Health

Shots - Health News
12:53 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

A Mother And Daughter Confront Their Breast Cancer Risk

Regina Brett
Courtesy of Regina Brett

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 7:07 am

Hollywood superstar Angelina Jolie has been in the headlines, by her own choice for a change.

Genetic testing showed she was at high risk for breast cancer, so she decided to have a double mastectomy to improve her odds. She revealed her choice, and the thinking behind it, in a recent op-ed in The New York Times.

Read more
Parenting
11:17 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Getting Rid Of My Breasts, A Lot Of People Didn't Understand

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 12:02 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

Today, though, we are talking about a difficult decision that both mothers and daughters face, sometimes together. It's the question of whether to get genetic testing for breast cancer and what to do when you find out that you are at high risk.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:55 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Less Sleep For Teens Means Higher Risk For Car Crashes

Sleep-deprived teenagers face the greatest risk of accidents while driving at night.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 7:06 am

Parents who want to keep their teenagers safe while they're driving might want to tuck them in bed early the night before.

Drowsiness is a well-known risk for adult drivers, but teenage drivers are more impaired than adults when facing an equivalent lack of sleep, an Australian study finds.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:01 am
Tue May 21, 2013

Texas Medicaid Debate Complicated By Politics And Poverty

Protesters march on the Texas Capitol in Austin on March 5, demanding that lawmakers expand Medicaid to include an additional 1.5 million poor people.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 7:08 am

When the sun rises over the Rio Grande Valley, the cries of the urracas — blackbirds — perched on the tops of palm trees swell to a noisy, unavoidable cacophony. That is also the strategy, it could be said, that local officials, health care providers and frustrated valley residents are trying to use to persuade Gov. Rick Perry and state Republican lawmakers to set aside their opposition and expand Medicaid, a key provision of the federal health law.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:28 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Latest Health Hurdle: Buying Insurance Without A Bank Account

Millions of people who rely on check-cashing stores, like this one in New York City, could run into trouble buying health insurance.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 4:43 pm

When movie stars become unbankable, they're no longer a slam dunk at the box office. When investments become unbankable, they're relegated to the Wall Street's junk pile. For ordinary Americans deemed unbankablethose who don't have a traditional checking or savings account — it can be hard to simply pay bills.

And that absence of a bank account is about to become a big problem for those who also lack health coverage — and for the health insurance companies trying to sell them coverage. After all, how do you sell a product to a customer who has no easy way to pay you?

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:42 am
Mon May 20, 2013

ADHD In Childhood May Feed Obesity In Adults

Does ADHD affect eating and weight?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 7:07 am

Men who were diagnosed with ADHD as children are more likely to be obese in adulthood, according to a new study.

The men who had ADHD weighed 19 pounds more at age 41 than otherwise similar men who hadn't had ADHD as boys, the researchers found.

Read more
The Salt
10:01 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Can A Piece of Hair Reveal How Much Coke Or Pepsi You Drink?

Carbon isotope analysis: a scientific way to know just how much soda kids are drinking behind parents' backs?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:00 am

One way to know how much soda people drink is to ask them.

The problem? We tend to underestimate, lie or forget what we've consumed.

And this is a challenge for researchers who study the links between sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:04 am
Mon May 20, 2013

If Your Shrink Is A Bot, How Do You Respond?

Ellie is a computer simulation designed to engage real people in meaningful conversation and take their measure. The computer system looks for subtle patterns in body language and vocal inflections that might be clues to underlying depression or other emotional distress.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 4:19 pm

Read more
Health
2:03 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Bans Of Same-Sex Marriage Can Take A Psychological Toll

Opponents of same-sex marriage participate in the March for Marriage in Washington, D.C., on March 26, as the Supreme Court hears arguments on California's Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 8:25 am

As the country awaits two important Supreme Court decisions involving state laws on same-sex marriage, a small but consistent body of research suggests that laws that ban gay marriage — or approve it — can affect the mental health of gay, lesbian and bisexual Americans.

Read more
Mental Health
4:27 pm
Sat May 18, 2013

Alzheimer's Cases Rise, But Hope Remains

Amy Goyer moved back to Phoenix to look after her father, Robert, when he began to show signs of Alzheimer's. He is just one of 5 million Americans living with the disease.
Sarah Brodzinski

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 6:47 pm

More than 5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer's disease, and the National Institute on Aging estimates that that number is going to triple by 2050 — in part due to aging baby boomers.

The cost of coping with the disease — currently estimated at $215 billion — is projected to rise to half a trillion dollars by 2050. That amount will likely tax our overburdened health care system, the economy and the families of those affected.

Amy Goyer realized her 84-year-old father Robert's health was deteriorating one night while watching a movie with him.

Read more

Pages