Health

Shots - Health News
12:14 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Could A 'Barbie' Get Real? What A Healthy Fashion Doll Looks Like

Look familiar? Artist Nickolay Lamm designed a doll to look like the average 19-year-old walking — or running — on the street.
Courtesy of Lammily

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:35 pm

For decades, the Barbie doll has been slammed by parents for promoting an unhealthy female body image. Playing with a Barbie doll for just a few minutes may cause girls to limit their career ambitions, psychologists reported last month.

So why do we keep offering girls bone-thin dolls like Barbie and the popular Monster High crew, asks artist Nickolay Lamm?

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Shots - Health News
6:14 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again

Lt. Gen. Mark Milley speaks to reporters April 2 regarding the second shooting in five years on the Fort Hood Army post in Texas.
Drew Anthony Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:05 am

With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood.

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Rethinking Retirement: The Changing Work Landscape
5:27 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

Saving for retirement is a challenge facing most Americans. Research shows the challenge is made harder by our basic human impulses. We know we should be saving. But we don't. We consistently make bad financial decisions.

One thing that leads us astray is what behavioral economists call "loss aversion." In other words, we hate losing. And that gets in the way of us winning — if winning is making smart financial decisions.

How A Smashed Car Is Like A Smashed Nest Egg

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Shots - Health News
3:22 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Growing Evidence That A Party Drug Can Help Severe Depression

Clubgoers prize Special K's hallucinogenic experience, but scientists like it better as a depression treatment.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:41 pm

Teens call it "Special K," a club drug that produces hallucinatory, out-of-body effects. But evidence is mounting that it's also a fast-acting treatment for patients with severe depression.

The latest study shows that ketamine, an FDA-approved anesthetic, can act in a matter of days for some people who don't respond to traditional antidepressants. Those drugs don't work for 40 percent of patients.

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Mental Health
3:02 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

New Shooting Revives Old Questions About Mental Health In Military

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

The mass shooting at Fort Hood, the second at the same Army base in just five years, is renewing questions about the state of mental health treatment on U.S. military bases.

The Salt
2:46 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Time To Relax The Sodium Guidelines? Some Docs Say Not So Fast

Consuming anywhere from about 2,600 milligrams up to almost 5,000 milligrams of sodium per day is associated with more favorable health outcomes, according to a study.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 5:50 pm

We've all heard the advice to go easy on the salt shaker. Or, perhaps, more importantly, to cut back on eating packaged, processed foods that often contain a lot of salt.

And why? There's a lot of evidence linking excessive sodium intake to high blood pressure, which increases the risk of heart disease.

The dietary guidelines recommend that adults consume no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day.

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Shots - Health News
1:59 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

A Pill For Grass Allergies May Replace Shots For Some

Could this be the end of grass and gesundheit?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:47 pm

Later this spring, allergy sufferers will have access to a new form of help: a pill that can replace allergy shots. But the pill works only for grass allergies, and it's not clear how much it's going to cost.

The Food and Drug Administration just approved Oralair, the first sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for use in the United States. That's how regulators describe a pill that you stick under your tongue to tamp down your immune system.

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Health
10:52 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Cancer Disparity Among Black Women Unresolved

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we turn to one of those uncomfortable questions that many people, particularly in health, have asked themselves and know all too well.

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Shots - Health News
10:39 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Good Day Sunshine: Could Morning Light Help Keep Us Lean?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:46 pm

Exposure to morning light, whether it's pure sunlight or bright indoor lighting, is associated with leaner body weights, researchers say.

The findings fit with a growing body of evidence that suggests keeping our internal body clocks synchronized with the natural light-dark cycle is beneficial to our health and our waistlines.

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Shots - Health News
7:43 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Nearly Half Of Californians Who Used Exchange May Drop Coverage

Last-minute applicants for health insurance jam the Bay Area Rescue Mission in Richmond, Calif., on Monday.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:06 pm

An analysis of the people who signed up for health insurance on California's exchange found that they are likely to drop the coverage for a pretty good reason: They found insurance elsewhere.

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