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KGOU listener Keith Gaddie and his bulldog, Georgia.
Keith Gaddie

It’s Mardi Gras - a day of indulgence, parades, zydeco, and a celebration of all things New Orleans during annual Carnival celebrations that originate with the Christian period between Epiphany and Lent.

KGOU (and our listeners) celebrated the season Sunday afternoon with The Weekend Bluesannual “Mardi Party” featuring music from the Crescent City and beyond.

NPR listeners and readers woke up Tuesday morning to headlines declaring Hillary Clinton the winner of the previous night's Democratic caucuses. "Hillary Clinton has defeated Bernie Sanders by the slimmest of margins," the 7 a.m. ET newscast reported. Online, one headline read: "Iowa Caucuses: Cruz Wins GOP Race; Clinton Defeats Sanders."

NPR 'Jeopardy!' Fans - This One's For You

Jan 27, 2016

Last week, Jeopardy! viewers put their NPR knowledge to the test along with three contestant hopefuls-- Todd Coleman, a professor from River Falls, Wisconsin; Will Anderson, a senior legislative hailing from Atlanta, Georgia; and Maggie Schreiter, fiber artist and a stay-at-home mom from Ewing, New Jersey.

Think you can answer the NPR-infused trivia questions? Give us your best guess:

On Sunday morning Jan. 24, NPR's Goats and Soda blog published a piece with the title, "What Are You Afraid Of In 2016? Globetrotters Share Their Fears." The post was accompanied by an illustration, done by a freelance artist, which depicted some travelers' anxieties, from food-borne disease to access to quality health care.

Michael Oreskes joined NPR as its head of news at the end of April 2015. Since then, he has overseen extensive changes on air, as well as behind the scenes in the newsroom.

As listeners are hearing today on Morning Edition, longtime sports commentator Frank Deford, a Wednesday morning fixture on NPR for more than three decades, is going to appear less frequently on NPR in the future.

Deford, who has been delivering his Sweetness and Light commentary weekly since 1980 (except for a two-year hiatus in 1989–90), will now be heard on the first Wednesday of the month. Varied new commentators—there's no set roster—will fill the sports slot the other weeks.

The letter below calling for the release of Jason Rezaian was sent January 8, 2016.

Dear Secretary Kerry:

Journalism is not a crime. Yet Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian has been imprisoned by Iran since July 2014 for doing his job. Iran has never offered any evidence that even makes a pretense of justifying this imprisonment. We know you agree that Iran should release Jason and on behalf of our organizations and journalists around the world, we are writing to urge you to maintain your efforts to forge a path to that release.

Listeners often write about spoiler alerts—sometimes plot spoilers sneak through in reports on TV shows and movies, as careful as NPR's reporters and hosts try to be.

I've heard from many listeners in recent weeks about NPR's coverage of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Many of their messages can be boiled down to one word: "Enough."

David Mislin, of Pittsburgh, Penn., wrote:

It has become all too clear that Donald Trump is running a campaign based on bigotry and hate. And yet, NPR continues to afford his campaign considerable airtime (he was the lead story on Morning Edition today, for example).

Last week I looked at the third year results of NPR's ongoing examination of the gender, geographic, ethnic and racial diversity of its on-air sources — the people who are interviewed on the air, either as experts or participants in events or part of the general public.

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