the descriptions have been changed to head injuries throughout. The lead researcher said in response to follow-up questions that the study was designed to look at the risk of head injuries as a proportion of all injuries related to bicycling, so the headline and descriptions of the work have been changed to reflect that distinction.

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Shots - Health News
1:11 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Cool Kids Lose, Though It May Take A Few Years

As Lindsay Lohan's character (far left) learned in the movie Mean Girls, popularity comes at a price.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Parents, teachers and cheesy after-school specials have long tried to convince kids that being cool and popular isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Now scientists are chiming in as well.

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Shots - Health News
12:14 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Teen Smoking Hits A 22-Year Low, But Other Tobacco Uses Rise

A teenager finishes her cigarette in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Cigarette smoking among U.S. high school students has dropped to the lowest level in 22 years, federal health officials reported Thursday.

The percentage of students who reported smoking a cigarette at least one day in the last 30 days fell to 15.7 percent in 2013, according to the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a large federal survey that has been tracking youth smoking since 1991.

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Shots - Health News
11:28 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Forget 10,000 Steps. For Happy Knees, 6,000 Will Do It

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Exercise is the easiest way to avoid or reduce the pain of knee arthritis, but most adults aren't getting enough. Six thousand steps a day will do it, researchers say, which is considerably less than the 10,000 steps a day often touted by wellness programs.

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Shots - Health News
10:09 am
Thu June 12, 2014

New Jersey Ambulance Companies Take Medicare For A Ride

Ambulances fill a parking lot at the DaVita Dialysis Center in Paterson, N.J., on May 31.
Andrew Renneisen Courtesy of ProPublica

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:04 am

To grasp Medicare's staggering bill for ambulance rides in New Jersey, just visit the busy parking lot of the DaVita St. Joseph's dialysis clinic in Paterson.

More than 20 ambulances were parked outside on a recent morning there. Emergency medical technicians wheeled patients in and out on stretchers. As soon as one ambulance departed, another took its place.

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Shots - Health News
2:08 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Health Care Can Be Key To A Better Life For Former Inmates

Juanita Alvarado (right), a community health worker at the Transitions Clinic in San Francisco, helps a patient.
courtesy of Transitions Clinic

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 8:41 am

A San Francisco law now permits the sheriff's department to enroll inmates in health insurance policies under the Affordable Care Act — policies designed to cover medical care after a prisoner's release. Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi believes that making sure people have health coverage when they leave jail will help keep them from committing another crime and coming back.

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