World

Middle East
5:48 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Other International Issues Overshadow Iran Nuclear Talks

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:47 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Suicide Bombing In Kabul Kills 3 NATO Troops

A U.S. soldier stands guard near a damaged vehicle at the site of a suicide attack in Kabul on Tuesday.
Mohammad Ismail Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 6:41 am

The Taliban has claimed credit for a suicide attack on a military convoy just yards from the U.S. Embassy in Kabul that killed at least three NATO soldiers and wounding 20 other troops and civilians.

NPR's Sean Carberry, reporting from the Afghan capital, says the car bomb was detonated on one of the busiest streets in the city during rush hour.

"It shook the capital and set off alarms at the embassy," he says.

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NPR Story
4:16 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Details Emerge About U.S. Plans To Fight ISIS In Iraq

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 5:51 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
2:57 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Will Scotland Vote To Cut The Cord?

A tourist wears a poncho decorated with the national flag of Scotland to shelter from the weather in Edinburgh, Scotland on Monday.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 6:59 am

It's pouring in Edinburgh, and the fog is so thick you can barely see to the end of the block.

People walking through the city center duck out of the rain into a little stone alcove to talk about the subject on everyone's mind — Thursday's big vote on whether Scotland will become an independent country.

The latest polls show the race is extremely tight.

In the Edinburgh rain, a striking number of voters have recently changed their minds. Michael Constantine says he and his parents all switched sides.

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Goats and Soda
2:42 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Hiccups Were The Clue That Led Researchers To Ebola

Guinea's Red Cross health workers wearing protective suits in Conakry on September 14.
Cellou Binani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 5:26 am

The Ebola virus had been circulating in Guinea for roughly three months before doctors and international aid organizations finally detected it.

It was hiccups that eventually gave it away, journalist Jeffrey Stern wrote in Vanity Fair this weekend. With the Ebola outbreak raging on in West Africa, questions remains about how the virus eluded detection for so long and why the international community still haven't been able to contain it.

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Goats and Soda
4:28 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

What Obama Should Say And Do About Ebola

A health worker speaks with families in a classroom now used as Ebola isolation ward in Monrovia, Liberia. Ebola-stricken West Africa needs more health staff and more medical facilities.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 4:55 pm

Tomorrow, President Obama is scheduled to announce a new U.S. plan to help stop the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

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Business
4:11 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

With Turmoil Roiling Abroad, Why Aren't Oil Prices Bubbling Up?

A soldier guards a pipe en route to the Kawergosk Refinery near Irbil, the capital of the autonomous Kurdish region of northern Iraq, in July. Fighting in northern Iraq forced the closure of the country's largest oil refinery, Baiji, and cut production from the Kirkuk oil field this summer.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:49 pm

The price of oil has been falling — a drop that you may already have noticed at the pump. Gasoline prices have dropped noticeably since June, and oil is now well below $100 a barrel.

That decline has happened even as conflicts have flared in or near oil-producing regions. Normally, oil prices are expected to spike higher amid turmoil — so why have they been trending lower?

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Parallels
3:43 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra performs in Baghdad. The concert was promoted by word of mouth to avoid being targeted by bombs.
Graham Smith NPR

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 6:00 pm

It's a hot night in Baghdad, and the national theater is packed with people who are here to see the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra.

They're fanning themselves with programs that show conductor Karim Wasfi, a striking man with thick eyebrows and a pointed beard, playing the cello. Tonight, he'll be conducting for the first time in more than a year.

Iraq has been in the headlines lately, with extremists taking over parts of the country, American airstrikes, the militias and the politics.

But the country was once a sophisticated center for learning and the arts.

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Global Health
3:39 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Ebola Response Hampered By Limited Air Travel

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 4:11 pm

One of the major barriers keeping aid workers out of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea is limited and unpredictable air travel. Many airlines don't want to have their crews overnight in an Ebola area or send them to a place where they can't get adequate health care if something goes wrong.

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Africa
3:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Egypt Stamps Wrong Canal On Its Postage

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 4:11 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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