Health

Shots - Health News
7:50 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Beezin' May Be Bogus, But Other Dopey Teen Fads Can Bite Back

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 1:00 pm

Another month, another apocalyptic news report of some weird substance that kids are abusing in pursuit of a high.

The most recent example is "beezin'," which supposedly involves smearing Burt's Bee's lip balm on one's eyelids. The tingling allegedly heightens the sensation of being drunk or high, according to the Oklahoma Fox News affiliate that first declared this a "viral trend."

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Global Health
4:13 am
Tue May 20, 2014

3rd U.S. Case Raises More Questions About MERS Virus

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Federal health officials reported over the weekend that the virus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, had spread from one person to another for the first time in the U.S.

Politics
4:11 am
Tue May 20, 2014

How Big A Factor Will Obamacare Be In Midterm Elections?

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:39 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Voters are choosing congressional nominees in half a dozen state primaries today, from the Pacific Northwest to the Deep South. Those states also run the gamut in their experience with the Affordable Care Act.

Now that the first insurance sign-up period has ended, we thought we'd take this opportunity to explore how the law is playing politically, and gauge what effect Obamacare might have on the midterm elections in November.

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Shots - Health News
4:57 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Task Force Says Asking All Patients About Suicide Won't Cut Risk

Alexandra Thompson iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:26 pm

Suicide remains a leading cause of death in the United States, especially among teenagers and young adults. Anything that could reduce the toll would be good.

But asking everyone who goes to the doctor if he is considering suicide isn't the answer, according to a federal panel that evaluated the effectiveness of existing screening tools for suicide. They found there wasn't enough evidence to know whether screening the general public helps or hurts.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

E. Coli Fears Spark Recall Of 1.8 Million Pounds Of Beef

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:05 pm

Federal authorities say a recall has been issued for 1.8 million pounds of ground beef that was shipped for use in restaurants. Detroit company Wolverine Packing issued the recall Monday; the Department of Agriculture says the beef may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

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Shots - Health News
11:06 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Less Sleep For Little Kids Linked To More Belly Fat Later On

Research suggests that young children who don't get enough sleep are more likely to be obese by the time they hit age 7.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 9:46 am

Ask anyone who's dealt with a crabby toddler at the end of the day: Little kids need a lot of sleep. The National Sleep Foundation says that 1- to 3-year-olds, for example, generally need 12 to 14 hours of shut-eye a day.

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Global Health
5:44 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Mosquito-Borne Breaking Bone Disease Spreads In Haiti

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 9:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A mosquito-borne virus is spreading across the Caribbean. It's called Chikungunya. It's hardly ever fatal but it does hurt, causing severe joint pain. And public health officials expect the disease to eventually reach the U.S. Reporter Peter Granitz takes us to Haiti, the country with the most recent confirmed outbreak.

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Shots - Health News
2:24 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don't Try This At Home

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 8:34 am

It's the latest craze for people who want to improve their mental performance: zapping the brain with electricity to make it sharper and more focused. It's called "brain hacking," and some people are experimenting with it at home.

The idea's not completely crazy. Small jolts of electricity targeted at specific areas of the brain are used to treat diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's, typically with tiny devices that must be surgically implanted.

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On Aging
2:23 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'Silver Tsunami' And Other Terms That Can Irk The Over-65 Set

Senior? Elder? Old? People past retirement age have different opinions about what they prefer to be called --€” so it probably can't hurt to ask.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

About one-fifth of the U.S. population will be 65 or older by the year 2030. NPR's Ina Jaffe covers this population — and says it's often difficult to find the right words to describe it.

"I realized what a minefield this was after I'd been on the beat just a few months," she says. "I did a profile of this 71-year-old midwife. She's still up all night delivering babies, and the headline on our website — and reporters ... do not write the headlines ... described her as 'elderly.'

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Global Health
4:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

How MERS Made The Leap From Animals To Humans

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 5:28 pm

David Quammen writes about how diseases jump from animals to people. He explains recent outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Disease, or MERS, including three cases discovered in the U.S. this month.

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