KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Two high-level officials in Oklahoma are under consideration for President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, but state law is particular about who can fill their seats if one or both move to Washington.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Attorney General Scott Pruitt have both met with Trump as he forms his Cabinet. Fallin is rumored to be a candidate for Secretary of the Interior, and Pruitt’s name has been floated for a role within the Environmental Protection Agency.

World Views: December 2, 2016

Dec 2, 2016

University of Nebraska political scientist Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado joins Suzette Grillot to discuss the legacy of Fidel Castro, who died November 25.

Then Suzette talks with Ned Breslin about the 20 years he spent in Africa working on water and sanitation issues.

Computer screen with heathcare.gov open.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Seven weeks from now Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. One of his signature campaign promises involved repealing or changing the hallmark legislative achievement of his predecessor – the Affordable Care Act.

Overhauling or undoing such a complex healthcare law nationwide won’t be a simple task, according to The Journal Record’s editor-in-chief Ted Streuli.

Sara Hill, Cherokee Nation secretary of the environment and natural resources, stands outside the Cherokee Nation Courthouse in Tahlequah.
Kirby Lee Davis / The Journal Record

The Cherokee Nation has sued the federal government, and wants to know details about how it has managed its property throughout history.

Washington has historically overseen certain assets of recognized tribes, like property or money earned off leasing or selling that land.

Dan Boren in his office in Oklahoma City, January 8, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A pair of high-profile Oklahoma Democrats say they won't seek their party's nomination to replace term-limited Gov. Mary Fallin in two years, including Fallin's 2014 challenger and the last Democrat to hold federal elected office in the state.

Updated December 2, 12:27 p.m.

Oklahoma's House Minority Leader says he's taking a "serious look" at running for governor in 2018.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Construction could resume as early as this spring on a long-delayed Native American museum near downtown Oklahoma City.

Even though the work stalled four years ago, the Chickasaw Nation and the City of Oklahoma City have almost resolved the final legal obstacles, The Journal Record's Brian Brus reports:

A recent court filing says the Tulsa Police Department's policy on the use of deadly force is unconstitutional.

In November 2014, Nathan Boyd was in the middle of a mental health episode when police officers approached his vehicle, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The Pawnee Nation on Nov. 18 filed a lawsuit against two federal agencies. The suit mentions the 5.8-magnitude Labor Day weekend quake asks ”a judge to void recently approved drilling permits on tribal land and halt the issuance of new ones,” the Tulsa World reports.

The Arbuckle Mountain Wind Farm in southern Oklahoma.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

State officials will consider recommending cuts to tax credits Tuesday as they look for a way to bring more money into the state.

Oklahoma's Incentive Evaluation Commission is meeting at 1 p.m. at the state Capitol to discuss what will go into a final report it plans to submit to lawmakers and Gov. Mary Fallin next month.

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

President-elect Donald Trump met with Gov. Mary Fallin on Monday to discuss a possible cabinet post. 

Updated 11:23 a.m.

Fallin emerged from Trump's office in Midtown Manhattan on Monday, saying she and the president-elect discussed his plan and agenda for the country and how she might be able to help.

"No, I was not offered a position. It was just an initial meeting to discuss a wide range of topics," Fallin told reporters gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower. The governor was accompanied by her husband Wade Christensen.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks to supporters during the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.
J. Pat Carter / AP

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., is urging President-elect Donald Trump to make nominating the next Director of National Intelligence a priority.

Lankford and U.S. Sen. Angus Young, I-Maine, sent a letter to the president-elect on behalf of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Thursday asking him to select someone who's interested in collaborating and limiting redundancies within the intelligence community.

The Nestle Purina plant at 13900 N. Lincoln Blvd. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Union workers in Edmond are suing their boss, and the fight started over tardy employees.

Two years ago, the Nestle Purina pet food manufacturing plant started a new attendance policy. If workers were late or didn’t show up, they would lose points.

The union eventually won an arbitration that showed Nestle Purina violated the employees’ bargaining agreement and also committed unfair labor practices, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Volunteers from the Kheir Zaman local supermarket sell a kilogram of sugar for 7.50 L.E. (0.84 US cents), in the Sayeda Zeinab neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt - October 26, 2016.
Nariman El-Mofty / AP

A week ago the International Monetary Fund approved a $12 billion loan to Egypt as the country slips into a perilous economic situation created by a declining currency, food shortages, and a strained relationship with a chief benefactor – Saudi Arabia.

“What we’re seeing from one end of the Middle East to the other is no money,” said Joshua Landis, the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “You look at the spreadsheet for Egypt, and everything is moving in the wrong direction.”

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

Oklahoma Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger speaks during a meeting of the State Board of Equalization in Oklahoma City, Monday, June 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma's top budget official says he's not worrying about a revenue failure… yet.

This time last year, lawmakers were wringing their hands over sales tax figures that painted a dim view of state revenue. That’s when revenue was about 3 percent below the estimate used to build their budget.

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