World

Heirs Of The Revolution: A Changing Cuba
2:29 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Cuba's Mariel Port: Once An Escape, Now A Window To The Future

A fisherman walks the streets of Mariel, on Cuba's northwest coast. In the distance, construction is underway on the Port of Mariel, where the government is creating a special free-trade zone.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 9:20 am

When you arrive at the Jose Marti International Airport in Havana, you're greeted with a barrage of billboards with the popular Cuban government slogan promoting tourism: "Cuba, where the past and the present converge."

Perhaps nowhere on the island is that statement more true than in the city of Mariel, about 30 miles from Havana on the northwestern coast.

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Parallels
2:27 am
Wed June 25, 2014

How Much Does A Terrorist Attack Cost? A Lot Less Than You'd Think

Fighters from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria march in Raqaa, Syria, in a picture posted on Jan. 14. The group is believed to hold as much as $2 billion.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:28 am

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is flush with cash, and holds as much as $2 billion. Counterterrorism officials say the group knows how to use that money to its advantage. It's showing a kind of professional acumen and discipline that sets it apart from other terrorist organizations. But what kinds of attacks can its money buy?

Back in 2006, when Germany was hosting the World Cup soccer tournament, a terrorist attack was narrowly averted. With bombs hidden in their suitcases, two men in their 20s boarded commuter trains in the city of Cologne.

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Asia
3:18 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

In Rift Over Interfaith Ban, A New Fault Line For Burmese Politics

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

Myanmar's parliament is now considering a bill that would restrict marriages of people from different religions. Buddhist nationalists hope it will protect their religion from the spread of Islam and claim it's a way to prevent coerced conversions, but critics lambaste the proposed law as targeting the country's Muslim minority.

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Asia
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Iraqi Crisis Brings Focus On Indian Migrants Who Seek Profit Amid Peril

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. When ISIS militants took control of wide swaths of northern Iraq, foreign workers in those areas ended up being trapped. India is working to win the release of some 40 of its citizens abducted in the Iraqi city of Mosul. There are also hundreds more in other locations who are clamoring to leave. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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Iraq
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

At Iraq's Largest Oil Refinery, Siege Nears A Complicated Conclusion

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

Transcript

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Media
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

For UK Phone-Hacking Case, An End In Acquittal And Conviction

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

Transcript

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Iraq
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

U.S. Faces Challenges In Shoring Up Iraq's Crumbling Military

The Iraqi army left behind equipment, including body armor and vehicles, as Sunni militants overran the northern city of Mosul earlier this month.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:19 pm

Rick Brennan remembers sitting around Baghdad back in 2011 with some fellow U.S. military planners. Talk turned to the Iraqi army of the future. In one scenario, they pictured the Iraqi army falling apart, splintering along ethnic lines.

"We painted a worst-case scenario, a nightmare scenario, that was exactly what we're seeing take place right now," Brennan says.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

NTSB: Too Much Technology, Too Little Training Caused Asiana Crash

Asiana Flight 214 crashed at San Francisco International Airport in July 2013. The NTSB concluded Tuesday that an over-reliance on automated systems contributed to the crash.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:32 pm

Pilot misjudgment and an over-reliance on automated systems were the main causes of last year's crash of Asiana Flight 214 in San Francisco that killed three people, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded Tuesday.

The Boeing 777 with 307 people aboard came in too low and too slow in its landing approach, the NTSB said. It hit a seawall, ripping off the tail and sending the plane's fuselage skidding down the tarmac.

The board said there was confusion over whether the plane was maintaining adequate speed for landing.

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World
11:39 am
Tue June 24, 2014

'Shameful' Verdict Exposes Egyptian Journalists' Fears

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We begin today with a story that's making headlines around the world. We're talking about the conviction of three journalists in Egypt in connection with their reporting. On Monday, Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed were found guilty of conspiring with the Muslim Brotherhood and spreading false news.

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Tue June 24, 2014

In Mafia Arrests, Clues To Slaying Of An NYPD Officer A Century Ago

A portrait of Lt. Giuseppe Petrosino.
Rod Lamkey Jr The Washington Times /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 12:56 pm

Lt. Giuseppe Petrosino is the only New York police officer to be killed in the line of duty outside the United States. It happened in March 1909 when Petrosino, one of the most celebrated officers in the department's history, was sent to Italy to investigate the Mafia.

The New York Times reports:

"He stayed in hotels under an assumed name, and grew a beard to alter his appearance. But his reputation and purpose had preceded him.

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