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All Things Considered, NPR's flagship evening news program, is expanding its lineup of hosts: Ari Shapiro and Kelly McEvers will join veterans Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish on weekdays, and Michel Martin will become the new host of the weekend show.

Over the weekend, the left-of-center "media watch group" known as FAIR, for Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, sent out an "Action Alert" with the headline "NPR Celebrates Fast-Track Victory With an All-Corporate Lobbyist Segment." The alert generated a number of emails to my office (many from people who clearly had not listened to or read the report in question.)

After more than 12 years anchoring All Things Considered, senior host Melissa Block is moving into an expanded role with NPR News. As Special Correspondent, Melissa will produce richly reported profiles of figures at the forefront of thought and culture, as well as long-form stories and series on the critical issues of our day. Her reporting will span both domestic and international news. In addition, Melissa will guest host NPR news programs, and will work to develop podcasts based on her reporting. Melissa's last day hosting ATC will be August 14, 2015.

This week, NPR reported that the Department of Veterans Affairs failed to live up to a promise to contact 4,000 veterans who were exposed to mustard gas in secret military experiments. In 1993, the VA promised it would reach out to each of those veterans to let them know that they were eligible for disability benefits. Instead, over the past 20 years, the VA reached out to only 610.

Is the killing of nine people at a black church in Charleston, S.C. on Wednesday night "terrorism" and should NPR be calling it such?

You've been put on notice, Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

John Moore of Decatur, Ga., wrote to NPR: "Everyone is allowed one mulligan, and you just had yours."

Moore, who admits he might be an "NPR snob," was referring to the show's "Not My Job" guest appearance this past weekend of—gasp!!!—Kim Kardashian, where she was invited to promote her new book, Selfish, 448 pages of photographs of herself.

Another week, another Bernie Sanders column. And this time the issue is far more serious than repeatedly being called a "long shot."

The plaintive email came into my office Wednesday night from Joseph Suste of Medford, Ore. In total, it read: "Why isn't NPR covering the Bernie Sanders campaign?"

My even shorter answer? NPR is (although Suste has lots of company among listeners who believe the coverage is missing). But other listener questions need a fuller answer.

When award-winning journalists look back on their early forays in reporting, it's rare to hear that their j-school work helped get wrongfully-convicted men off of death row and led to a moratorium on capital punishment in the state where the inmates had been indicted. Laura Sullivan, a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team, did just that and has continued digging for truth and justice in the time since.

NPR's Associate Editor for News Operations, Jim Lesher, died this morning at the age of 46, after a swift and debilitating battle with stomach cancer. He is survived by his mother Anne Lesher, his father James Lesher Sr., his sister Kathryn Nash and two nephews, Christopher and Sean, along with his extended family at NPR.

For more than two decades, Lesher worked tirelessly behind the scenes coordinating logistics so that NPR not only was heard, but also sounded its very best. He was incredibly proud of his work, and he had good reason to be.

This post has been updated below.

NPR hosts, correspondents, producers and contributors write an awful lot of books, many of them eagerly anticipated by listeners who turn them into bestsellers. But I believe NPR should not routinely help their cause by featuring the books on air and online. NPR's new top news executive concurs, in part, particularly when it comes to show hosts discussing their own outside projects on their own shows.

KGOU's website is in transition today to a more mobile-friendly design, so that all the features available on KGOU.org can go with you wherever you go! This new "responsive" design optimizes the layout of each webpage according to the size of the viewer's screen.

The layout on a desktop or laptop computer has just a few changes -- the live audio stream is still accessible from the top of the screen, although now it's on the right side. The navigation bar underneath has just had a little facelift, and the news content flows underneath.

Weekend Edition Sunday aired a feature piece last week about the experience of Little Rock, Ark., cartographer Andrea Zekis as she transitioned from male to female. It focused on her experience at her workplace, the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department, and was told largely through the voices of Zekis and her coworkers as they recalled events from several years ago.

Listeners had lots of questions (and of course, opinions) in recent days. Here are some answers.

A Morning Edition report on Monday with the headline "Congress May Be Forced To Intervene Again On Mammogram Recommendations" drew some sharp rebukes, many of them from physicians who expressed deep concern over missing context.

As environmental activists seek increasingly to equate fossil fuel companies with demonized tobacco, and as the movement pushing pension funds and endowments to divest themselves of fossil fuel stocks gains momentum, NPR finds itself under renewed attack for its acceptance of corporate underwriting money from America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA), the trade and lobbying group for natural gas producers.

A line will be added to the NPR.org biography of South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro. It will read: "Lourdes is married to The Times of London journalist James Hider. They have a daughter and they sometimes travel together for work and always for play."

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET.

NPR has asked Latino USA to remove all NPR branding from last weekend's episode of the show, saying it "does not meet NPR's editorial standards." A tough penalty, to be sure, but in this case it's warranted; the show's execution simply did not meet the goals the producers had intended. NPR's statement follows, along with a response from Latino USA.

A note from NPR's editors:

One follow-up and some concerns about language to end this week.

First, the follow-up.

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