Politics and Government

Political news

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

After a video surfaced last week showing Donald Trump boasting in 2005 how he would kiss and grope women without consent, the GOP nominee insisted in Sunday's presidential debate that it was just "locker room talk" and, pressed repeatedly by CNN's Anderson Cooper, finally said that he had never actually taken the action he described.

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Liberty University is a place where Donald Trump still has a lot of support.

But his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, is the one who seems naturally at home at the Virginia college, in a way the flamboyant New York real estate developer is not.

Comic book fans are familiar with the idea of the multiverse: alternate worlds very similar to ours but different enough for plots to come and go without affecting long-term story arcs.

Well, on the Earth-3 where Hillary Clinton is running for president against a traditional, disciplined Republican – and not a Donald Trump, who has declared civil war on other Republican leaders – WikiLeaks' decision to post Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta's private emails would be a major, major news story right now.

Utah has been solidly Republican at the presidential level for the past 48 years. But the leaked tape of Donald Trump bragging about groping and kissing women without their consent may have been the last straw for socially conservative voters in this heavily Mormon state.

Soon after the tape surfaced, several prominent Republicans in the state revoked their support for the GOP presidential nominee.

Gov. Gary Herbert did so on Twitter within a few hours.

As part of an election-year project called A Nation Engaged, NPR has been asking people this presidential election year what it means to be an American.

The country is changing — it's getting browner, as population growth slows among whites. Non-whites now make up a majority of kindergartners; by the next presidential election, the Census Bureau predicts they will be a majority of all children; and by 2044, no one racial group will be a majority of the country.

Workers continue road-widening construction along S. Choctaw Road south of SE 59th Street in Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Next year Oklahoma City will ask to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars for routine expenses like bridges, drainage, parks and streets as part of a 10-year renewal of the city's general obligation bond.

Residents now have a chance to tell city leaders how much to borrow and where the money should go. Oklahoma City officials have released a survey asking people what they think of infrastructure repairs and improvements.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush once described Asian-Americans as the "canary in the coal mine" of the Republican Party, saying that if Republicans didn't make more of an effort to court the fastest-growing racial group in the United States, the party would pay a price at the polls.

Now a new report from the National Asian American Survey finds not only that Asian-Americans continue a steady drift away from the GOP, but that the party may be losing one of its most reliable ethnic groups.