Health

Politics
11:28 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Why 'No One is Running With The President In Missouri'

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 12:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Much of the East Coast is digging out from ice and snow including Washington, D.C. But members of Congress beat the bad weather out of town and are back in their districts for a two week recess, this after a vote to raise the debt ceiling - a vote that came unusual for these times without an ugly showdown.

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The Salt
10:29 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Sexually Transmitted Food Poisoning? A Fish Toxin Could Be To Blame

Beware of the big guys: Red snappers from tropical waters sometimes accumulate high levels of the toxin that causes ciguatera. Go for the smaller fish to avoid it.
Kamel Adjenef iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 3:33 pm

Twenty-five years ago, two pals went out for a seafood dinner while vacationing in the Bahamas. What could be better than some fresh grouper steaks and a night on the town without the wives?

Um, plenty.

A few hours after dinner, the men started having stomach pains and diarrhea. Their legs began to tingle and burn. And their sense of temperature went haywire: Ice felt hot while fire felt cool.

All the while, their wives were completely fine — until they had sex with their hubbies.

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TED Radio Hour
9:32 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Are We Happier When We Stay In The Moment?

Matt Killingsworth speaking at TEDxCambridge in 2011.
Justin Ide TEDxCambridge

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 4:16 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Simply Happy.

About Matt Killingsworth's TEDTalk

When are humans most happy? To answer this question, researcher Matt Killingsworth built an app, Track Your Happiness, that let people report their feelings in real time. Among the results: We're often happiest when we're lost in the moment.

About Matt Killingsworth

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Shots - Health News
9:11 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Working With A Therapist Can Help When Sleeping Pills Don't

About 10 percent of Americans have chronic insomnia.
iStockphoto

About 1 in 10 Americans has chronic insomnia, and many aren't finding relief from pills.

A form of treatment called cognitive behavioral therapy, which doesn't use drugs, works. But it can be hard to find. So proponents of the treatment are trying new ways to get the treatment to troubled nonsleepers.

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TED Radio Hour
9:09 am
Fri February 14, 2014

What Happens When We Slow Down?

Carl Honoré says we need to slow down if we want to enjoy life.
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 4:16 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Simply Happiness.

About Carl Honoré's TEDTalk

Journalist Carl Honoré believes our society's emphasis on speed erodes health, productivity and quality of life. But there's a backlash brewing, as everyday people start putting the brakes on their modern lives.

About Carl Honoré

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Heart Disease
9:06 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Oklahoma Program Seeks To Improve Heart Health

Cardiovascular disease is the top killer of Oklahomans.
Credit Lizzie279 / Flickr Creative Commons

A new public-private initiative is working to reduce heart attacks and stroke in a five-county area in southeastern Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Heartland Project combines public health personnel with physicians, nurses, pharmacists, hospitals and insurers to help patients reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke and live a longer, healthier life.

Counties participating in the initiative include Pittsburg, Pontotoc, Coal, Atoka and Latimer. The pilot project is funded through a grant from the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.

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Shots - Health News
8:37 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Doctors Court Controversy In Ad For Surgical Robot

This advertisement for the da Vinci surgical robot led former hospital executive Paul Levy to ask the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System about its role in marketing the high-tech device.
Paul Levy ProPublica

Flipping through The New York Times magazine a few Sundays ago, former hospital executive Paul Levy was taken aback by a full-page ad for the da Vinci surgical robot.

It wasn't that Levy hadn't seen advertising before for the robot, which is used for minimally invasive surgeries. It was that the ad prominently featured a dozen members of the surgery team at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System. "We believe in da Vinci surgery because our patients benefit," read the ad's headline.

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Shots - Health News
4:19 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Stopping Microbes Not Missiles: U.S. Plans For Next Global Threat

Hannah Rood, 3, receives an H1N1 vaccine at a clinic in San Pablo, California, during the 2009 swine flu epidemic.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 6:58 pm

Spot the next plague before it arrives. Predict the next swine flu outbreak before it makes headlines. Even detect a biological weapon before it's launched.

These are the goals of an ambitious initiative, launched Thursday, to build a worldwide surveillance system for infectious diseases.

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The Salt
1:22 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Why Some Olympians Load Up On Salad Instead Of Pasta

Peter Frenette of the United States jumps during training for the Men's Normal Hill Individual ahead of the start of the Sochi Games.
Lars Baron Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 10:53 am

When we imagine Olympic athletes at the table before the most important competition of their lives, we might picture a huge plate of pasta, with Gatorade to wash it down and a well-deserved ice cream sundae for dessert.

Turns out, they might be preparing with a salad, a glass of beet juice and some almonds.

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Health
12:32 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

11 More Flu Deaths In Oklahoma, Bringing Total To 44 This Season

Credit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District / Flickr Creative Commons

Eleven more people have died from the flu over the past week, bringing the total number of Oklahomans who have died to 44 since Sept. 29.

The Oklahoma State Department of Health posted its latest update on its website Thursday.

52 more people were hospitalized with the flu, bringing the total number to hospitalizations to 1,076 this season.

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