Health

Shots - Health News
2:36 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

VA Health Care's Chronic Ailments: Long Waits And Red Tape

Soldiers returning from the Pacific wave from the deck of the USS General Mitchell on Dec. 11, 1945. Much of the health care demand in the VA system is from veterans of earlier wars.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:40 pm

More than 2.5 million veterans served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and they qualify for health care and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. These recent vets have been putting in for more service-related conditions than previous generations, for everything from post-traumatic stress disorder and brain injury to the bad knees, bad backs and bad hearing that nearly every new vet seems to have.

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Shots - Health News
8:50 am
Wed June 4, 2014

For New College Grads, Finding Mental Health Care Can Be Tough

Finding a good therapist can take time, especially in a new city.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 3:41 pm

For many young people, college graduation marks the entry into what grown-ups call "the real world." But if you're a new graduate with a mental health condition, the transition can be especially challenging.

Many young people start managing their own health care for the first time when they graduate. And while finding and paying for a psychologist or psychiatrist can be difficult at any age, for young people who don't have steady jobs or stable paychecks, the task can be especially daunting. Perseverance and planning ahead help.

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Shots - Health News
6:42 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Can Civilian Health Care Help Fix The VA? Congress Weighs In

Sen. John McCain discussed the Veterans Choice Act at a news conference on Tuesday, with fellow Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 7:03 pm

Veterans across the country are still waiting too long for medical care, a situation that drove the resignation of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki last week.

Now Republicans and Democrats in Congress are competing to pass laws they think will fix the problem of medical wait times and other problems at the VA. The discussion over how to reform veterans' health care is starting to sound familiar.

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:03 am
Wed June 4, 2014

How Chocolate Might Save The Planet

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 11:11 am

When you unwrap it, break off a piece and stick it in your mouth, it doesn't remind you of the pyramids, a suspension bridge or a skyscraper; but chocolate, says materials scientist Mark Miodownik, "is one of our greatest engineering creations."

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The Salt
5:04 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Norovirus: Far More Likely To Come From Restaurant Than Cruise Ship

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 10:49 pm

If you follow the news on nasty, contagious norovirus, you might assume that the place you're most likely to get it is on a cruise ship. For one, there was that outbreak earlier this year when a group of passengers got sick with severe vomiting and diarrhea on a Royal Caribbean boat.

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Shots - Health News
4:28 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

A Cut That Won't Heal Transforms One Woman's View Of Obamacare

Tammy Boudreaux tries a tendon-stretching drill after surgery. Boudreaux was able to get much of her operation and rehabilitation covered by the insurance plan she bought via the Affordable Care Act.
Carrie Feibel

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 11:07 am

When we first met Tammy Boudreaux, a freelance social worker in Houston, last December, she was still weighing her health insurance options.

She told us she was overwhelmed and confused by the choices she was finding on HealthCare.gov. And the high deductibles of the Obamacare plans didn't seem like such a great deal. But when we checked back in with Boudreaux this month, we learned that a chance encounter with a bottle of hot sauce ultimately changed her mind.

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Shots - Health News
12:23 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

The Health Data Revolution Enters An Awkward Adolescence

Gimma a "D!" The Health Datapalooza crowd went wild for this selfie by Bryan Sivak, chief technology officer at Health and Human Services.
Bryan Sivak Twitter

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:11 pm

The crowd in a hotel ballroom in Washington, D.C., was rocking on Monday, the 2,000 people shrieking with excitement over federal health-care databases. That could only happen at Health Datapalooza, the annual summit for data geeks, doctors, researchers and patients who want to use data to transform health care — or at least make a buck.

Both of those goals are proving to demand a lot more than just coming up with a nifty API and getting the venture capitalists to buy in.

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The Salt
12:23 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Could A 6-Cent Tax Sour Us On Soda And Sugary Drinks?

A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates.
California Center for Public Health Advocacy

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 4:34 pm

These days, sugar may be the new tobacco.

With so many studies linking Americans' collective sweet tooth to diseases including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and obesity, there's a lot of talk about policies to nudge consumers to consume less sugar.

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Health
11:15 am
Tue June 3, 2014

'Wait To Worry' About Challenges

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 12:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN: As we've just heard, being fired or losing your job is something that a lot of people have had to worry about in recent years. But our next guest has some advice for those of us who tend to worry a lot about life's what-ifs. That advice is to wait. Columnist Steven Petrow recently wrote about his epiphany and learning how to wait to worry for The Washington Post. In the piece, he talked about how he decided to stop worrying about stuff that hadn't even happened yet. Steven Petrow is with us now. Welcome back. Thanks so much for joining us once again.

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Shots - Health News
10:17 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Despite Law, Rape Victims Sometimes Pay For Medical Services

The effects of a sexual assault can be long-lasting, but the medical bills aren't supposed to be.

Yet a study published recently finds that despite federal efforts to lift that burden from rape victims, a hodgepodge of state rules mean some victims may still be charged for medical services related to rape, including prevention and treatment of pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections.

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