KGOU

This is KGOU

How we do what we do

This space includes commentary from the NPR Ombudsman, Elizabeth Jensen, the public's representative to NPR, serving as an independent source regarding NPR's programming.

Jeffrey Beall / Flickr Creative Commons

At 27, I’m one of the younger members of the KGOU staff. I started my career in public radio at KGOU at 19, while still very much a naïve college student. Working on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, sometimes it feels like I never left college.

Fortunately, if you never leave higher education, you never stop learning. Public radio stimulates my curiosity, and teaches me something new every single day. In this 21st Century fast-paced digital landscape, a conversation that once opened with “I heard it on KGOU…” has been replaced with a text message that usually starts with “TIL” (for “Today I Learned…”).

That thirst for knowledge is quenched every day by what I hear on KGOU. 

Tom Bullock

I have a great admiration of journalists. I think it’s a fascinating profession, but more importantly, I believe it is necessary and noble work.

The ability to understand a subject, look at it from all sides and present it in a way that makes sense to the reader, listener or viewer takes skill and knowledge. 

Journalism is a public service dedicated to accuracy and truth.  It is vital for a free society to have reporters asking questions, verifying information and presenting it to the public. 

Jim Johnson

As a junior attending the University of Oklahoma in 1991, “self” was very much my focus. I had time for little else, it seemed. After all, I was working hard to finance my way through school (and life) and wondering what my place in this world would be once I graduated when an opportunity to actually gain some experience in broadcasting came about.

Manish Rai Jain / Flickr Creative Commons

Yes, I'm really going to compare public radio to a suspension bridge. They're very similar, don't you think?

And not just in the obvious ways.

It's easy to see that like a suspension bridge, public radio is a connector between communities, a way to get from Here to There, a conduit for the free exchange between points -- geographic or intellectual -- that seemed forever destined to be separated.

I have a couple of young cats in my household and I keep waiting for them to grow older and become more sedate like the 8 year olds.  

My house is “cat-proofed” and still, I’ve had to replace lampshades and window blinds.  They are always looking for new things in their environment – rings from the milk bottle, a new box, a shopping bag and the moth hiding on the ceiling. 

But honestly, the myth of the curious cat is no myth.  And -- I like their antics, I think, because they mirror my own mind.

NPR's Rome-based senior European correspondent Sylvia Poggioli fielded topics ranging from Pope Francis and the Vatican and rising xenophobia in Europe to the one thing she wished more Americans knew about Europe and her favorite TV show (The Wire!) during her Reddit "Ask Me Anything" Thursday.


Highlights

On Pope Francis

The Patriotism Of NPR And Its Sponsor Al Jazeera America

Sep 17, 2013

Al Jazeera America, the new cable news network owned by the Emirate of Qatar, has been running sponsorship ads on NPR for the last month as part of its launch campaign.

Some listeners are upset, accusing NPR of being unpatriotic or naïve. Some add that it also has been unethical. Three NPR stories about the new English-language channel did not mention the sponsorship. Most of the complaints, recalling the coverage by Al Jazeera's Arabic network of American deaths early in the Iraq war, are obviously heartfelt.

Jeremy Gossett with Kini Kay at mixing board, overseeing recording session
Jeremy Gossett Productions

Following a “soft” launch in July, KGOU commits to full season of Backstage Jazz.

Hosted by resident jazz lover and independent producer Jeremy Gossett, Backstage Jazz is the culmination of Gossett’s three-year quest to create a radio program that showcases both regionally-admired and internationally recognized jazz artists. Gossett told the Oklahoma Gazette what he means by “Backstage”.

S. Dakota Indian Foster Care: Listening To Your Responses

Aug 15, 2013

Updated Aug. 30, 2013 at 5 p.m.

One of the things that struck me most about the many responses to my review of an investigative series on foster care for Native Americans in South Dakota is that the ombudsman process worked.

NPR's Scott Simon's mother passed away Monday evening, and the veteran host of "Weekend Edition Saturday" used Twitter to chronicle her final days with poignancy, grace, humor, and love.

Kainaz Amaria / NPR

Now that the busy-ness has abated somewhat from April's membership drive, May's disastrous storms, and June's end of the fiscal year (where did June go?), I've had some time to look over the correspondence we've received from listeners and members.

It's no surprise that the bulk of it was regarding the programming changes brought on by NPR's decision to discontinue Talk of the Nation. Many listeners were saddened, and possibly even angry, just like Kathy:

All this week, we are remembering our favorite moments from the 21-year-run of Talk of the Nation. With so many driveway moment-inducing interviews, hours of live breaking news, segments with familiar voices, and insights from audience members, it's hard to know where to start. So we asked a few of those who worked on Talk of the Nation over the years to share a story or two.

Provided / Radiolab

The hosts of WNYC and NPR’s Radiolab took to the social media outlet reddit Wednesday to answer questions from fans and listeners as part of the “AMA (Ask Me Anything)” interview series.

Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich addressed the controversy surrounding the September 2012 episode Yellow Rain. Andrew Lapin writes in the public media trade publication Current that the program revisited the use of chemical weapons against the Hmong people in the closing days of the Vietnam War.

Meredith Everitt

The theme of this episode of Assignment: Radio is “Firsts”. So, what better way to end it than with the first host of the show?

Assignment: Radio April 16, 2013

Apr 16, 2013
Brant Morrell

This week on Assignment: Radio, we focus on transcending the list of questions and prepared answers to engage in one-on-one, in-depth conversations with authors, artists, musicians, athletes, leaders and activists. 

Meredith Everitt and Lauren Abram
Laura Knoll / KGOU

If you're familiar with KGOU's student-produced public affairs program Assignment: Radio, then you already know we have some talented student broadcasters taking the university course known internally as Radio News.

But to banish any doubts, here's proof: In the National Broadcasting Society (Alpha Epsilon Rho) annual student competition, Assignment: Radio reporters won national awards for their work in 2012.

A One-Word Prompt

Laura Knoll / KGOU

On Jan. 1, 1983, KGOU became a non-commercial public radio station. I barely noticed.

I should have noticed. After all, I was working at KGOU as a volunteer student broadcaster, and for the past year and a half I’d been dragging my sleep-deprived self out of bed at 6 a.m. (an hour most college students deemed unthinkable)  to write and deliver two five-minute newscasts each morning. Still, I didn’t pay much attention.

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