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A line will be added to the NPR.org biography of South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro. It will read: "Lourdes is married to The Times of London journalist James Hider. They have a daughter and they sometimes travel together for work and always for play."

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET.

NPR has asked Latino USA to remove all NPR branding from last weekend's episode of the show, saying it "does not meet NPR's editorial standards." A tough penalty, to be sure, but in this case it's warranted; the show's execution simply did not meet the goals the producers had intended. NPR's statement follows, along with a response from Latino USA.

A note from NPR's editors:

One follow-up and some concerns about language to end this week.

First, the follow-up.

NPR has updated its code of ethics.

Bill Deputy was All Things Considered's guardian of sound. An engineer and the show's technical director for many years, Deputy died Sunday of lung cancer in New Orleans at the age of 58.

Sound was a serious business for Bill. When he wasn't combining words and sound with music in the All Things Considered control room, he was traveling with us on assignments. We worked together everywhere from Baltimore to Gaza City, and his assignments with my colleagues were equally far-flung.

On Wednesday, Morning Edition ran a story about advocates in Kentucky adopting a county-by-county strategy to pass right-to-work legislation, after statewide efforts to pass such legislation failed for several years running. The story was by Lisa Autry, an award-winning reporter at member station WKU Public Radio, in Bowling Green, Ky., who occasionally contributes to NPR's newsmagazines.

If you had one million dollars to fulfill a wish to change the world, what would you do? This is the question the winner of the annual TED Prize is asked to answer.

Last week, All Things Considered aired a piece by NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reporting on investigations into the work of so-called "climate skeptics" — scientists who doubt that climate change is a serious problem or that humans are causing it. The piece raised the broader issue of whether advocates on both sides of the climate change debate are trying to undermine scientists with whom they disagree.

Back in 2012, the Ombudsman's web page posted a document titled NPR Underwriting Credit Guidelines. It was the first document that came up in a Google search on the topic of the policies, adopted by NPR's board of directors, that govern how NPR gives on-air recognition to its underwriters, including commercial entities and non-profit organizations that want to draw attention to their goods, services and viewpoints.

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