Science and Technology

Interviews
6:49 am
Sat May 24, 2014

'TED Radio Hour': What We Fear And How To Fight It

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

What are you afraid of? The TED Radio Hour is asking that question this week. Guy Raz spoke to retired astronaut Chris Hadfield, who commanded the International Space Station, about the scariest day of his life.

GUY RAZ, BYLINE: Can you describe the day of a launch? Like, what happens on that day?

CHRIS HADFIELD: It's like a - that feeling in a roller coaster, I think, where you get into that little chunka, chunka, chunka chain thing that drags you up the hill to make the ride begin.

RAZ: Right.

Read more
Photography And Memory
5:04 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

How To Stay Afloat In Your Infinite Stream Of Photos

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by our ability to create an infinite stream of images. But if you take the time to stop and be mindful before you click, your photo collection will become much more manageable.
Kainaz Amaria Instagram

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:22 pm

On average, I make about 1,000 images each month on my iPhone. That's about 33.33333333333 (you get the idea) images a day. And that's just in an average month; if I'm on vacation or on assignment, that number might double or even triple.

It may sound extreme, but I wouldn't have it any other way. Photography is the language I am most comfortable speaking. Why bother describing a moment, when I can capture that feeling and share it instantly?

Read more
The Two-Way
4:42 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Greg Asked For A Holiday. The Internet Helped Him Get It

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:41 pm

It started out as a simple vacation request to the boss. It quickly became an Internet phenomenon.

And, now there's even a T-shirt.

Greg Heaslip, who works as a security guard at U.K.-based fashion retail group Arcadia, emailed his manager asking for some time off.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Organic Cat Litter Chief Suspect In Nuclear Waste Accident

Workers at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant are still investigating what caused a radioactive release at the site, but organic cat litter may be the culprit.
DOE/WIPP

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 2:12 am

In February, a 55-gallon drum of radioactive waste burst open inside America's only nuclear dump, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico.

Now investigators believe the cause may have been a pet store purchase gone bad.

"It was the wrong kitty litter," says James Conca, a geochemist in Richland, Wash., who has spent decades in the nuclear waste business.

Read more
Science
3:58 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Uncertainty Swirls Saturday's Predicted Meteor Shower

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:04 pm

Alan MacRobert of Sky and Telescope magazine says that Earth on Saturday may pass through relatively dense streams of debris, resulting in a vivid display of shooting stars — or it won't.

The Salt
3:01 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

California's Drought Isn't Making Food Cost More. Here's Why

Farmworkers pull weeds from a field of lettuce near Gonzales, Calif. Salinas Valley farms like this one rely on wells, which haven't been affected much by the drought.
George Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 3:48 pm

The entire state of California is in a severe drought. Farmers and farmworkers are hurting.

You might expect this to cause food shortages and higher prices across the country. After all, California grows 95 percent of America's broccoli, 81 percent of its carrots and 99 percent of the country's artichokes, almonds and walnuts, among other foods.

Yet there's been no sign of a big price shock. What gives?

Here are three explanations.

Read more
The Salt
11:54 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Sushi's Secret: Why We Get Hooked On Raw Fish

A feast for the eyes and the mouth. Tuna swim long distances, but their muscles are still soft and tender.
Kyodo /Landov

Originally published on Mon May 26, 2014 8:59 am

Raw fish is sizzling hot right now.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:28 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Tonight's New 'Giraffes' Meteor Shower Could Be A Great One

A map from NASA predicts the peak viewing areas and times for the Camelopardalids meteor shower Friday night and early Saturday.
Danielle Moser NASA

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 1:22 pm

An all-new meteor shower makes its debut tonight, and astronomers say it could put on a show starting as early as 10:30 p.m. ET Friday and peaking early Saturday. Called the Camelopardalids, the shower is named after the giraffe constellation. It's expected to be visible in nearly all of the U.S., if skies are clear.

"No one has seen it before," NASA says, "but the shower could put on a show that would rival the prolific Perseid meteor shower in August."

Read more
TED Radio Hour
8:10 am
Fri May 23, 2014

How Do You Deal With Fear Versus Danger?

"The scairest thing I've done is ride a rocket ship to space" — Chris Hadfield
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode What We Fear.

About Chris Hadfield's TEDTalk

Astronaut and retired colonel Chris Hadfield discusses how to prepare your mind for the unexpected, and the worst.

About Chris Hadfield

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:58 am
Fri May 23, 2014

What Those Baby Photos On Social Media Can Teach Us About Moms

"People are grappling with identity when they become parents, and they're also grappling with identity in terms of who we are online," says psychologist Daphne de Marneffe (not pictured).
Jonathan Ross iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 6:52 am

You can't miss 'em. Baby pictures have flooded so many Instagram and Facebook feeds that an app is now available to block them, if you want. But as the newness of social media collides with an experience as old as time — motherhood — researchers are beginning to study its sociological and psychological impacts.

Read more

Pages