Science, Technology and Environment

All Tech Considered
4:20 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Now Algorithms Are Deciding Whom To Hire, Based On Voice

Ilana Kohn Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 1:47 pm

If you're trying out for a job in sales, the person who judges your pitch may not be a person — it could be a computer.

Job recruitment is the newest frontier in automated labor, where algorithms are choosing who's the right fit to sell fast food or handle angry cable customers, by sizing up the human candidates' voices.

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Politics
4:20 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Monica Lewinsky Redefines Her Story In Anti-Cyberbullying TED Talk

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Technology
4:20 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Robot Reporters: Software Turns Raw Data Into Sports, Financial Reports

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
4:03 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Even Neil DeGrasse Tyson Is Now Munching On Bugs

Neil deGrasse Tyson with a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, wrapped in bacon. "I have come to surmise, in the culinary universe, that anytime someone feels compelled to wrap something in bacon, it probably doesn't taste very good," he said skeptically before taking a bite.
Carole Zimmer for NPR

More than 1,000 guests in gowns and tuxedos crowded into a two-story hall on Saturday night at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Standing among a pack of well-preserved African elephants, they sampled the delicacies offered by waiters wending their way through the throngs. They had come for the annual dinner of the Explorers Club — and the cocktail-hour fare certainly required an adventurous palate: All of it was made of insects.

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Shots - Health News
3:07 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Stats Split On Progress Against Cancer

Find other stories in the Living Cancer series at WNYC.org.
WNYC

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 7:33 am

When someone asks whether we're winning the war on cancer, the discussion often veers into the world of numbers. And, depending on which numbers you're looking at, the answer can either be yes or no.

Let's start with the no.

The number of cancer deaths in this country is on the rise. It climbed 4 percent between 2000 and 2011, the latest year in official statistics. More than 577,000 people died of cancer in 2011. That's almost a quarter of all deaths. Those aren't just personal tragedies – the figure represents a growing burden on America.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Why The War On Cancer Hasn't Been Won

Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 11:26 am

When President Richard Nixon declared a war on cancer in 1971, there were high hopes that scientists were close enough to understanding the underlying causes that many cures were within reach.

We obviously haven't won the war.

In fact, a prominent cancer biologist argues that the conceptual framework for understanding cancer has come full circle over the past 40 years.

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Goats and Soda
12:07 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

You Think Your City Is Full Of Trash? Ha!

Even Oscar the Grouch might be put off by the growing heaps of trash in the center of Kathmandu.
Donatella Lorch

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:51 pm

They don't call it Trashmandu for nothing.

In Nepal's capital city of Kathmandu, garbage is pretty much everywhere. It's stuffed in plastic bags and dropped in drainage ditches. It's piled high in empty lots, on the roadside and on the edges of the city's sewage-filled rivers.

It is thrown out of bus windows and off rooftops into neighbors' yards.

It's hard to believe Kathmandu could get any worse. But this month, it did.

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Parallels
11:07 am
Mon March 23, 2015

An Object Of Desire: Hope And Yearning For The Internet In Cuba

The Havana studio of prominent artist Kcho is ringed by Cubans with their heads buried in screens. Users say the only other free Internet connection in Havana is at the U.S. Interests Section.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 5:05 pm

After the sun sets on Havana on weekends, G Street turns into a kind of runway.

Blocks of the promenade — which is very colonial with its big, beautiful statues and impeccable topiaries — swell with crowds of young Cubans. For the most part, they just walk up and down, greeting each other with kisses.

It's a spectacle: Everyone, it seems, is here to impress. They're perfectly coiffed, perfectly matched; they're splayed on benches, arms wrapped around each other.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Mon March 23, 2015

A Side Of SpaceX You May Not Have Seen Before

Satellite separation during the Falcon 1 ABS/Eutelsat launch.
SpaceX

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 3:18 pm

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

SpaceX has put all of its images in the public domain — as the result of a tweet.

CEO Elon Musk tweeted Saturday:

Among the responses was this one:

Musk's reply:

SpaceX posted new images on its website and on Flickr. The decision puts SpaceX in the company of NASA, which also has its images in the public domain.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Fundraising Site For Teachers Illuminates Classroom Disparities

With DonorsChoose.org, teachers have an alternative to dipping into their own pockets to pay for classroom supplies.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:26 pm

What happens when a teacher wants to assign an extra book for class, but the school can't afford a copy for every student?

For Dana Vanderford, an English teacher at L.W. Higgins High School in New Orleans, the book was Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation. Buying enough copies for her class would have cost more than $800. Not an option.

"I get $80 a year to buy resources for my classroom," Vanderford says. "And I have 90 students per semester. So that $80 doesn't go very far."

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